Image from page 60 of “Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock” (1892)

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Image from page 60 of “Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock” (1892)
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Identifier: locomotiveengine10hill
Title: Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Hill, John A. (John Alexander), 1858-1916 Sinclair, Angus, 1841-1919
Subjects: Railroads Locomotives
Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair, J.A. Hill [etc.]
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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nches diameter and13 feet 3 inches long. The brick arch issupported by water tubes 3 inches diam-eter. The boiler tubes provide 1,716.6square feet of heating surface; the watertubes, 14.7; the firebox, 135.3—a total of1,866.6 square feet. The grate has 27.35square feet of area; a Smith triple-expan- There has been a great -al written oflate years about the men who deserve thecredit for making a success of the exten-sion front and Open front stark of locomo-Whcn we look over the field ofeffort and experiment in this line, we thinkthat a good deal of credit is due to Mr.E. M. Reed, who was vice-president andgi 11 ral superintendent of the New York,New Haven & Hartford Railroad at thetime of his death. As early as 1863, Mr.Reed, who was then master mechanic ofthe road, applied an extended smokeboxto one of the locomotives, and after agreat deal of experiment and changinghe made it work successfully. He wasimpressed with the advantage that mustarise from giving the exhaust steam and

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ON LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN. TENN.. NARROW GAGE. 3,200 FEET ELEVATION.MOCCASIN BEND, TENNESSEE RIVER IN DISTANCE. sion exhaust pipe is used; the smokestacktapers from 16 to 17 inches diameter. There are two No. 9 Monitor injectorsand a Nathan sight-feed lubricator forcylinders and air pump. The Americanbrake is applied to all drivers and theWestinghouse to tender. The Gouldcoupler is applied to pilot and tender. AHudson bell ringer, Sherburn chimewhistle and Ashton muffled safety valvesare used. The engine has a very handsome ap-pearance, and is reported to be givinghighly satisfactory service. ft ft ft Nearly all locomotive engineers arefond of a smart engine, one that will startwith a bound when the throttle is openedand run at any speed. Many men arefirmly of the opinion that the proper wayto make a smart and fast-running engineis to give the valves plenty of lead. Leadwill help an engine in starting quick, butit acts against her when fast running isrequired. gases a free passage from the

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Image from page 256 of “The photographic history of the Civil War : in ten volumes” (1911)
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Identifier: photographichist06inmill
Title: The photographic history of the Civil War : in ten volumes
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Miller, Francis Trevelyan, 1877-1959 Lanier, Robert S. (Robert Sampson), 1880-
Subjects: War photography
Publisher: New York : Review of Reviews Co.
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant

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to see through the smoke, went up the main-mast almost as high as the maintop. While here, a quartermas-ter fastened a rojje around him to keep him from falling. But if deeds of bravery are to be mentioned in telling ofMobile Bay, much credit must be given to the small Confed-erate gunboats, Morgan, Gaines, and Selma, that kept up araking fire which caused great havoc among the advancing ves-sels. To the great ram Tennessee and the magnificent fightthat she fought, honor is due also. Her engines were hastilyconstructed, and of insufficient strength. She charged throughthe whole line; the Hartford dodged her, although it had beenthe desire of brave old Admiral Buchanans heart to sink theflagship. The Brooldyn had a narrow escape, and the Mo-nongaliela, under Commander James H. Strong, attempted toram the Tennessee, and drove, bows on, against her side; thel)low hardty changed the great rams direction. The Ossipeeattempted to follow the Monongalielas lead, but the Tennessee [ 252 ] fiS^

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COPvrtlGHT, 1911 REVIEW OF REVIEWS CO. LEADERS ON SEA AND LAND—FARRAGUT AND GRANGER AFTER THE BATTLE OF MOBILE BAY This splendid picture shows the cahii and finely-molded features of the great admiral just after the accomplishment of a feat whichsave in bravery oer-topped his great achievement of the passage of the forts below New Orleans. Tliere Farragut had done what waspronoimced impossible, but at Mobile he had fought his way tlirough dangers ten times more formidable. Here, -^ith the modesty whichever characterized him, he sits within the captured Fort (iaines on Dauphin Island, discussing with General Gordon Granger plansfor the combined attack by which Fort Morgan was taken on August 22, 1864. It was to Granger that Mobile finally surrendered- passed between them, and made for the Oneida, which was notunder steerageway. It was at this exciting moment that the monitors drew up,and the Winnebago, forging ahead, took her position betweenthe ram and her seemingly helpless prey. T

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Image from page 241 of “Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock” (1892)
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: locomotiveengine12hill
Title: Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Hill, John A. (John Alexander), 1858-1916 Sinclair, Angus, 1841-1919
Subjects: Railroads Locomotives
Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair, J.A. Hill [etc.]
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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2inches at top, 16 inches near bottom. Smoke stack top above rail—15 feet 4?^inches. Boiler supplied by—Tivo injectors. Sel-lers improved, 9^ R. H., Monitor No. 9L. H. Weight of tender, empty—46,200 pounds. Wheels, number of—Eight. Wheels, diameter—36 inches. Journals, diameter and length—5 by 9inches. Wheel-base—17 feet 8 inches. Tender frame—lo-inch steel channels. Tender trucks—Center bearing doubleI-beam bolster, with side bearings on backtruck. Water capacity—6,000 United Statesgallons. Coal capacity—10 tons. Total wheel-base of engine and tender—52 feet 25^ inches. Engine equipped with two Coales safetyvalves; Nathan & Co. No. 9 triple sight-feed lubricator; Westinghouse-Americancombined brakes on drivers, tender and

Text Appearing After Image:
FIG. 19. HORWICH SHOPS, L. & Y. RAILWAY. milling machine idea in existence. Ido not know who is to be credited withthe origination of it, for in the oldershops at Crewe I saw machines essenti-ally like it at work, and, later, at thegreat establishment of the CockerillCompany at Seraing, Belgium, I saw amachine embodying the same principles toward the work by means of a screwwhich takes hold of the swinging frameat the top, as shown. When the work isat first put into the machine it does notrotate, but is held still in such a positionthat the milling cutter, being fed in, cutsout the slot forming the crank-webs, andthis feed automatically stops when the May, 1899. Lor-OMoTixi-; i: NT. I \i; Kir INC 227 right depth is reached to leave enoughmetal to form the pin. The cutter arboris then held in this position while thefeed motion which revolves the axle onthe centers, being thrown in, mills thepin so closely to size and shape thatwhen the axle afterward goes to the lathe,only finishin

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LGBT Infographic: CreditDonkey.com Zeroes in on the Spending Power of the LGBT Community

LGBT Infographic: CreditDonkey.com Zeroes in on the Spending Power of the LGBT Community

CreditDonkey

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) October 30, 2013

By putting facts and figures about the buying power of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community all in one infographic, CreditDonkey.com has highlighted the growing proportion of this consumer group’s spending power.

Infographic: http://www.creditdonkey.com/lgbt.html

In “Pink Money Talk: The Rise of the LGBT Consumer,” CreditDonkey.com, a financial education and credit card comparison website, illustrates the rise in same-sex couple households over the past decade, the LGBT community’s preference to unrecorded in urban areas more than its heterosexual peers, and the rise in its buying power.

“As acceptance and awareness of the LGBT community in recent years has led to an increase in this group’s willingness to come forward and be counted in publicly available databases, companies can benefit from gaining a better understanding of this group,” says Charles Tran, founder of CreditDonkey.com. “Depending on their type of business, companies may want to make changes to their products or marketing campaigns to reach this group. Otherwise, they could be leaving money on the table.”

In fact, CreditDonkey’s infographic notes that same-sex households tend to make more shopping trips than other households. In addition, the majority reported they are more likely to make purchases of everyday items from companies that specifically market to the LGBT community.

CreditDonkey.com regularly canvases research on certain demographics to view spending patterns and trends of both consumers and businesses. Earlier this year, for example, the website showcased the growth of Asian-owned businesses as “A Thriving Segment of the U.S. Economy,” as well as the interesting dynamics of today’s mother in Moms, Work, and Family: A Balancing Act.

CreditDonkey.com provides information on the credit issues, news, and trends facing Americans through market research and analysis. CreditDonkey.com aims to make personal finance “donkey-proof” (easy to understand) to give consumers the information they need to make savvy financial decisions.


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