Image from page 20 of “The Utah Farmer : dedicated to Agriculture when you look at the Rocky hill Region” (1913)

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Image from page 20 of “The Utah Farmer : dedicated to Agriculture into the Rocky Mountain area” (1913)
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Identifier: utahfarmerdevot1219utah_0
Title: The Utah Farmer : dedicated to Agriculture when you look at the Rocky hill area
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: Utah State Agricultural College. Extension Provider
Subjects: Agriculture Farmers Farm management Farm create Farmers’ spouses
Publisher: Lehi and Salt Lake City, Ut. Co
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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ing desired in Cheaters from a wean-ing pig to a winner boar or sow atprices all can afford. Top Quality stock.Write m«. Fer Referance—all old consumers. GEO H. LAWSHE.Falls City, Idaho REGISTERED HOLSTEINS FOR SALEYoung Bulls from A R. O: dams siredby Kay Apple Korndyke 13th whose 3-4brother recently offered for ,000. If youwish these highly bred animalsget busy and acquire first choice. NELSON BROSRichmond, Utah. HOLSTEIN BULLS ON THE MARKET. Heering a Count No. 57541. Most readily useful,Utah had Bull at State Fair 1914,and 5 of his sons. Natural Bred andRegistered. VERNE BARTHOLOMEWFillmore Utah WANTED—To obtain grower, assoon as new crop is harvested for 1916,seed—500-1000 bushels fieid peas.State sort and cost. OWEN G. ARNOTHylton Nevada desired to hear from owner of goodRanch available. Send cash cost and de-scription. D. F. Bush, Minneapolis, Minn. AVAILABLE. Holstein Bull calves sired by halfbrother into the champion cow of thebreed. Fine thrifty calves. STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLOgden Utah

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SELECT THE DUROCS NOWWe have 200—Take your choiceSPRING LAKE STOCK FARMPAYSON, UTAH WE MAKE EVERYTHING WE CALL a Debt lowering Loan YOU CAN PAY BACK THE PRINCI PAL GRADUALLY. MILLER & VIELE FARMS LOANS803-7-Kearns Bldg.Salt Lake City. Sheep, CattleStallions, Jacks OBTAINABLE Pure bred Cotewolds, registered and non-registered, in tiny or huge lots. Registered Shorthorns. Beef and milk■trains ROOSEVELT LIVE STOCK CO-CLEVELAND, IDA.Edwin Bennlon. W. R. Smith. BUTTER WRAPPERS We carry a large stock associated with BestVegetable Parchment Butter Wrap-pers and particularly Prepared Ink forPrinting exactly the same. We furnish themPostage Prepaid at the followingPrices, money to accompany purchase. 100 We .90 200 ?1.26 500 .00 1000 ?2.75 Send all instructions towards the UTAH FARMER LEHI, UTAH GEORGE FITCHS ESSAY ON ALFALFA. George Fitch, the well known hum-orist, could be the composer of the followingvest pocket essay on alfalfa: Alfalfa is the better popular break-fast meals for cattle. It’s a short, curlyplant looking like ov

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Image from page 188 of “the road railway review” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev161amer
Title: The road railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electric Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co
Adding Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Users and Sloan Foundation

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lus for the 12 months amounting to ,704. Thecompany features a capital stock of 0,000. a bonded indebtedness of,000 and a floating financial obligation of 6,103. without disruption. It’s been pretty much hard as theline is situated on circumstances highway plus in many locations it was foundnecessary to tear within the old track and move it in one part ofthe highway to the other so that you can expel grade crossings.The double track when finished will take, for a distance of 10miles, the north half hawaii road through the cities ofDartmouth and Westport. In the small cities across the line it isnecessary to mix people roads. Discover one grade crossingwith a steam railroad. Once the line was first established in 1893, single-truck, 20-ft. carswere operated. After five years they certainly were found insufficient and25-ft. automobiles with smoking cigarettes compartments had been substituted. Threeyears ago standard 30-ft. vehicles built with GE-70 or Westing-house-101 engines, four every single vehicle, changed the smaller supply-

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3F THE OLD TRACK ALONG STATE HIGHWAY, SHOWING 2ND TRACK. As shown regarding the after web page, the running expenses are ex-ceedingly high, due partly to your problem labeled in apreceding part. This provider ended up being arranged whenever electricrailway operation was in its infancy and it has since slowly takenon new way life until it is currently one of the substantial interurban prop-erties of New The united kingdomt. Reconstruction and Operation. Early in 1005 the administration discovered that, due to thedemand for lots more vehicles and a faster headway, the single-track overwhich it absolutely was running had been insufficient. In those days it wasdecided to reconstruct the old-line and lay another track. The workwas begun late in springtime and has now already been vigorously carried onuntil it is currently established that by the final of April the reconstruc-tion work will have already been completed. Through the work of double-tracking, the usual headway of 15minutes in summer and half an hour in wintertime has-been preserved ment and are usually still being used. What h

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Image from page 27 of “Portraits of eminent Americans now living : with biographical and historical memoirs of their lives and actions” (1853)

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Image from page 27 of “Portraits of eminent Americans now living : with biographical and historical memoirs of their lives and actions” (1853)
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Identifier: portraitsofemine03livi
Title: Portraits of eminent Americans now living : with biographical and historical memoirs of their lives and actions
Year: 1853 (1850s)
Authors: Livingston, John
Subjects:
Publisher: New York : Lamport & Co.
Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Connecticut Libraries

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roduced by state repudiations and almost universal SKETCHES OF EMINENT AMERICANS. bankruptcy. Who shall say that the souls of men of business havenot been as much tried through this half century as those of patriotswere tried through the quarter that preceded it 1 The writer of this can testify from personal knowledge that the ex-ertions of Benjamin Marshall have been sustained throughout thiswhole period and tlirough all the perils which from time to time havebeset his path, by an unfailing trust in Providence, and that he looksto the Giver of every good and perfect gift as the Author of all his suc-cess. In this feeling, or rather principle, his early associates, whohave been long resting from their labors, sympathized with him entire-ly ; and when, in the due course of nature, he shall pass like them froma useful and blameless life to a peaceful and hopeful death, he willleave to his survivors an example in the former, and a proof that therighteous are never forsaken in the latter.

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^^^ Oy TLYliOVTH COVNJ-yrMASS ZECHARIAH EDDY, OF MASSACHUSETTS. 5 ZECHARIAH EDDY, OF MIDDLEBOROUGH, MASSACHUSETTS. The subject of this notice lives on an ancestral estate in Middlebo-roiigh. His pilgrim ancestor, Samuel Eddy, (son of William Eddy, anon-conforming minister of the county of Kent, England,) joined thepilgrim fathers at Plymouth in 1630, accompanied by his brother John,Avho, in 1631, joined the planters of Massachusetts, having beenrecommended to their hospitality and fellowship by Governor Bradfordand his assistants, by a letter to Governor Winthrop, a, facsimile ofwhich may be found in the Historical and Genealogical Register pub-lished in Boston, vol. ii, pages 240, 244. The Middleborough lands, the homestead of the present Mr. Eddy,were purchased by the ancestor, Samuel, and twenty-five others, ofthe local Sachem Wampatuck, and of Tispaquin, the blackSachem, as early as 1662, and afterwards confirmed to them by Gov-ernor Bradford, of Plymouth, and his assistants in th

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Image from page 156 of “Practical druggist and pharmaceutical review of reviews” (1896)
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Identifier: practicaldruggis1316newyuoft
Title: Practical druggist and pharmaceutical review of reviews
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Pharmacy
Publisher: New York : Lillard
Contributing Library: Gerstein – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Ontario Council of University Libraries and Member Libraries

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rt neces-sary to construct the window ads to profitby the possibilities within the scope ofstore front advertising. Coiirtesy Pays. One of the greatest assets a businessman can have is courtesy. A churlish manner is sufficient to sendany man in the bankruptcy court, who hasto come into personal contact with hiscustomers. If a customer comes into your shop andis answered curtly and surlily you not tion, will bring people to your shop.When they are there it is your own faultif you cannot direct attention to yourgoods in such a manner as will either leadto an immediate or prospective sale. Thisdoes not mean that you should press goodson your customer that she does not re-quire, and it may simply be done by at-tractive display. Courtesy is profitable to any businessman, and your courtesy should be uni-form. Whether j-our customers are richor poor, the courtesy should be the same. Because your customer is poor and onlymakes a small purchase can never be anexcuse for discourteous treatment.

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.^%r^ ^t%

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Image from page 95 of “Old buildings of New York City, with some notes regarding their origin and occupants” (1907)
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Identifier: oldbuildingsnewy00newy
Title: Old buildings of New York City, with some notes regarding their origin and occupants
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Historic buildings — New York (State) New York
Publisher: New York : Brentano’s
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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49 and was ever after devoted to his profession,playing throughout this country and also abroad. He was crushed by the affair of the assassinationof President Lincoln and retired from the stage for ayear, but never lost his personal popularity. He openedBooths Theater in Twenty-third Street in 1869 andfor thirteen years maintained the most popular revivalsof Shakespeares tragedies ever known in the city. Al-though forced into bankruptcy in 1873, he retrieved hisfortunes by earning two hundred thousand dollars infifty-six weeks. In 1882 he went to Kurope and was received withthe greatest favor. In 1888 he purchased the buildinghere shown (formerly the residence of Valentine G.Hall), remodeled and furnished it and presented it toactors and tlie friends of the drama as Tlie Players,a complete gentlemans club, liootli made his homeat The Players from the date of its opening untilhis deatli, A\]iich took ])]ace in tliis Iioiisf ,]\\v 7. 1893.* * N;itl. Cvclo. ol Anicr. 15i()-. 91

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Image from page 699 of “Hardware merchandising March-June 1917” (1917)

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Image from page 699 of “Hardware merchandising March-June 1917” (1917)
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Identifier: hardmerchmarjun1917toro
Title: Hardware merchandising March-June 1917
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

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t is actually made up and a saleresults. Let him take all the credit tohimself. The record kept by this firmmight prove a very interesting sidelighton the machinery behind some of thesepurchases. Never lose sight of anyonewho displays any interest in any line ofthe stores trade. This is the principlethat E. I. Torrens has put into success- sequently their very appearance is a sell-ing factor. The third storey is used forstorage purposes. Goods are receivedthrough a rear door adjacent to thegoods elevator, and are conveyed at onceto the top storey. This leaves the mainselling floor free from any accumulationof surplus stock, and permits of an or-derly arrangement and a clean and at-tractive store. Handsome Display FixtureThe attractive nature of the store isincreased by every modern display fix-ture. On the right-hand side two silentsalesmen appearing in the illustrationaccompanying the article show cutleryand sporting goods. Behind these countersare the cases for sundries of the hard-

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Section of the interior of Torrens Hardware, Tillsonburg, Ont., showing neat arrangement of stock ful operation. Of course, you can often,cultivate a desire for something on thepart of the purchaser, but once a visitorto the store has expressed an interest inany line, it is evident that this first stephas already been taken. Mr. Torrens isalso a firm believer in newspaper andcircular advertising. Circulars are fre-quently mailed to farmer customers. An-other plan is to place advertising litera-ture in parcels of goods purchased byfarmers. A Word About the StoreNow, just a word about the storeitself, for it is decidedly worth a wordof description, being one of the mostcompletely equipped hardware stores inthe section. The store is three storeysin height, and each storey is served by agoods hoist. On the second floor thereis a complete display of stoves. Ampleroom is given for their display, and con- ware trade. The long display of these isbroken by an attractive built-in glasscabinet f

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Image from page 1313 of “Le quincaillier (Juillet-Decembre 1907)” (1907)
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Identifier: lequincaijuidec1907mont
Title: Le quincaillier (Juillet-Decembre 1907)
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Commerce
Publisher: Montréal :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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NOUS OFFRONS POUR LE COMMERCE DAUTOMXKET DHIVER UNE GRANDE VARIETE DE MAR-CHANDISES DE SAISON, NOTAMMENT: Lanternes, Pieges, Chaines,Patins, Crelots, Haches, Codendards, Scies, Orhii+olloriA Pino des Meilleures MarquesV/UUlCllcriC rillC et de Modeles Varies: Services a Decouper SHi!0 Couteaux, Canifs, Rasoirs, Ciseaux, Vaisselle de Table, Etc. MAGASINS ET ENTREPOTS: 297 et 299 Rue St-Paul MONTREAL 1® H nn HHHU HUHHHHHHH w. S HIIW>H n s ws m 1U LE PKIX COURANT siderable, le tout peut rapporter des pro-fits raisonnables. Lidee populaire est quun magasin adeyattemeuts est simplement le groupe-ment, sous un seul toit, dun grand nom-bre de commerces ©Spares. Mais on a

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Atelier de chaussures dans le magasinde Wanamaker, Philadelphie deja essaye de reunir dans un seul maga-sin plusieurs commerces pour diminuer lecout du loyer et dautres frais fixes, eton acesse cet essai qui na pas .reussi. Le suc-ces du magasin a departements repose surun proncipe entierement different: laspecialisation. Les departements nesont pas independants, mais ils formentdes centres dactivite hautement speciali-ses, se conformant a certaines lois fixesqui gouvernent i efcablissement entier. Lancienne metbode de faire les affai-res etait simple et tres elastique. ILe pro-prietaire achetait a aussi bon marchequil pouvait, dhabitude en quantites quinetaient mesurees que par sa oapacitede vente et par son credit. II marquaitles marchandises en signes connus de lui,indiquant quelquefois le cout reel et 11laissait son commis faire autant de pro-fit quil pouvait sur le client. Le pro-prietaire dependait done cOmplletenient delhabilete de ses commis pour son profit;le commis qui en im

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Image from page 422 of “Factory and industrial management” (1891)
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Identifier: factoryindustria12newy
Title: Factory and industrial management
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Engineering Factory management Industrial efficiency
Publisher: New York [etc.] McGraw-Hill [etc.]
Contributing Library: Engineering – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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consideration. In 1887 a profit-sharing system was devised to take the place ofthe contract method. This profit-sharing scheme was based on whatthe management considered a liberal piece-price for producing thefinished work ; this was an arbitrary assumption, based, of course, ona long series of records of the previous cost of the same or similarwares, and this piece-price so fixed on work delivered constituted thedepartments credit. Against this credit the labor cost, files, wasteand oil, and small tools and special tools maintenance were charged;if the charges footing was less than the credit footing,—as it was, Ibelieve, in all cases,— the difference was credited to the department asprofit gained, and one-half was divided among all workers in that de-partment in a flat percentage on wages earned, the company takingthe other half. These contracts were made for from three to fiveyears without variation in piece-rates ; the foremen were paid at day- 4o8 SUCCESSFUL SHOP MANAGEMENT.

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PIERCING THE KEY BOWS. rates from to , and the workmen were paid sometimes day-ratesand sometimes piece rates. The highest gain was as much as thirtyper cent, of wages, which gave every man, foreman and workmanalike, a 15 per cent, addition to his wages at the end of a year. Incase of a foreman who had been a contractor and had made ,000 ayear, and who was, under the profit-sharing system, rated at ^5 perday, or, say, ,500 a year, the 15 per cent, gain would give him,725 for his years pay, instead of, say, ,000, which he inighthave made under the contract system. Common hands, making, say0, would have added, making their total pay 5. Thefaults of this system are the long periods between divisions of gain,and the small incentive to close application on the part of the fore-men. It was abandoned as a general policy in 1893, although profit-sharing was continued in one case up to August, 1895. The method now in use for reducing cost is to divide the wholeforce of w

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Image from page 1526 of “The Post-Office annual Glasgow directory” (1828)

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Image from page 1526 of “The Post-Office annual Glasgow directory” (1828)
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Identifier: postofficeannual189394gla
Title: The Post-Office annual Glasgow directory
Year: 1828 (1820s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Glasgow : printed by J. Graham for the letter-carriers of the Post-Office
Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland
Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland

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JSl J& A LIFE ^ ANNUITIES *f LOANS.Subscribed Capital, £1,000,000. I Eeserve Funds, – £1,350, Chairman—Sm ANDREW LUSK, Bart., M.P. NEW FEATURE.-DOUBLE BENEFIT POLICIES. SUM ASSURED PAID TWICE, on attaining a specified age, and again at death.TWO POLICIES INSTEAD OF ONE. On attaining the specified age,Assured has option of— (1.) Cash payment of the Policy due. (2.) Annuity in addition to the Policy payable at death. or (3.) Considerable increase in the sum to be payable at death.If Tinahle to keep up Policy, assured is held covered for exact proportion of sum originally;bargained for, corresponding with the number of premiums paid in. For Prospectuses and further Information, apply to the Glasgow Branch—141 WEST GEORGE STREET. J. E. SANDILANDS, Local Managee. JSankers COMMERCIAL BANK OF SCOTLAND (LIMITED). Solicitors, …… Messrs. MACLAY, MURRAY, & SPENS, 169 West George Streel Medical Referee, … Dr. JAMES D. MACLAREN, 1 Newton Place. ADVERTISEMENTS. 161

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five d Bcdbcnt ©fftce Ximiteb. SCOTTISH BRANCH—101 ST. VINCENT STREET, GLASGOW. Biuctors. Gilbert Beith, Esq., M.P. (Messrs. Beith, Stevenson, & Co.), Glasgow. Stewart Clark, Esq., J.P. (Messrs. Clark & Co.), Paisley. Wm. Cox, Esq., J.P. (Messrs. Cox Bros,), Dundee. Joseph Grimond, Esq., J.P. (Messrs. J. & A. D. Grimond, Ltd.), Dundee. Alexander Henderson, Esq., J.P., Dundee. Jas. Miller, Esq., J.P. (Messrs. Wm. MLaren, Sons, & Co.), Glasgow. Secretanj—GEOUGE DUTHIE, ACCIDENT DEPARTMENT.—Policies issued at Moderate Rates, with the mostrecently adopted advantages, and free from all vexatious conditions, with the following SPECIAL ADVANTAGE-ONE PREMIUM RETURNED EVERY FIFTH YEAR TO THOSEWHO HAVE MADE NO CLAIM. FIRE DEPARTMENT.—Policies issued on all Classes of Risks at Equitable Rates. EBAD OFFIOU-ST. ANN STREET, MANCHESTER BRANCHES ALSO AT London, Liverpool, Bradford, Dublin, Belfast, Birmingham, Bristol, Huddersfield, Halifax, Dundee, and Galashiels. Gantlemen

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Image from page 24 of “The American Legion Weekly [Volume 2, No. 15 (May 7, 1920)]” (1920)
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Identifier: americanlegionwe215amer
Title: The American Legion Weekly [Volume 2, No. 15 (May 7, 1920)]
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: American Legion. National Headquarters
Subjects: American Legion periodicals
Publisher: American Legion
Contributing Library: The American Legion National Headquarters Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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i who are now operating Haywood Shops and making bur monoj. What these men have done.yoo ^M.HAYWOOO.Pres.can do. 00 to 00 a year ia conservative. W Haywoad Tlra & Equip* One machine will give yon a atart. Yoa can see business around yoo~«»erywhere there an> •atetnobllea A…. ment Companythmenaretires that need repairing. Yoa know that. All yoa do ia open a sbop.-pnt opt • Haywood j^Wo7CapltolAve.,lndlaitapolIl – If yoo haven t aTCKAR SIR:~PIoase sendlmaHnvwood TlreRe-ulars on _ . tlree that need repairing. .attrn and auto owoerswill come to you, welcome you and the service yon brine them.Been the Sign of the Man and Machine there la a big opportunity awaiting yoa. Sign the coupon and mail it today, or tend a pott card or UtterM. HAYWOOD. President Haywood Tire & Equipment Co., 1282 Capitol Ave.. Indian.politt tad. , your book on Haywood Tire Re-pair Plants and full par!your National Tire Repair Service_rand details of your Free school of* tire repairing. tftmt-

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Saved649° On a Diamond A Nevada customer writes: *0.00diamond appraised at 82U0.00. Sold IIfor 6.00. -[Nimo on request.) This firm nearly 8 (A century old. rated overVI.000,000.00, lends money on high cruder Jewelry. Amazing bargains la unpaid loandiamonds. Free examination. Why Pay Full Prices Provo for yourself that Its nontcessary. 8end your „name for wonderful I fete free. Every jewel accuratelyF described in detail. Radically different from caU*lets. See these prices before you buy. j Send for Latest LiDiamond Loan* M™* anpaia loans. Hundreds of diamondarar antler market prices. Free examination.Amazing bargains proved by customersUtters. Write today.Jne. Octroy & Sons, 9281 Deftoy B]dt.Only Opposite P.O.. Pittsburgh,Btfertneem by vtrmUrton: Bank

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Image from page 60 of “Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock” (1892)

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Image from page 60 of “Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock” (1892)
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Identifier: locomotiveengine10hill
Title: Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Hill, John A. (John Alexander), 1858-1916 Sinclair, Angus, 1841-1919
Subjects: Railroads Locomotives
Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair, J.A. Hill [etc.]
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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nches diameter and13 feet 3 inches long. The brick arch issupported by water tubes 3 inches diam-eter. The boiler tubes provide 1,716.6square feet of heating surface; the watertubes, 14.7; the firebox, 135.3—a total of1,866.6 square feet. The grate has 27.35square feet of area; a Smith triple-expan- There has been a great -al written oflate years about the men who deserve thecredit for making a success of the exten-sion front and Open front stark of locomo-Whcn we look over the field ofeffort and experiment in this line, we thinkthat a good deal of credit is due to Mr.E. M. Reed, who was vice-president andgi 11 ral superintendent of the New York,New Haven & Hartford Railroad at thetime of his death. As early as 1863, Mr.Reed, who was then master mechanic ofthe road, applied an extended smokeboxto one of the locomotives, and after agreat deal of experiment and changinghe made it work successfully. He wasimpressed with the advantage that mustarise from giving the exhaust steam and

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ON LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN. TENN.. NARROW GAGE. 3,200 FEET ELEVATION.MOCCASIN BEND, TENNESSEE RIVER IN DISTANCE. sion exhaust pipe is used; the smokestacktapers from 16 to 17 inches diameter. There are two No. 9 Monitor injectorsand a Nathan sight-feed lubricator forcylinders and air pump. The Americanbrake is applied to all drivers and theWestinghouse to tender. The Gouldcoupler is applied to pilot and tender. AHudson bell ringer, Sherburn chimewhistle and Ashton muffled safety valvesare used. The engine has a very handsome ap-pearance, and is reported to be givinghighly satisfactory service. ft ft ft Nearly all locomotive engineers arefond of a smart engine, one that will startwith a bound when the throttle is openedand run at any speed. Many men arefirmly of the opinion that the proper wayto make a smart and fast-running engineis to give the valves plenty of lead. Leadwill help an engine in starting quick, butit acts against her when fast running isrequired. gases a free passage from the

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Image from page 256 of “The photographic history of the Civil War : in ten volumes” (1911)
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Identifier: photographichist06inmill
Title: The photographic history of the Civil War : in ten volumes
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Miller, Francis Trevelyan, 1877-1959 Lanier, Robert S. (Robert Sampson), 1880-
Subjects: War photography
Publisher: New York : Review of Reviews Co.
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant

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to see through the smoke, went up the main-mast almost as high as the maintop. While here, a quartermas-ter fastened a rojje around him to keep him from falling. But if deeds of bravery are to be mentioned in telling ofMobile Bay, much credit must be given to the small Confed-erate gunboats, Morgan, Gaines, and Selma, that kept up araking fire which caused great havoc among the advancing ves-sels. To the great ram Tennessee and the magnificent fightthat she fought, honor is due also. Her engines were hastilyconstructed, and of insufficient strength. She charged throughthe whole line; the Hartford dodged her, although it had beenthe desire of brave old Admiral Buchanans heart to sink theflagship. The Brooldyn had a narrow escape, and the Mo-nongaliela, under Commander James H. Strong, attempted toram the Tennessee, and drove, bows on, against her side; thel)low hardty changed the great rams direction. The Ossipeeattempted to follow the Monongalielas lead, but the Tennessee [ 252 ] fiS^

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COPvrtlGHT, 1911 REVIEW OF REVIEWS CO. LEADERS ON SEA AND LAND—FARRAGUT AND GRANGER AFTER THE BATTLE OF MOBILE BAY This splendid picture shows the cahii and finely-molded features of the great admiral just after the accomplishment of a feat whichsave in bravery oer-topped his great achievement of the passage of the forts below New Orleans. Tliere Farragut had done what waspronoimced impossible, but at Mobile he had fought his way tlirough dangers ten times more formidable. Here, -^ith the modesty whichever characterized him, he sits within the captured Fort (iaines on Dauphin Island, discussing with General Gordon Granger plansfor the combined attack by which Fort Morgan was taken on August 22, 1864. It was to Granger that Mobile finally surrendered- passed between them, and made for the Oneida, which was notunder steerageway. It was at this exciting moment that the monitors drew up,and the Winnebago, forging ahead, took her position betweenthe ram and her seemingly helpless prey. T

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Image from page 241 of “Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock” (1892)
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Identifier: locomotiveengine12hill
Title: Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Hill, John A. (John Alexander), 1858-1916 Sinclair, Angus, 1841-1919
Subjects: Railroads Locomotives
Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair, J.A. Hill [etc.]
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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2inches at top, 16 inches near bottom. Smoke stack top above rail—15 feet 4?^inches. Boiler supplied by—Tivo injectors. Sel-lers improved, 9^ R. H., Monitor No. 9L. H. Weight of tender, empty—46,200 pounds. Wheels, number of—Eight. Wheels, diameter—36 inches. Journals, diameter and length—5 by 9inches. Wheel-base—17 feet 8 inches. Tender frame—lo-inch steel channels. Tender trucks—Center bearing doubleI-beam bolster, with side bearings on backtruck. Water capacity—6,000 United Statesgallons. Coal capacity—10 tons. Total wheel-base of engine and tender—52 feet 25^ inches. Engine equipped with two Coales safetyvalves; Nathan & Co. No. 9 triple sight-feed lubricator; Westinghouse-Americancombined brakes on drivers, tender and

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FIG. 19. HORWICH SHOPS, L. & Y. RAILWAY. milling machine idea in existence. Ido not know who is to be credited withthe origination of it, for in the oldershops at Crewe I saw machines essenti-ally like it at work, and, later, at thegreat establishment of the CockerillCompany at Seraing, Belgium, I saw amachine embodying the same principles toward the work by means of a screwwhich takes hold of the swinging frameat the top, as shown. When the work isat first put into the machine it does notrotate, but is held still in such a positionthat the milling cutter, being fed in, cutsout the slot forming the crank-webs, andthis feed automatically stops when the May, 1899. Lor-OMoTixi-; i: NT. I \i; Kir INC 227 right depth is reached to leave enoughmetal to form the pin. The cutter arboris then held in this position while thefeed motion which revolves the axle onthe centers, being thrown in, mills thepin so closely to size and shape thatwhen the axle afterward goes to the lathe,only finishin

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Identifier: index1926univ
Title: Index
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Writers: University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Subjects: University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Publisher: [Amherst, Mass.] : University of Massachusetts
Adding Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
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ry ofM. A. C. basketball. Dartmouth was at enough time associated with beat tied up for claim tothe Eastern Collegiate tournament and had been consequently beaten only byPrinceton. The game, throughout, ended up being described as clean, hard playing onthe element of both groups, also it was only by pluck additionally the Aggie .spirit that thewinning point ended up being .scored. The season opened with five veterans, CaptainSamuels, Temple, Smiley, Jones, and Ferranti, and many prospects.Merry Partenheimer of Greenfield was eventually chosen to inhabit the area leftvacant by Eddie bicycle, final years captain. This lineup had been played intact untilLarry Jones was laid up with the grippe, whenever Gus Gustafson of Brocktonbroke to the lineup. Johnny Temple had been high scorer for the group, with 118points to his credit. He had been, however, followed by Partenheimer andCaptain Samuels. In general, it had been the right teamwork and specific excellence that causedthe Flying Agrarians to bloom as the New England Champions for 1925. 15P

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i:f)e iPa^kettjall Ceam Samuel B. SamuelsLeo F. DuffyPreston J. DavenportHarold M. Gore . Kept Forward—TempleRight Forivard—Samuels Ferranti illemfacrg Center—JonesGriffin Captain . Management Assistant Manager Coach R ight G uard—Par tenliei raerLeft Guard—Smiley Gustafson 160 tKtjc 1925 ^cf)EbuIe Date Gamen January 7 Clark . January 9 Trinity January 10 C. C. N. Y. January 15 Norwich . January 22 Williams January 24 Wesleyan January 30 Harvard . January 31 Univ. of N. H February 4 Dartmouth February 7 Northeastern February 11 Springfield February 18 Conn. Aggie February 20 Brown February 28 Tufts in which PlayedAt M. A. C.At HartfordAt New YorkAt M. A. C.At M. A. C.At MiddletownAt CambridgeAt DurhamAt HanoverAt M. A. C.At SpringfieldAt M. A. C.At ProvidenceAt M. A. C. can you remember the time when Jimmie Bower took an all-night rest underthe floor? Can you remember the time when Mat Jameson took an alarm time clock to churchand had it stop in the exact middle of the priests sermon. Do y

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Identifier: n11rodgun10cana
Title: Rod and weapon
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Writers: Canadian Forestry Association
Subjects: Fishing Hunting Outdoor life
Publisher: Beaconsfield, Que. [etc.] Rod and Gun Pub. Co. [etc.]
Adding Library: Gerstein – University of Toronto
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r. McKenzie 15, A. Baltzer 19, N. C. Wigle16, W. A. Smith 19, Gordon Wigle 14, ByronWigle 18, Jack Miner 16, Dorz Wijgle 18, T.Pastorious 19, O. Ferguson 18. Total 2011.Average 67 per cent. KI NGSVILLE-HARROW TEAM SHOOT-IN FULL SWING. Dartmouth Doings the normal monthly shoot of Dartmouth(N.S.) Gun Club happened on their ground-,on Wednesday, Feb. 4th. The day had been bittercold, not much above zero. There clearly was nowind, however the brilliant sun from the snowfall ended up being veryhard on the eyes and incredibly unusual shootingresulted. Ratings:— 10 20 10 20 SA. B. B. T. Egan 4 12 8 12 60 36 H. Greene 6 14 5 15 60 40 G. Mclnnes 8 15 6 9 60 38 F. Monahan t ,2 5 6 12 60 25 H. D. Romans 7 14 9 15 60 45 A. M. Stewart 6 13 7 15 60 41 Handicap event No. 4 resulted in a tie be-tween Greene, Monahan, Romans, Stewart.Romans won aside, making an extra knee onThermos Bottle reward. Romans also won themonthly large average badge, with 75 per cent.,which is considerably below present propels, thethe laot two being 90 and 80 %.

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A number of Canadian Shooters whom attended the Hamilton Tournament in Janu-ary. G. M. Dunk, G. J. Mason, G. L. Vivian, Walter Ewing. Phil Wakefield,Joe Jennings, Ted Marsh, E. H. Houghten, Winnipeg. Phil Wakefield is showingVivian the Imperial layer with that he made a straight score into the Grand CanadianHandicap. Walter Ewing is mischievously keeping another layer over Vivians mind. Hamilton HappeningsTnere was a turn-out in the regular■hoot on Saturday, Feb. 8th, associated with the HamiltonGun Club. The Wind becoming extremely high, it wasalmost impossible to make great results. Themembers were shooting for the trophy givenby Klein & Binkley, for a series of six regular■hoots. Mr. John Hunter made a. very credit-able rating, twenty-one from 20 yard markgiving him a lead of three wild birds over his near-est competitor, at this stage regarding the competition. Inthe spoon shoot, Mr. Hunteit also won in Aclass, Mr. H. Marsh in B course, and Mr. FredOliver in C course. The Buffalo Audubon GunClub members tend to be com

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Image from page 690 of “Harper’s brand new Monthly mag Volume 21 June to November 1860” (1860)
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Title: Harper’s Brand new Monthly mag Volume 21 June to November 1860
12 Months: 1860 (1860s)
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s to never be beat.It trampled North under base: it beat the stiffneck associated with younger Pitt: even his infection neverconquered that indomitable nature. As soon ashis brain ended up being obvious it resumed the plan, onlylaid aside whenever their explanation left him: as soon ashis arms were out of the strait-waistcoat theytook within the pen together with program which had engagedhim up to the minute of their malady. I believeit is by people thinking on their own inside rightthat nine-tenths regarding the tyranny of this world hasbeen perpetrated. Arguing thereon convenientpremiss, the Dey of Algiers would stop twentyheads of a morning; Father Dominic would burna score of Jews into the presence of the most extremely Cath-olic King, therefore the Archbishops of Toledo andSalamanca sing Amen. Protestants were roast-! ed, Jesuits hung and quartered at Smithfield,we and witches burned at Salem, and all sorts of by wortliypeople, just who thought they had the greatest authorityi for actions. And so, with regards to old! George, also People in america, whom he hated and

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LOBD NOKTU. [After Gilray.] ME. FOX. THE FOUR GEOHGES. 070 whom conquered him, can provide him credit forhaving very truthful cause of oppressing them.Appended to Lord Broughams biographicalsketch of Lord North are a handful of autograph notesof the king, which let us many curiously into thestate of his mind. The times certainly re-quire, states he, the concurrence of whowish to avoid anarchy. I’ve no wish butthe success of my very own dominions, therefore Imust look upon all who does maybe not heartily assistme as bad guys, along with bad subjects. Thatis the way in which he reasoned. I wish nothing butgood, therefore every guy Avho does not agreeAvith myself is a traitor and a scoundrel. Remem-ber that he thought himself anointed by a Divinecommission; keep in mind that he had been a guy ofslow components and imperfect education; that thesame terrible might of Heaven which placed a crownupon their head, which made him tender to hisfamily, pure inside the life, courageous and truthful,made him lifeless of understanding, obstinate ofwill

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Identifier: annualreport00ocea_0
Title: Annual report
Year: 1869 (1860s)
Authors: Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association
Subjects: Methodist Episcopal Church
Publisher: [Ocean Grove, N.J.] : Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association of the Methodist Episcopal Church
Contributing Library: New Jersey State Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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in the county or state. There are 118 arc lights, and they ran a total of 815 hours.135 new poles were erected. The commercial lights ran 1,081hours 45 minutes, and made 45,233 ampere hours. Lights werein Auditorium 44 nights, and ran 108 hours, averaging 860 lightsper night. Coal consumption for the past four years is as follows: Same period, 1894, – – ,500 1895, – – 4,700 1896, – – 2,000 1897, 2,200 Your committee have given much time, attention and careto the water and light systems and the constantly-recurring ques-tions incident to them, and are gratified to report that the plantsare in excellent condition and repair. The committee also desire at this time to express their sin-cere appreciation of the faithful and intelligent labors of ourchief-engineer, Mr. Turner, to our electrician, and both of theirassistants. You will observe, from the financial statement, that the totalreceipts for the year for water and electric light are ,404, and TWENTY ITY-EIGHTH ANNUM. REPORT. 63

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OCEA. N GROVE WATER-WORKS. 64 OCEAN GROVE, N. J. that the total expenses for both plants were ,,637 ; which,after crediting for street lighting ,250, Auditorium and publicbuildings ,000, and water for street sprinkling ,000, and allow-ing six per cent, interest on cost of both plants, we have a profitof 176/1000 of one per cent. This is getting profit down to finefigures ; but we must remember this class of street lighting wouldbe cheap at per lamp per year. This item would make thestreet lighting cost over ,000, while we have credited only,250. Observe also that over one hundred million gallons of waterare wasted per year. This loss charged at the rate of seven centsper thousand gallons would be ,000. This great waste is dueto defective plumbing, carelessness on the part of consumers, andthe absence of water meters. All of which is respectfully submitted by your committee foryour consideration and approval. T. J. Preston, A. H. De Haven, John E. Andrus. Licenses.â

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Image from page 14 of “Haverford College Athletic Annual and 1900 Class book” (1900)
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Identifier: haverfordcollege1900have
Title: Haverford College Athletic Annual and 1900 Class book
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Haverford College. Class of 1900
Subjects: Haverford College – Students – Yearbooks
Publisher: Haverford, Pa : Haverford College
Contributing Library: Haverford College Library, Quaker and Special Collections
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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Part I. ATHLETIC ANNUAL Edited bv James A. Babbitt. M.D.Part H. SENIOR CLASS BOOK Edited bv the Class of /goo

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N attempt was made in 1899 to makethe Athletic Annual more trulyindicative of general college life by theaddition of College and Class Depart-ments. This met with such approval thatwe have taken a step farther and assignedone half the space to the Senior Class tobe edited as a Senior Class Book in accord-ance with the custom of many of oursister institutions. This Department has been conducted bythe Class Committee entirely indepen-dently, and all credit or responsibility mustbe given to them alone. We trust our many friends and Alumniwill give this yearly report, now publishedfor the seventh time, the same cordialgreeting as in former years, and considerany failures of the present year as pre-paratory efforts for a strong athletic future. The editor would express his appreciationof the work of the Class of 1900 in prepa-ration of their department, and also renderthanks to Mr. Chase for photographicassistance. J. A. B. HaverfordCollegeJune I, igoo

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Identifier: legislativeregul00wang
Title: Legislative regulation of railway finance in England
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Wang, Ching-Chun, 1883-
Subjects: Railroads and state Railroads Theses
Publisher:
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
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ed intosome participation in their faults. In the midst of this chaos,a royal commission was appointed to examine the whole matter,with a view toward Government purchase as a solution of the pro-blem. Parliament intended to postpone 2,11 action until thecommission had finished its work; but the prevailing difficulties made early action necessary. Therefore, in 1866 the Railway 2 Companies Securities Act was passed for the purpose of remedyingthe situation. By 1867 the panic subsided; but the old ominous contro-versy over the nature and value of railway securities was stillrife. In fact it held all other financial matters in abeyance. Of the aggregate railway capital of about 1450,000,000 more than 27^ 3 represented debenture debts, the number of investors in such se- 4 curities numbered no less than 100,000. 1. Economist, 1866, pp. 1484-1485. 2. 29 & 30, V. c. 108. See Chapter on Registration of RailwyaSecurities. 3. London Times, Feb. 6, 1867, p. 9. 4. Hansard,, vol. 185, p. 297.

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Meanwhile it became clear that the current belief was that a man lending money upon a debenture, lent it upon a mortgage not only of the income, but also the property of a railway company. But this belief was shattered by the decision of the Lord Justice in 1 the London, Chatham and Dover Companys land case, in which theprinciple governing the question was laid down at some length andwith great perspicuity. It was held that the holders of railwaydebentures were not only without any immediate hold on the generalproperty of the undertaking as distinguished from its income, butwere not entitled to any claim to the rents or proceeds from thesale of the companys Burplus land. In other words, the debenture-holders had only a hold on the tolls and earnings of the line andnot on the property of the company. The whole question seemed tohave turned on the interpretation given to the word undertakingin the security which the debenture-holders received for theirmoney. The popular idea was that by

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Identifier: greatamericanboo01mabi
Title: The great American book of biography
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Mabie, Hamilton Wright, 1846-1916 Garnett, William, 1850- [from old catalog] Thomas, Allen Clapp, 1846- [from old catalog] Ellis, Edward Sylvester, 1840- [from old catalog] Birdsall, William Wilfred. [from old catalog] Johnson, Willis Fletcher, 1857-1931 Willard, Frances E. (Frances Elizabeth), 1839-1898 International publishing company, Philadelphia. [from old catalog]
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Publisher: Philadelphia and Chicago, International publishing company
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s,and tried to shield themselves under the cloak of patriotism and loyalty to theUnion. When threatened with exposure and punishment, such men of coursesought to make the party responsible for their deeds, and to involve it in the 438 JAMES G. BLAINE. consequences. The result was the era of scandal of Grants second adminis-tration, when the Credit Mobilier, the Whiskey Ring frauds, and theBelknap episode were brought to light. A passion for investigation fol-lowed. Every prominent public man who manifested any unwillingness to havehis private affairs made public fell under suspicion. Mr. Blaine was too shininga mark to be missed. He was accused of having been bribed with a gift of|Little Rock and Fort Smith railroad bonds, by the Union Pacific Railroad Com-pany, when Speaker of the House, to give a decision favoring that company.He was accused of steaHnsf letters—his own letters—which would have incrim-inated him ; and for years he was pursued with charges of various sorts of cor-

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\V\S1I1M.1N A.NU JKFFEKSON COLLEGE, WASH 1 .\i. 1 ■ ..\. lA. ruption. These charges he completely disproved on the floor of the House,showing that he had bought the bonds, and had lost over ,000 by theirpurchase. After meeting and disproving the slanders against him, he said:— Having now noticed the two charges that have been so extensively circu-lated, I shall refrain from calling the attention of the House to any others thatmay be invented. To quote the language of another, I do not propose tomake my public life a perpetual and unconifortable ilea-hunt, in the vain effortsto run down stories which have no basis in truth, which are usually anonymous,and whose total refutation brings no punishment to those who have beenguilt) of originating them. INGERSOLLS SPEECH. 439 The first charge against him, however, served its purpose. It was made ashort time before the Repubhcan convention of 1876, when Blaine was the mostprominent candidate for the Presidential nomination. For several

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Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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25

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rc 26 property by means of false or fraud-ulent pretenses, representations, orpromises, transmits or causes to betransmitted by means of wire, radio,or television communication in in-terstate or foreign commerce, anywritings, signs, signals, pictures, orsounds for the purpose of executingsuch scheme or artifice, shall befined not more than ,000 or im-prisoned not more than five years,or both. Looking at the problem from theBell System point of view, toll fraudcan be divided into three separatecategories: 1) fraudulent use ofelectronic devices to illegally enterthe telephone network, 2) fraudu-lent use of telephone credit cards,3) fraudulent use of third-numberbilling. Bell System losses from creditcard and third number cheatsamounted to .5 million in 1971while losses incurred from elec-tronic fraud are almost impossibleto estimate with any degree of ac-curacy. A closer look at each type oftoll fraud may show that each mustbe dealt with as a separate problemwith different solution

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Identifier: publichealthnurs63nati
Title: Public wellness nursing assistant quarterly
12 Months: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: National Organization for Public Health Nursing (U.S.)
Topics: Public health nursing
Publisher: Baltimore, Md. : National Company for Public Wellness Nursing
Adding Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
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COMPLETE cost savings deposited around are secured by very first mort-gages on Cleveland property. We make financial loans tohelp build or purchase HOMES. THE EQUITY SAVINGS & LOAN COMPANY 5701 EUCLID AVENUE, CLEVELAND, O. Hospital Laboratory Apparatus

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Title: Public wellness nurse quarterly
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Writers: National Organization for Public Wellness Nursing (U.S.)
Subjects: Public wellness medical
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COMPLETE cost savings deposited with us are guaranteed by very first mort-gages on Cleveland property. We make financial loans tohelp develop or buy HOMES. THE EQUITY SAVINGS & LENDER 5701 EUCLID AVENUE, CLEVELAND, O. Hospital Laboratory Apparatus

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InternationalInstrument Co. Cambridge, Mass. SCHUEMANN-JONES COMPANY 738 Prospect Ave., S. E., Cleveland, O. DEALER IN Surgical Instruments, Eiectrical merchandise and Hospital Supplies of most types Trusses, Crutches, followers, Elastic Stockings, Artificial Limbs and Eyes anything for Sick Room Lady in Attendance Phones: Bell Main 1392; Mail Nrders offered Special Attention Cuy. Cen. 6261-W North 881 Cent. 180 HOGAN & CO. 1345 better Ave.Ambulance, Invalid Carriage CLEVELANDS Prescription Drug StoresThe Mayell & Hopp Co. 1104 and 10512 Euclid Ave. COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA Post Graduate program in public areas wellness benefit nurses at theHenry Phipps Institute in association with all the Visiting Nurse Societyof Philadelphia, will open October 1, 1914. Several scholarshipsare readily available. Entrance blanks and outline for the curriculum will besent on request to Miss M. Lehmann, Superintendent, The Visiting Nurse community, 1340 lombard-street, Philadelphio. Miss A. K. Sutton, Superinte

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Title: Public health nurse quarterly
12 Months: 1913 (1910s)
Writers: National Business for Public Health Nursing (U.S.)
Topics: Public health medical
Publisher: Baltimore, Md. : Nationwide Company for Public Health Nursing
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COMPLETE LINE OFSurgical Instruments, Dressings, Trusses,Supports, Deformity Apparatus, Sick RoomSupplies of all of the Kinds. TflP H H Hpcdpr Pr» 812 better Avenue-*- 11C !!• -LJ-* lltoolCl vjU» one shop only Cleveland, O, ^^^H^^JS^ ^^■^^^™ CANFIELDS CERTIFIED DAIRY Produced under the guidance of MedicalMilk Commission of town of Cleveland. WRITTEN BY Walker-Gordon Laboratory Dept. AND CLOVERDALE DAIRY CO.L THE KORNER & WOOD CO. Books, Stationery, Pictures,Picture Framing. ^ 737 EUCLID AVENUE. ^) NURSES CHECKING OUT SITUATIONS We make to purchase to suit this work you’re engaged in a myriad of Cases and Bags for Bottles, Bandages and tools. See united states for Bags, Trunks, match situations and all forms of Traveling gear. The Likly & Rockett Trunk Co. 405 Superior Ave. N. W. 501 Prospect Ave. S. E. 46-48 Euclid Arcade fOUR cost savings deposited with us are seat purple by very first morl-gages on Cleveland property. We make financial loans tohelp develop or get HOMES. THE EQUITY SA

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Image from page 104 of “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 104 December 1901 to May 1902” (1902)

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Image from page 104 of “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 104 December 1901 to May 1902” (1902)
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Identifier: harpersnew0104various
Title: Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 104 December 1901 to May 1902
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: various
Subjects:
Publisher: New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University-Idaho

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onder-ing what theyhad to do onearth. A fewstarved dogs,short of ear andtail, are dozingon the pave-ment, and a manin shoes is no-ticed by hisheavier footfall,the majority pa-cing along withghostly noiseless-ness. It is therattling, shabbyequipage, afterall, that is thespasmodic dis-turber of thisunique dream-world; it breaksin on the peaceof a whole neigh-borhood likestage – thunder,tears along anddisappears like acyclone, markingits track with thewrecks of brokensleep and shat-tered dreams.Presently an ele-gant turnout brings in sight a lady dressed in the latestParisian fashion, at the side of a gentle-man in faultless attire. This is varied bya beggar or two, whose pitiful appearancemore than his appeal moves you to lookfor your coppers. The eye lights on abasket filled with those Azorean orangesof which so much is heard; you pick outa few of the Hesperian apples; the boynames three hundred rets as the price,arid you drop the fruit in astonishment.At the hotel a stunning sensation

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A St. Michafi. Farmfr and his Wifk comes at the sound of the amount to bepaid for the accommodation. For two ina room, three thousand rets a day. Hea-vens! with a letter of credit of a shorttwo thousand, in the pocket, you startto compute how many hours you couldstand it in the Fortunate Islands be-fore landing in bankruptcy. The result isa revelation. Having fathomed the valueof the rei, you stand revealed to yourselfas a multi-millionaire. Two thousanddollars exceed three million re is. 88 HARPEKS MONTHLY MAGAZINE. The general impression made by theAzores is that a piece of the enchanted,slumbering Orient has by a miracle beentransplanted to be disenchanted in thisunclassic quarter of the world. At everyturn the Semitic type faces you in castsof countenances either Moorish or strong-ly Jewish. For once you behold Rome,Jerusalem, and Mecca kneeling in millen-nial harmony before the cross. How thiscame to pass need hardly be told. Spainand Portugal have too long intermingledwith the S

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Image from page 10 of “Hudson & Manhattan tunnels : uniting New York and New Jersey in picture and story.” (1908)
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Identifier: hudsonmanhattant00durs
Title: Hudson & Manhattan tunnels : uniting New York and New Jersey in picture and story.
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Durst, Seymour B., 1913-, former owner. NNC
Subjects: Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corporation Hudson and Manhattan Railroad Company Tunnels
Publisher: New York : American Photograph Co.
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
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iver from ^.ortlandt street, New Yorkto Jersey City, thence connecting with the terminals of the Pennsylvania, Erie andDelaware, Lackawanna and Western railroads, from whence there extend under theHudson two other tunnels to Christopher street, New York, thence to and up, Sixthavenue as far as Thirty-third street)—will for years, if not for ages, stand asthe greatest engineering feat undertaken by man. Haskins 1874 Tunnel. The idea of tunneling under the Hudson river had its con-ception in the fertile brain of Colonel D. C. Haskins, an English civil engineer of consid-erable note and ability, in 1874, and he set about organizing a company to finance andbore the tunnel, and after arduous labor, and much persuasion succeeded in interestingabout two millions of dollars of New York capital in his undertaking. He began workin 1878, and had constructed one thousand, two hundred fifty feet of tunnel, when acave-in of the roof sheathing, in 1880, drowned twenty-one men in the air-locks. The

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And await the arrival of our train which is to whirl us through the tunnel. money having been all expended, and further financial aid being lacking, the companywas forced to abandon the enterprise in that year. A New Company. Colonel Haskins, having failed in his attempt to interest addi-tional American capital in his enterprise went to England, where he succeeded inobtaining about two millions of dollars of English money, and a new company wasorganized to take over the franchise, and other assets of the old company. ColonelHaskins in resuming his self-imposed task of uniting New Jersey and Manhattan Islandby an sub-aqueous route had in mind the establishment of a mammoth terminal stationon a site in close proximity to Washington Square, where railroad trains from everysection of the country could discharge passengers and freight. In 1890 the new company, after pushing the tube one thousand, eight hundred feetfurther along toward New York, fell into bankruptcy, and work was again stop

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Image from page 388 of “Wild Spain … records of sport with rifle, rod, and gun, natural history and exploration” (1893)
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Title: Wild Spain … records of sport with rifle, rod, and gun, natural history and exploration
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Chapman, Abel, 1851-1929 Buck, Walter John
Subjects: Hunting — Spain Game and game-birds — Spain
Publisher: London, Gurney and Jackson
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
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^ as a Spanish sheep andvoracious as a hyena, would simply put him out of themarket, and eventually land him in bankruptcy. ButSpain cares nothing for modern ideas, and disdains toput herself about in the universal race for wealth. Thereis dignity in her attitude, but there is at least a suspicion

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LAMMERGEYER—A FIRST IMPRESSION. of lassitude. Wliere Nature is prodigal, man becomesproportionately apathetic. Here her gifts more thansuftice for simple tastes and day-to-day requirements, andthe rural Andaluz seeks no more. In agriculture, stock-raising, and other pastoral pursuits,the rudiments of modern system—drainage, irrigation,and the like—are ignored. In the burning heats ofsummer, when every green thing is scorched to death, thecattle die l)}- hundreds from thirst and want of pasturage; 296 WILD SPAIN. in winter, when plains are flooded, and valleys water-logged, the death-rate from cold, want, and disease ishardly less heavy than that of summer. Small wonderthe great bare-necked scavengers of Natm*e increase andflomish. Passing, beneath the twin crags of Las Dos Hermanas,we struck the course of the Majaceite, whose rushingstream, embowered amidst magnificent oleanders, lookedmore like trout than anything we had then seen in thesesierras. Among the mountain streams abo

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Image from web page 168 of “Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago” (1921)

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Image from web page 168 of “Olcott’s land values blue guide of Chicago” (1921)
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Identifier: olcottslandvalue181928geoc
Title: Olcott’s land values blue guide of Chicago
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Geo. C. Olcott & Co
Subjects: Real home Real property Real residential property Real home Zoning
Publisher: Chicago : Geo. C. Olcott
Contributing Library: The Newberry Library
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of educational and analysis Libraries in Illinois

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Page 43 OLCOTTS LAND VALUES BLUE BOOK MEMORANDA 36 Pa^e 28 v3o >30 Oo OO >3 O OO 05 ^O therefore 2i ■^OOOO |at^raba>ntS^StH^ratH<Ht 0 CARMEN – c OAKS GrOLF uu m- uu i coo 35 ^O ED CD IZZI z cm Z CD 2 CZD Z cm z IZZI ZCCI zCaaJs I 4S 4.0 40 4-0 4-0 40 40 st|^-^-^^^ SUNNY5l<OE AGATITE FOf

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Page 45 OLCOTTS LAND STANDARDS BLUE BOOK Albert J. Ross Frank C. Voisinet R. H. Thomas, Jr. = (»^ Ray W. Summe Ray M. Fouts Central InvestmentCompany Second Mortgages Construction financing property Contracts Refinancing 5613 Lawrence Avenue PALISADE 6000 CS88S®8g8S888®SS8SSgS®®8SSS®88S88S888gSS888SS3g®888?!?< Webpage 29 37

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Image from page 170 of “Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago” (1921)
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Identifier: olcottslandvalue181928geoc
Title: Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago
12 Months: 1921 (1920s)
Writers: Geo. C. Olcott & Co
Subjects: Real home Real home Real property Real property Zoning
Publisher: Chicago : Geo. C. Olcott
Contributing Library: The Newberry Library
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and analysis Libraries in Illinois

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Page 45 OLCOTTS LAND STANDARDS BLUE BOOK Albert J. Ross Frank C. Voisinet R. H. Thomas, Jr. = (»^ Ray W. Summe Ray M. Fouts Central InvestmentCompany 2nd Mortgages Construction debts Real Estate Contracts Refinancing 5613 Lawrence Avenue PALISADE 6000 CS88S®8g8S888®SS8SSgS®®8SSS®88S88S888gSS888SS3g®888?!?< Page 29 37

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yfi^nn^nfi mn nn^m^nn^ U 70 1 75 1 E 1 1 WIL-SON 75 0 0 3 0 0 0 C i S[^>^ CD^im (0 (fl §U UU Ul 0 ro fo rt P oULI ULI UU UL 1 c a ^^o J( 1 ? 3^ Z< 1 0 ^, 00 0 ^5 1 v^ D $ ^ i.2 czi izzT tz: mi CD ED cn im ds OO too too loo loo lOO AV (ZD CZD CZI fi PEINSACOLA S5 AV c u Li_ DM PI nn nn nn 0 0 P in 1 ? in /..

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Image from page 31 of “Hastings’ seeds : spring 1915 catalogue” (1915)

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Identifier: hastingsseedsspr1915hgha
Title: Hastings’ seeds : spring 1915 catalogue
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: H.G. Hastings Co H.G. Hastings Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection
Subjects: Nurseries (Horticulture) Catalogs Vegetables Seeds Catalogs Flowers Seeds Catalogs Fruit Seeds Catalogs
Publisher: Atlanta, Ga. : H.G. Hastings & Co.
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

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fine in heavy storms. MortgageLifter makes 37 to 40 per cent lint which, combined with its heavybearing qualities, makes it one of the most valuable varieties. Plant grows large and strong, roots deep and is a wonderful drought resister. It is the only highly bred up variety of largewhite seeded, extra big-boll cotton offered for sale. Has the longestof lint and has brought as high as M\:j cents as against a generalmarket price of >>.2 cents. On upland either rich or poor you will find Mortgage Lifter asplendid variety. Pound, postpaid, 35 cents; 3 pounds, postpaid, to your address, .00; peck, by ex-press or freight, not prepaid, 60 cents; bushel (30 pounds Georgia legal weight), notprepaid, .75; 10 bushels, not prepaid, .00; 100 pounds, not prepaid, S5.00.Freight rate to Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma points is .08 per 100 pounds. PRICES 2G H. G. Hastings Sf Co., Seedsmen, Atlanta, Georgia. MATCHLESS EXTRA EARLY BIG BOLL A SURE ENOUGH BOLL WEEVIL BEATING BIG BOLL COTTON

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Kings Extra Early Hastings Matchless Extra Early Big Boll Cotton A standard extra early variety; close. Makes 30 to 35 per cent lint. Our seed Is grown in extremeNorth Georgia and is the real genuine King. Pound, postpaid, 20c;3 pounds, 50c. Not prepaid, peck, 50c; bushel, .25; 10 bushels,.00; 100 pounds, .00. Write for prices on larger quantities.RllSSell Bit? Boll n late variety; 85 to 90 per cent ■ green seed. Strong, vigorous grower, hut very late and should not be planted in any section where easi-ness of crop is desired. Pound, postpaid, 20c; 3 pounds, 50c; peck,not prepaid, 50c; bushel, .25; 10 bushels, .00; 100 pounds, .00.Write for special prices on larger quantities. We introduced this superb new cotton lastyear and reports coming to us from practicallyevery cotton-growing state are unusually fa-vorable. Our illustration does not do it jus-tice. We have been growing and watching itin field culture ever since 1910 and every yearwe are more and more pleased wit

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Image from page 10 of “Pittston gazette centennial hand-book, 1778-1878 : one hundredth anniversary of the battle and massacre of Wyoming, July 3 & 4, 1878 : containing a complete historical sketch of Wyoming Valley ..” (1878)
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Identifier: pittstongazettec00gaze
Title: Pittston gazette centennial hand-book, 1778-1878 : one hundredth anniversary of the battle and massacre of Wyoming, July 3 & 4, 1878 : containing a complete historical sketch of Wyoming Valley ..
Year: 1878 (1870s)
Authors: Gazette Print. (Firm : Pittston, Pa.) D. Davidsburg (Firm : Wilkes-Barre, Pa.)
Subjects: Wyoming Massacre, 1778
Publisher: Pittston, Pa. : Gazette Print.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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JLl, GAZETTE BUILDING, iFITTSTOIsT, :Eu^., Does Job Printing of all kinds, and keeps on hand a full supply of Stationery for all kinds of work. OQilETIl y fill ?ieis iMiis, DEEDS, MORTGAGES, NOTES, &C., FOR SALE. —Prints to Order- LETTER HEADS,ENVELOPES, BILL HEADS, STATEMENTS,CIRCULARS, BALL PROGRAMMES,DODGERS, PROGRAMMES, INVITATIONS.BALL TICKETS,POSTERS. PAPER BOOKS,AT LOWEST CASH RATES. ESTIMATES FURNISHED, f, SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. ® (6) 1^1!^. AUKmEN.

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» Carries a Full Stock of Eyei\ythingIN THE -Rai^p^^ai^e Line. ifS ^^ p, Kf eiF ALREADY GROUND FOR IMMEDIATE USE. The ^^Bristor Grain Cradk M ¥ FWEEM AMI A ^<. Best quality Goods of standard malies at prices to suit the times, (7)

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Image from page 346 of “Our firemen. A history of the New York fire departments, volunteer and paid … 650 engravings; 350 biographies.” (1887)

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Image from page 346 of “Our firemen. A history of the New York fire departments, volunteer and paid … 650 engravings; 350 biographies.” (1887)
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Identifier: ourfiremenhistor00cost
Title: Our firemen. A history of the New York fire departments, volunteer and paid … 650 engravings; 350 biographies.
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Costello, Augustine E.
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, A. E. Costello
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: The Durst Organization

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lIt K I R K M K N. 311 tbfl most elevated grounds. The company made several attempts to procurewater, but I>eing satisfied by their experiments of tin; impracticability of tin:undertaking, the concern fell through. In L825 five additional cisterns were ordered to be constructed. In conse-quence of a serious (ire in the Eighth Ward, tbe lire companies were orderedto 1111 all the public cisterns with water. Two years later (IS.*;) seven addi-tional cisterns were ordered ; eighteen more in 1828, and sixteen additionalones in 1829. The city then possessed forty public cisterns, at an estimatedCOBl of twenty-four thousand dollars. Each cistern contained usually aboutone hundred hogsheads of water. But the supply of water was neverthelessinsufficient. At least sixty additional cisterns were required for that portionof the city between Fourteenth and Grand Streets on Broadway, and Four-teenth and Pearl Streets on Chatham Street, and on the east side. It was

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THIRTEENTH STREET RESERVOIR AND WASHINGTON INSTITUTE.[Thirteenth Street and Fourth Avenue.] therefore recommended that the city lay down two lines of iron pipe, for thesecurity of the city in the section mentioned The firemen built a cistern under the entrance-way to the Old FiremensHall in Fulton Street. This was the first cistern ever built in the city, andcontained a hundred hogsheads of water. Engine Companies Nos. 13, 18, 21,and -J4 share the credit of this work. Much disagreement and dissension appear to have prevailed amongcitizens and officials as to the propriety of making the cost of constructingcisterns a public charge. Fully a year had been occupied with such dissen-sions, when, finally, on March 29, 1827, the Committee on Assessments of theCommon Council reported favorably for making the cost of cisterns a publiccharge. This report was negatived. Public cisterns were, however, estab-lished for the use of the Department, some twenty-five additional having beenerected up to

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Image from web page 75 of “Goaks and tears” (1875)

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Image from page 75 of “Goaks and rips” (1875)
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Identifier: goakstears00quad
Title: Goaks and rips
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: Quad, M., 1842-1924
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston, H.L. Shepard & Co.
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Roman nose, carried on the complete stranger; thou canst perhaps not say i will be a lord or a duke in disguise. And I dont care a cent! Are you going to spend ? Was we planning to change these fragments of lumber into silver? queriedthe complete stranger, while he organized some pine tooth-picks. The clerk arrived associated with the workplace,— obtaining the lean satchel in hishand,— and then he took the stranger to the home, banged him with greatgood will, and pointed up the road. I-go, stated the person, in a solemn vocals, nevertheless when my retainersarrive I shall seek revenge — human being gore will probably be shed to satisfyme! NOVEMBER. 67 you wish to gore right-away from right here — quick–smart! ex-claimed the clerk. He moved. Their face was clouded for a moment, but then a grand smilecovered it, and then he ended a newsboy and asked,— My faithful minion, canst thou direct us to an office across doorof which hangs the traditionary golden balls of base money-lender— a place where i might exchange several precious heirlooms for some viledross? Plus the son performed.

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Twelvth Mo7ith. DECEMBER. 31 Days. Sunday 3 | lo | 17 | 24 | 31 Monday 4 | 11 | 18 | 25 | Diesday 5 | 12 | 19 | 26 | Wedtiesday 6 | 13 | 20 | 27 | Thursday 7 | 14 | 21 | 28 | Friday i| 8I15I22I29I Saturday 2 | 9 | 16 | 23.I 30 | Nevada saloon – keeperscommence to saw their particular whis-key into ten-cent chunks. Don Quixote came to be inthis month. Final guy gets away fromSaratoga, plus the bell-boysgo up to the store to hurry-up those diamond pins. Fire businesses satisfy and declare the period features established betterthan could have been expected. People who got drunk on election day are now able to turn a cornerwithout moving off the sidewalk. DouBTABiLiTiES.— ist to 3d.— Buy Lake Shore. 3d to fifth.— Grease the doorsteps and get ready for business. fifth to nth.—Mother-in-law begins to develop sassy. Dogs howlmournfully. Look out for storms on Lake Erie. Old women begin toremember the Morgan excitement. 5th to 9th.— Stable your ducks. 9th to sixteenth.— Frost begins to spook

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Image from web page 59 of “The normal history of Uk birds, or, A selection of the absolute most rare, gorgeous and interesting birds which inhabit this nation : the information from Systema naturae of Linnaeus : with basic findings, often original
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Title: The all-natural reputation for Uk birds, or, an array of probably the most rare, beautiful and interesting birds which inhabit this nation : the explanations through the Systema naturae of Linnaeus : with basic findings, either initial or collected from newest and a lot of esteemed English ornithologists : and adorned with figures, drawn, engraved, and coloured from initial specimens
12 Months: 1794 (1790s)
Authors: Donovan, E. (Edward), 1768-1837 Latham, John, 1740-1837 Pennant, Thomas, 1726-1798 Gilbert, Richard, 1794-1852, printer Donovan, E. (Edward), 1768-1837. Normal history of the nests and eggs of Brit wild birds Linné, Carl von, 1707-1778. Systema naturae. Regnum animale F. and C. Rivington (Firm), writer F., C. and J. Rivington (company), writer Law and Gilbert, printer R. & R. Gilbert (Firm), printer Leverian Museum (London, The United Kingdomt)
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: London : Printed for the writer, and for F. and C. Rivington …
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity History Library

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age Hawk. Edw. 225. male.Hen-harrier. Pennants Brit. Appliance N° 58. /, 28*Lath. Gen. Syn. I. p. 88. 74, F 3U PLATE LIX. Le Lanier cendre. Brif. orn. I. p. 365. N° 17.Le Foucon a Collier. Do. 1. />. 345. N° 7. ;»#&.LOifTeau St. Martin. Buff. oif. 1. />. 212.—PL enl 459.Grau-weiiTe Geyer. Frijch. I. 79. 80,Rubetarius. TurnerL numerous authors have fuppofed the Ring-tail is the female of theHen-harrier, but Mr. Pennant does not fubfcribe for this generalopinion ; he obferves regarding the Ring-tail, from fome belated obferva-tions by the infallible rule of diffe&ion, males have already been discovered ofthis fpecies. And Mr. Latham, after noticing the viewpoint ofPennant, fays, for this I may include my personal obfervations; theBird we today polfefs, as an Englijh fpecimen, becoming fet straight down in mynotes as a male. The Hen-harrier is extremely deftructive on young chicken, fkimsthe surface with regards to flies, and will not perch on trees. Lengthfeventeen ins, breadth three feet three ins^ body weight twelveounces. PLATE 6o

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PLATE LX. MOTACILLA RUBETRA. WHINCHAT. Passe res.Bill conic, pointed, Noftrils oval, wide, naked. GENERIC CHARACTER. Bill ftrait, {lender. Tongue jagged. PARTICULAR CHARACTER AND STNO NTMS. Above reddifh brown, with dark fpots. Beneath reddifh yellow,a white flroke over the eye, and a broad one below it. Two whitefpots regarding wings. Upper half the tail white, reduced 1 / 2 black.Bill, mouth and legs black. Motacilla Rubetra. Lin. Syji. Nat. i. 186, 18. edit. 10.^ Scop. Ann. i. N° 237.Kram. eh p. 375. N° 5,Whinchat. Rati Syn. p. 76. A. 3.Will. Orn. p. 22J.Penn. Brit. Z00L I. I.Lath. Gen. Syn. 4. 454. 54. Le PLATE LX. Lc grand Traquet, ou le Tarier. Brif. orn. 3. p, 432. N° 26. pi 24./. 1. Buff. off. 5. p. 224.—PL enl 678. /. 2.Geftettenfehlagar. j£r«w. 375.Groffer Fliegenfuenger. Frijch. f. 22. It is a typical Bird in mod: areas of Europe. In Englandit is feen when you look at the North just in fummer ; however in the South it con-tinues the whole year. Its frequently feen in the heaths w

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Image from web page 335 of “Germany;” (1912)
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Identifier: germanypainted00dick
Title: Germany;
12 Months: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Dickie, James F., 1848- Compton, Edward Theodore, ill Compton, E. Harrison (Edward Harrison), sick
Subjects: Germany — information and travel
Publisher: London : A. & C. Black
Adding Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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price right here ended up being the stormiest ofwhich history bears accurate documentation, and underneath the chargeof treason he had been virtually expelled. The city hasseen Gustavus Adolphus and Tilly within its walls.It had additionally a number of visits from Napoleon. Hence ithas a most notable history. From 1816 to 1866 the German Parliament heldits sessions here. Bismarck ended up being probably the most dis-tinguished person in that human body. Through the firstyear of his sojourn the landlord associated with housewhere he lodged took away the dining table bell he usedto phone the servants when he had letters for thepost. He rang therefore frequently that landlord tookthis bold step. When Bismarck had their corre-spondence ready once more become carried into post-office, he fired a pistol. The landlord, alarmedat the loud report, hurried in. Bismarck coollyaddressed him and said, Sir, you took away mybell, I really had recourse into the only strategy ofsummoning a servant that has been left. It’s needlessto state your bell was at as soon as restored to itsplace. COBURG—DUCAL CASTLE AND PARK

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THE LUTHER LAND 135 Bismarck was right here once more on a far more historicoccasion, in May 1871, if the treaty of peacebetween Germany and France had been finalized. Thatnight the fountains in Frankfort ran with wine. Frankfort was long the 2nd mercantile cityof Germany, Hamburg becoming the initial. It hasalways already been the Banking-house and also the ExchangeCity of the Fatherland. In the Juden Gasse theold dwelling-place of Meyer Anselm Bauer, thefounder of famous Rothschild Bank, is stillstanding. Here he established himself as a money-lender on sign Zum rothem Schilde. We haveoften heard a classic lady, who had been created in 1791 andlived till 1882, tell exactly how she had been often withher parent in the little straight back parlour of the home Zum rothem Schilde. She had numerous interestingstories to tell of creator of this Rothschildfortunes. With this humble venture inside JudenGasse sprang the fantastic European Banking-house,without whose help no European energy would cryhavoc and allow slip the puppies of war. Some paces distan

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Image from page 12 of “The training of workers in trades and industries” (1920)

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Identifier: trainingofworker00univ
Title: The training of workers in trades and industries
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: University of Texas at Austin
Subjects: Vocational education
Publisher: Austin : The University
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Pattern Shop—San Antonio men with good trades are hampered in making a livingnowadays. Vocational education creates a demand for and broadensthe field of general education. The Federal and State Governments will help your localboard finance vocational work. The Director of Tradeand Industrial Education will gladly give information re-garding vocational schools of every type, courses of study,equipment, organization, and assist you in finding qualifiedteachers. Remember that classes along the line of general educa-tion can be opened for the young worker who has left schoolbefore completing common school or high school. Theseclasses are usually organized in general continuation schools. The Training of Woi-kers in Trades and Industries 11

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The Dam at Austin Types of Trade and Industrial Schools all-day unit trade schools Aim.—To teach the boy or girl the fundamentals of atrade. Who are the students?—Boys and girls who are not yetemployed, but who wish to learn a trade. When is the school open?—All day, at least five days aweek. Courses vary from one to four years. What subjects are taught? Shop Subjects The Building Trades.Auto Mechanics.Blacksmithing.Sheet Metal Work.Machine Shop Work.Patternmaking.Electrical Work.Dressmaking.Flower and FeatherMaking. Many other trades depending on the local demand,half of each day is spent in the shop. Millinery. Garment Machine Oper-ating. Straw Hat MachineOperating. Gas and Electric Weld-ing. Printing. Painting and Decorating. Bricklaying. One- 12 University of Texas Bulletin

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Image from page 726 of “Daily attractions in New York. Advance information of art exhibitions, lectures, concerts, churches, theatres, railroads, Pullman accommodations, points of interest, where to dine, etc. ..” (1906)
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Identifier: dailyattractions17newy
Title: Daily attractions in New York. Advance information of art exhibitions, lectures, concerts, churches, theatres, railroads, Pullman accommodations, points of interest, where to dine, etc. ..
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Advertising New York (N.Y.) — Guidebooks
Publisher: [New York] Daily attractions in New York (inc.)
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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string QuartetteHarp Trio Piano Trio Open for EnKagemenU (or leadinf andSammer Hotels MISS M. D. GRAZIA PIANIST-DIRCCTOR 63 GRAND ST. JAMAICA, L. I. House—East 149th st., betweenBrobk and Bergen aves. OpensSaturday night, August 30th.H. H. Frazee presents FineFeathers. A modern playwhich takes place in a mod-est Staten Island bungalow—followed in the last scenes inan expensive suburban home. Itis a study of domesticity and AUTOS TO HIRE 6-CYLINDER PIERCE ARROW AND PEERLESS CARS HOUR DAY WEEK OR MONTHRATES ON APPLICATION TELEPHONE, 5052 COLUMBUSPeerless Auto Rental Service 21 DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK

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Sight-SeeingYACHTS Yachts Observation and Tourist all around NewYork Harbor and ManhattanIsland every day at 10.30 a. m,and 2.30 p.m. Yacht HalcyOn makes a trip every day at 1.15 p. m. down the Bayto see the Forts, Sandy Hook, Scotland Lightship, Quarantine and the Ocean, returningat 5 p. m. Both yachts leave from Battery Park Pier, near South Ferry foot ofBroadway. Telephone, Broad 3373. NEW YORK THEATRES-Continued – finance, depicting the usual re- Cort—4<Sth st., east of Broadway. | suit of what happens to thosewho live beyond their income—in this case—a young man andhis wife. The cast includes Rob-ert Edson, Wilton Lackaye, RoseCoghlan, Max Figman, LolitaRobertson, and Amelia Sumers.Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat.,2.15. Prices, 25c. to .Comedy—West 41st St., east ofBway. Tel., 5194 Bryant.Closed.

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Image from web page 182 of “yearly report” (1902)

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Identifier: annualreport891901021newy
Title: Annual report
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: New York (Condition). Forest, Fish and Game Commission
Topics: Forests and forestry Fisheries Game and game-birds
Publisher: [Albany, N.Y. : The Commission]
Adding Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity History Library

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10,000 Lake Trout fry 49,000 Lake Trout fingerlings 1,000 Rainbow Trout fry 12,000 Pike-Perch . . . . ; 300,000 Shad 1,250,000 Smelt 5,160,000 Tomcods 34,700,000 Whitefish 250,000 Total 42,361,800 DELAWARE HATCHERY. Brook Trout fry 95,000 Brook Trout fingerlings 45,500 Brook Trout yearlings 39,000 Brown Trout fry 100,000 Brown Trout fingerlings 72,000 Total 35^,5°° FULTON CHAIN HATCHERY. Brook Trout fry 260,000 Grayling Trout fry 180,000 Rainbow Trout fry 20,000 Frostfish 2,795,000 complete 3,255,000 ONEIDA HATCHERY. Pike-Perch 60,280,000 Whitefish 10,366,000 Complete 70,646,000 WOODLAND, FISH AND GAME COMMISSION.PLEASANT VALLEY HATCHERY. Brook Trout fry 145,000 Brook Trout fingerlings 98,000 Brook Trout yearlings 9,000 Brown Trout fry 165,000 Brown Trout fingerlings 81,000 Brown Trout yearlings . 30,500 Lake Trout fingerlings 47,000 Lake Trout yearlings 48,500 Rainbow Trout fingerlings 32,000 Rainbow Trout yearlings 14,500 Total ……. ..:..:.. . 670,500 Grand total production 140,981,055 153

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Report of tfye Cfyief Game Protector 1903 To tl)e Forest, Pisl) and (iame Commission: GENTLEMEN.— According to your directions We hereby publish areport associated with company of my division for year ending on Septem-ber 30, 1903. It shows the job carried out by the power of protectors inthe bringing of activities, the actual quantity of recoveries in fines and charges, and thetime offered in prison by several people; the number and value of nets and otherdevices for taking of fish which, while used in violation of law, wereseized and ruined; extent gotten the purchase of the timber confiscatedfrom trespassers who had been lumbering on State land, plus the purchase of oldabandoned buildings, and a listing of the licensed nets operated bycommercial anglers, aided by the costs obtained; the amount and value of the fishcaught during the year, along with other matters of great interest. Much credit flow from the Legislature for valuable amendments, passed at thelast session, which secu

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Image from web page 37 of “The Kindergarten magazine” (1891)
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Identifier: kindergartenmaga10chic
Title: The Kindergarten magazine
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Writers:
Subjects: Kindergarten
Publisher: [Chicago, Ill. : Kindergarten Magazine Co.]
Adding Library: National-Louis University Library, Archives and Specialized Choices
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois

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al headquartersduring their particular stay.The Froebel Unionentertained all visit-ing kindergartners ata reception on theevening of Wednes-day, July 7, with MissCaroline T. Havenand Dr. Hailmann asthe leading guests ofthe evening. Mem-bers associated with the WomansClub of the Milwau-kee KindergartenAssociation and ofthe Womans SchoolAlliance assisted atthis reception. Mu-sic had been furnished both for programs of preschool de-partment, as well as the kinder-symphony deserves special men-tion, which was conducted by Miss Kippenberger, theFroebel Union as a body participating in it. MISS MARY C. MCCULLOCH, OF ST. LOUIS, spoke in her own normal impressive way about Idealsto be recognized by the Kindergarten Supervisor, and asa fitting effect skip McCulloch was unanimouslyelected, on suggestion of nomination committee,to act as the kindergarten division president for thecoming 12 months. Skip Caroline T. Haven deserves great credit for havingmade the Kindergarten Department of this N. E. A. success-

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Skip SARAH C. BROOKS. THE KINDERGARTNERS MEET AT MILWAUKEE. 25 ful. We would recommend this lady practical solution to thefuture officers with this division, particularly the giving outof the advance announcement for the system as very early asthe month of April. Toward the close associated with the sessions associated with the kindergartenmeetings at Milwaukee, a few days ended up being specialized in the in-terests regarding the Global Kindergarten Union. The sec-ond yearly report had been look over by the secretary, and copieswere afterward distributed to those current. This reportwill be provided for all limbs ahead of the start of the reg-ular conferences of those businesses. It absolutely was the intention to have abstracts of a number of impor-tant reports of St. Louis conference read at Milwaukee,and these have been duly ready; but owing to the extremeheat plus the lateness of the hour it had been deemed advisable toomit all of them from program. The entire reports of most thepapers will be given, and copies is supposed to be delivered free tomembers of this union. T THE

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Image from page 224 of “[Course catalog]” (1909)

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Identifier: coursecatalog7475nort
Title: [Course catalog]
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Northeastern University (Boston, Mass.) Boston Young Men’s Christian Association Northeastern University Preparatory School (Boston, Mass.) Huntington School for Boys (Boston, Mass.)
Subjects: Northeastern University (Boston, Mass.) Universities and colleges
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : Northeastern University
Contributing Library: Northeastern University, Snell Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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Porter, M.Ed. William F. Brady, Jr., B.S. Coordinator of Graduate Coop- Educational Placement erative Education Officer Kenneth E. Schongold, B.S. Francis L. Heuston, M.Ed. Graduate and ProfessionalSchool Counselor Thomas J. McEneaney, M.Ed. Counseling and placement services are available to seniors andalumni of all of the programs offered by Northeastern University.Through this department, representatives of hundreds of compa-nies are scheduled to visit the campus each year for the specificpurpose of interviewing seniors for employment after graduation.Lists of job opportunities are maintained for seniors and alumniseeking openings for which they may be qualified. The Department of Graduate Placement Services is also respon-sible for the referral of graduate students enrolled in programsoperated on the Cooperative Plan to assignments designed tosupplement classroom work. It also supplies counseling informa-tion to students who wish to continue their education at the gradu-ate level.

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The Center forCooperative Education DirectorFACULTY Paul E. Dube, M.A., M.Ed. Project Coordinator Stephanie D. Urban, B.A. Overseas Placement Director Donald R. Allen, Ph.D. 224 / Cooperative Education Assistant Director andDirector of Training Rhona E. Wolfe, M.Ed. Training Assistant Barbara J. Reid, B.A. Educational institutions and other organizations exploring, devel-oping, expanding, or improving programs in cooperative educa-tion contact the Center for a variety of services. All facets of theestablishment, operation, and expansion of programs may be ex-plored with professional consultants familiar with all aspects ofcooperative education. Intensive short-term training workshops for both new and ex-perienced coordinators of cooperative programs and the four-week Summer Institute in Cooperative Education offering eightquarter hours of credit are among the services offered by theCenter. The CooperativeEducation ResearchCenter FACULTY Director James W. Wilson, Ph.D., Professor of Co

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Image from page 158 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
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Identifier: bellvol24telephonemag00amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: BayNet

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is fine record have every faith and confidence that, will be maintained. Whos Who & Whats Whatin This Issue The willing, courteous, and effective as-sistance of many members of the Army andNavy, of all ranks, is evident in the sec-tion of this issue dealing with ElectricalCommunications in IVorld-ivide Warfare.Without their aid and counsel the neces-sary information could not have been com-piled nor the photographs obtained. Andsince it is not practicable to make acknowl-edgment here to so many individuals, theeditors express in this fashion their sincere thanks and appreciation to all those in theServices whose help has made possible sounusual a feature in these pages. Neither is it feasible to give credits in-dividually for so many photographs. Theywere secured—with a few exceptions—from the Armys Bureau of Public Rela-tions, the Signal Corps, the Army AirForces, the Navy, the Marine Corps, andthe Coast Guard. They give abundant evi-dence of the splendid work of the Services

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James J. Pilliou Harold L. Ryan George H. Jess 132 Bell Telephone Magazine photographic sections in making a pictorialrecord of every aspect of this war. It is a startling picture of long distanceservice in the not too remote future whichJames J. Pilliod and Harold L. Ryanpaint. As assistant chief engineer, and as-sistant vice president in charge of the traf-fic division, respectively, of the A, T. & T.Companys Department of Operation andEngineering, they are in key positions todiscuss the equipment and methods whichwill make operator toll dialing possible ona nation-wide basis, and the improvementsin service which will come with it. Starting with the Long Lines Depart-ment in 1908, Mr. Pilliod had become by1914 its division plant engineer in Chi-cago. In New York since 1918, he hadbeen successively the Departments engineerof transmission, engineer, and general man-age before transferring to his present post in 1943. Mr. Ryans Bell System career,entirely devoted to work in traffic

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Image from page 160 of “Washington (District of Columbia), city directory” (1921)
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Identifier: washingtondistri00unse
Title: Washington (District of Columbia), city directory
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Polk
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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s, Suits Overcoats and Coats MERCANTILE AGENCIES JOS. P. CUIiliEN L.EO B. ABERNETHV MARTIN J. McNAMARA Pre*—Gen I. Mgr. V. Pres.-Asst. Mgr. Counsel Established 11)11 ^^^^^^ Incorporated 1918 EFFICIENT CULLED crl> SERVICE PROMPT 1416 F STREET N. W. ^ KELLOGG BUILDING CONFIDENTIAL AGENTS A Service on Credit Reports, Colled ions and Investigating Employees Unequaled. Phone Main 7043—youll be convinced. Reference—Any Bank, Newspaper and First-Class Merchant or Professional Man. METAL CEILINGS Estimates Cheerfully Given Erecting by Experts THOS. E. ALLISON Metal Ceiling and Metal Sidewall Contractor All Work Positively Guaranteed19 Years Experience 640 and 642 Penna. Avenue S. E. Phone Lincoln 2649 (1921) BOYDS DIRECTORY OF TH 180 MIMEOGRAPHING PHONE FRANKLIN 1888 Commercial Office Service A PROVEN SERVICE ENTIRE FIRST FLOOR, BALTIC BUILDING606 F STREET MIMEOGRAPHING MULTIGRAPHING TYPEWRITING ADDRESSOGRAPHING STENOGRAPHING PRINTING FOLDING MAILING MONUMENTS TELEPHONE FRANKLIN 6949

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ESTABLISHED 1885 Monuments THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF FINISHED MONUMENTS ONDISPLAY FROM WHICH TO SELECT. YOUR INSPECTION IS INVITED. BUYING MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS FROM PHOTO-GRAPHS OR DESIGNS OFTEN RESULT IN DISAPPOINTMENT. MAKEYOUR SELECTION NOW OF A FINISHED MONUMENT FOR IMMEDI-ATE OR FUTURE DELIVERY. PHILIP SMITH OFFICE, WORKS, DISPLAY YARD: FIRST AND B STREETS S. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. m MfnuiFuni«.,m WM m ■fl m t mm > mm | DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (1921)

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