Image from page 333 of “The story of American heroism; thrilling narratives of personal adventures during the great Civil war, as told by the medal winners and roll of honor men” (1897)

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Image from page 333 of “The story of American heroism; thrilling narratives of personal adventures during the great Civil war, as told by the medal winners and roll of honor men” (1897)
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Identifier: storyofamericanh00wall
Title: The story of American heroism; thrilling narratives of personal adventures during the great Civil war, as told by the medal winners and roll of honor men
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Wallace, Lew, 1827-1905
Subjects: United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865 Personal narratives
Publisher: Springfield, O., J.W. Jones
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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gainst a treeon the side of a craggymountain in the hills of Penn-sylvania, nearly two thousandmiles from home, with deathstanding before me. Thereader can better imaginethan I can tell the feelings1 had. While in that conditiona straggling Federal soldierwalked up to me, looked at the stars on my collar, took ott my hat and putit on his own head, and said, Give me your arms. No, sir, I replied, I cant do that. He stepped back, raised his gun,and repeated, Give me your arms. I said, Why, my good fellow, are you a Federal soldier and dont kncnvthat you have not the right to disarm an officer? The honest soldier looked confused and said, What shall 1 do then witliyou? I told him that he ought to take me to an officer as nearly of my rankas might be. But, said he, you are not able to walk. I then told himhe ought to go and find some officer, and bring him to me. He went away, and in a little time returned to me with a gentlemanwho introduced himself as Colonel Rice of the 44th New York.*

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Passing the Canteen. ♦The writer jirobablj iilhuics to Colonel Etimund Ripe, lieutennnt-polonel of the Ilith Miissnchusetts Volunteers,who led his own regiment and the c»ne mentioned, the 44th New York, in tin- eluir^e nuule to close the Rap in theFederal lines, and repel Picketts assault. Colonel Kice won on that day a medal of honor, and fui-ther mention ofhim will be found in the following chapter. AMERICAN HEROISM. 317 After a few kind remarks, and expi-essing the hope that my hurt was notmortal. Colonel Rice said: Colonel, it becomes my duty to ask you for yourarms. I said, Certainly, sir. and handed him my sword and pistol,remarking to him that I had got but a short loan of that sword when the 14thAlabama captured it a few days previously from the lieutenant-colonel of the22nd ]\Iaine. and had given it to me two days before. Colonel Rice then directed the soldier who had brought him to me to goto the line and bring a litter, and meantime entertained me with kindconversation.

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Image from page 769 of “The new annual army list, militia list, and Indian civil service list” (1870)
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Identifier: newannualarmylis1875hart
Title: The new annual army list, militia list, and Indian civil service list
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Authors: Hart, H. G
Subjects: Great Britain. Army
Publisher: London : John Murray
Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland
Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland

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The Broadway, Ludgate. All communications respecting Advertisements must be forwardedto the contractor, Mr. GEO. PHILLIPS, Telegraph Chambers,Regent Circus, (326,) Oxford Street. MR. R. WILLSON,ARMY AND FINANCE AGENT, 33, St. Jamess Square, Pall Mall, London, S.W.Still acts as Private Agent to Officers at Home and A broad. Private Accounts kept. Widows Pensions, Retired, Full, and Half-Payreceived, and Remittances made with Correctness and Punctuality. Exchanges arranged, and Memorials, Petitions, &c, drafted. Passages, Outfits, Uniforms, Accoutrements, &c, procured, and Messes sup-plied with every Requisite. Money. — Mr. WlLLSON having taken up the subject of Finance, has special facili-ties for obtaining Cash on Personal and other Security, as well as on Mortgages,Reversions, Legacies, &c. Loans, in connexion with Life Assurances, at Five perCent. The Pecuniary Affairs of Officers and Private Gentlemen taken in hand, andIt](ir. tLt! confidentially arranged. C A RSO NS

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ORIGINAL Anti-Corrosion Paint, PATRONISED BY 3§cr ittajcsts the (Queen, anb 3g.^.3§. the ?tinxt of S&alcs. ^4«<a? 8000 a«<f upwards of the Nobility and Gentry. FOR EVERY DESCRIPTION OF OUT-DOOR WORK. IT IS ESPECIALLY APPLICABLE TO WOOD, IRON, BRICK, STONE, AND COMPO. CAN BE LAID ON BY UNSKILLED LABOUR.Two Cwt. Carriage Free to any Station in Great Britain or Ireland.Detailed Particulars, with Prices, Testimonials, and Pattern Cards, PostFree on application. PEEPAKED OIL-MIXTUEE FOE THE ANTI-COEEOSIOH. OILS, TURPENTINE, & BRUSHES. VARNISHES, both for outside and inside purposes. The Original Anti-Corrosion Paint is only to be obtained of WALTER CARSON & SONS, La Belle Sauuage Yard, Ludgate Hill, London, E.G., And 21, Batchelors Walk, Dublin. CA UTION. — All Casks bear the Trade Mark, or are not Genuine. Jn

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Image from web page 155 of “the truly amazing western: a vast kingdom. An extensive history of the trans-Mississippi states and regions. Containing step-by-step statistics alongside information in support of the action for deep harbors regarding Texas-Gulf coast /by F.

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Image from page 155 of “the fantastic western: a massive empire. An extensive history of the trans-Mississippi says and regions. Containing detailed data along with other information to get the activity for deep harbors from the Texas-Gulf coastline /by F.
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Identifier: greatwestvastemp01dana
Title: The great western: a huge empire. A comprehensive reputation for the trans-Mississippi says and territories. Containing detail by detail data alongside information meant for the action for deep harbors on Texas-Gulf coast /by F.L. Dana
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Writers: Dana, F. L
Subjects: United States, western — information and vacation Utah Description and travel Utah Record
Publisher: Denver, Colo: Great West Publishing Co, Excelsior Printing Co.
Contributing Library: Church Record Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Digitizing Sponsor: Corporation of the Presiding Bishop, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

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l be invested in Colorado. Every public enterprise that’s been done in Denver since1871, has received Colonel Spragues assistance. He had been one of theoriginal people in the Denver Chamber of Commerce, and of theReal Estate Exchange, both in businesses he is a valued member.he could be a thorough operator in real estate and is the owner of valuable propertyin Denver and for the condition. He’s got made a specialty of loan-ing cash, having control of large amounts of money of Denver and non-resident capitalists, besides their own big lot of money. Colonel Sprague had been active in getting for Denver its very first roll-ing mill, and was for some time president of that issue. He had been adelegate from the Real Estate Exchange towards the initial deep harbor con-vention, held at Fort Worth, Tx, in. July 1888, and subsequentlyto the Inter-State Deep Harbor Convention, held in Denver, Augustfollowing. Throughout enterprises impacting the passions of Colorado, wefind Col. Sprague an earnest worker and important recommend.

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IRA R. HOLMES,President Inter-State Town and Land Company, Denver, ColoradcSee Sketch on next page. I, R. HOLMES. THE portrait on the other side of the leaf is a life like engraving ofI. It. Holmes, President for the Inter-state Land and Town Com-pany. JIr. Holmes the most active and enterprising males inthe country, being among those indomitable spirits this one rinds onlyin the western. The business which he is the top is an incorpora-tion with a capital of ,000,000, the officers and leading stockholdersbeing, like Mr. Holmes, guys of push and power. The company tend to be large holders of real-estate in lots of associated with the west-ern says and territories, but currently they have been offering almost all of theirattention for their residential property in Ogden, Utah, which, after searching overthe entire industry, they have determined will be the fantastic town regarding the western. Obtained been successful in enabling suprisingly low rates to Ogden and return,and are running excursions there about every thirty days. Their particular initialtrip ended up being made o

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Image from web page 6 of “Ogden City Director” (1895)
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Identifier: ogdencitydirecto01unse
Title: Ogden City Director
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Writers:
Topics: Utah–Directories Utah–Weber–Directories Utah–Weber–Ogden–Directories
Publisher: Ogden, Utah Kansas City, Mo. Leo Haefeli and Frank J. Cannon R.L. Polk and Co.
Contributing Library: Church History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Digitizing Sponsor: Corporation of the Presiding Bishop, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

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Editor and Proprietor. A Semi-Weekly Peoples Celebration Report. The Ogden rtrTWN- 13 a» »we /**?percent T Advertise into the Evaluation should you want to cultivate the patronage ^ iWCVlCvV. of this professional. We are able to would you just as much great, rates UTAH. *-^^_ considered, as any report in Utah. The state Organ of thePopulist Party of Utah. Evaluation Publishing Company, Proprietors, 411 Twenty-Fourth Street. The only real Day Paper in Ogden. TL ¥^:i-T A r1«r^«*4ir> ^«< independent in Politics. Jltf 1)^ A^VCrtlSCr. The best marketing medium in Utah. __ Matt. E. Edsall, Publisher and Mgr. All of the finest commercial Art Printing is completed only at that office. 411 Twenty-Fourth. St. SILVER KING RESTAURANT. J. H. TRUSTY, PROP. DISHES SUPPORTED AT ALL HOURS. FINEST INTO THE CITY.FISH AND GAME IN SEASON. One Block From Union Depot, consume AS YOU WAIT. LOUIS J. BUCHER, Gontractor § Brick Manufacturer DEALER IX Mantels, Grates and Tiling, FIRE BRICK, FIRE CLAY AND PORTLANDCEMENT. Salesroom 2430 Qraiit .Ave. OGDEN, UTAH.

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ernest e. Stevens & organization, Fire, Lifeand Accident Insurance. WASHINGTON AVENUE. REAL ESTATE AND DEBTS. Law Reporter,Notary Public andTeacher of Shorthand and Typewriting;. GEO. GATRELL, STENOGRAPHER. oj([ General Copying. Workplace 41* Utah Loan and Trust Company Building, OGDEN TRANSFER BUSINESS. We move Pianos, Organs, Safes, Office Fixtures, home- p FORD management hold items. In addition store exact same. e» . … rN^i^. r>/kAl Give Full-weight so we Deliver COAL. Bottom Rates. FeSS^iST**- 373 Twenty-Fourth Street. THE BON-TON RESTAURANT HELPS OPEN THROUGH THE NIGHT. Additional Dinner on Sunday from 12 to 8 p. m., Including Wine, 25 cents.We Offer a Lunch from 12 until 4 oclock for 25 cents. Furnished Booms. Brief instructions after all Hours.Fresh Oysters and all forms of Eastern Fish in Season. TON & JIM, Supervisors. 252 Twenty-fifth St., Ogden, Utah. Roentgen L. POLK & COS OGDEN CITY DIRECTORS / 1895-6. EMBRACING A COMPLETE ALPHABETICAL RANGE OF BUSINESS FIRMS AND PRIVATECITIZENS; A CLASSIFIED LIST OF each TRA

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Image from page 10 of “Polk’s Indianapolis (Marion County, Ind.) city directory site, 1883” (1883)
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Identifier: polksindianapoli1883unse
Title: Polk’s Indianapolis (Marion County, Ind.) town directory, 1883
12 Months: 1883 (1880s)
Authors:
Topics: Indianapolis, Ind. Business businesses Residential streets Official residences People Government facilities Churches Schools Streets Cities
Publisher: R.L. Polk
Adding Library: Indianapolis City Directory Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS People and Sloan Foundation

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lCemeteries for this and adjoining States. I actually do not only profess, butpractice creativity in design. PLEASE GIVE ME A CALL, FACE-TO-FACE otherwise BY MAIL. Yours Respectfully, W. C. WHITEHEAD, 161 Massachusetts Ave. J. E. Shover. W. F. Christian. SHOYER & CHRISTIAN, CONTRACTORS The BUILDERS Architects and Superintendents. HOUSE, SIGN AND DECORATIVE PAINTERS. MIRRORS, FRENCH PLATE, PIECE, CUT, EM-BOSSED AND CATHEDRAL GLASS. HAMMERED and RIBBED GLASS fop SKYLIGHTS. 124 East Vermont Street, Phone. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. u< 1867. 1883, C.E. COFFIN & CO., REALESTATE HOME MORTGAGES, ^fcFIRE INSURANCE,*^ * No. 90 East Market St., Have constantly on hand, obtainable or trade, a sizable set of HOUSES AND LOTS, BUILDING PLENTY, FARMS AMD LANDS. ITMORTGAGE EOANS NEGOTIATED AND FIRE INSURANCE WRITTEN ON EOWEST COSTS. Particular interest provided to the collection of rents, pay-ment of taxes and care of city property and farms. Reference the banking institutions and company males usually of Indianapolis* MONUMENTS!

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Importer of Scotch Granite, -MANUFACTURER OF — ITALIAN and AMERICAN MARBLE MONUMENTS, TABLETS, etcetera. New Resigns Continuously Executed by the Many Ex-perienced Designers. No. 70 East Market Street, Opposite Postoffice. X1TI5IAXTAFOI.IS, ZND, 10 MINNESOTA CHIEF SEPARATOR.

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Image from page 44 of “Africa and its own residents” (1899)

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Image from page 44 of “Africa and its inhabitants” (1899)
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Identifier: africaitsinhabit02recl
Title: Africa and its inhabitants
12 Months: 1899 (1890s)
Writers: Reclus, Elisée, 1830-1905 Keane, A. H. (Augustus Henry), 1833-1912
Subjects: Ethnology
Publisher: London : J.S. Virtue
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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centuries created by the emigrants and people engagedin the whale fisheries. Thousands have previously checked out Portugal, Brazil, theWest Indies, the Sandwich isles, in addition to Arctic Seas, with no various other insularpopulation most likely includes therefore big a proportion of men that have made the I>:nABITANTS OF THIS AZOEES. 31 trip of the world. Amongst the rural courses wedding is almost constantly an affairof pure convenience and interest. Various traces however survive associated with the formerseclusion of the ladies, noticeable in building for the houses and especiallvin the outfit. Enveloped in their large hooded cloaks, the Azorian ladies seemto flit about like phantoms. Several hoods are still so contrived concerning meetin front side, making just a narrow orifice when it comes to wearer ^nth which to see withoutbeing seen. Within the district of San Miguel the partner, whenever spending a call or goingto size, may not go by the part of the woman husband, just who struts majestically a few Fijj. 12.—WoiiEx OP Deadly axd Sax-Miguzl. S-W-jJ.JV .J

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paces in front. Formerly the ladies in the towns cannot even go overseas tomake their expenditures, but had to do-all their particular shopping home, never leaving thefemale flats except to consult with the church. At approach of a man it waseven etiquette to show to the wall surface to prevent a profane glance. The people increases quickly by all-natural more than births throughout the mortality,families being extremely nimierous, plus the death-rate amongst young ones relativelyextremely low. In addition the survival also of weaker offspring tendsapparently to result in a general degradation associated with the race, and men are no 32 ^EST AFRICA. I longer noticed in the archipelago at all comparable to the durable peasantry of NorthPortugal. Epidemics sporadically break out, as well as the old chroniclers speak of pestilence, which in combo aided by the Moorish corsairs laid waste the risingsettlements. At the moment gastric and tj-phoid fevers are endemic, although theirnridencc is much diminished by the topogr

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Image from web page 206 of “United states ornithology when it comes to home and college” (1901)
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Identifier: americanornithol11901reed
Title: United States ornithology the house and school
12 Months: 1901 (1900s)
Writers: Reed, Chester A. (Chester Albert), 1876-1912
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: Worcester, Mass. : C.K. Reed
Adding Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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■a-u-ii-u-a-<»-a-u-cA-i*-u-{*-a-< ci=»ncH<Ci»ciHHcincnnn=j3B=- Vol. I. September, IDOl. JVo, 9 UNITED STATES OSTRICH FARMS. one thousand Os- Nearly triches, the descendents ofAfrican imports, are vege-tating in CaHfornia and Ar-izona only at that writing. Apair of the animals havebeen known in Californiato hatch thirty-seven chicksin 12 months; a brief reflec-tion upon these numbers with-out a vibrant imagination willin a rather limited time showlarge potential profits inthe culture regarding the AmericanOstrich; experience, thebest instructor, shows thatthis price cannot by anymeans be depended upon,but that various localitieseven in the same districtaffect very seriously thehealth of this strange spec-imen of bird creation.Cold winds and wantof green meals are often fatalto the Ostrich youthful; eventhe embryo is not free of

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the CORRESPONDENT. i6o UNITED STATES ORNITHOLOGY. threat of destruction by the moms and dad, either caused by fright on component ofthe hen Ostrich, causing breaking the eggs within the nest, or bythe irregular desire for food of the male, that will in many cases get a habitof consuming the fresh laid eggs of their companion. The Ostrich business has al-ready gained proportions of adequate dimensions to interest money; and todaynot just one Ostrich are available for love or cash uncontrolled by thecompetitive demand with this Ostrich trust. For purposes of income mostof the Ostrich facilities of America are influenced by the item of interestwhich these odd bipeds tend to be on tourists from north; whom annual-ly visitthe warmer climates with this nation, in which just can the AfricanOstrich thrive. Events are constructed of the birds at Northern expositions,but these exhibits tend to be in no way Ostrich facilities inside true feeling of that

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Image from page 100 of “Poly, The” (1916)

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Image from page 100 of “Poly, The” (1916)
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Identifier: polythe1916bill
Title: Poly, The
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Billings Polytechnic Institute
Subjects: RMC yearbooks yearbooks Rocky Mountain College History Billings Polytechnic History
Publisher: Billings Polytechnic Institute
Contributing Library: Rocky Mountain College, Paul M. Adams Memorial Library, Heritage Archives
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Glenn Harvey Smith. He left his as-sociations here for that other life when such a bright future seemed justahead, yet we know that some day the mystery will be solved. Till thenwe will revere his memory and respect the fine things he stood for. Empress Brand STEEL CUT COFFEE For Sale by all First ClassGrocers Everywhere Roasted and Packed by Stone-Ordean-Wells Co. Mortgage Loans on Im-proved Real Estate Montana MortgageCompany Selvidge- Babcocfy BuildingPhone 1317 —98— Perkins-Savage Lumber Co. BILLINGS, MONTANA DEALERS IN LUMBER ANDBUILDING MATERIAL We offer to the public the highest grade material atthe lowest possible price consistent with good business. Our Motto Is: Good Goods at Right Prices WE SATISFY PHONE 1051 We have for sale the best Upland in Montana to If you are looking for a loca-tion for a suburban home, wehave the best. W. B. GEORGELAND CO. Push The Button and follow instructions: You willget as good results as the professionalphotographer, with The Ansco

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There isno guess-work. Theprice is low.The Anscolasts foryears. WE DOYOUR DEVELOPING, Quickly, Accur-ately and at a Moderate Price. LEE WARREN, 2703 Montana Ave.RED CROSS DRUG STORE At 106 Broadway -99- You Can Get It atChappies DRUGS Sationery, Kodaksand Supplies Kodak Finishing andSupplies Chappie Drug Co. BILLINGS, MONT. A mencan Bank & TrustCompany CAPITAL, 0,000.00 AdiveAlert Alive W. LEE MAINS. PresidentCHAS. SPEAR, Vice PresidentO. W. ALLEN, CashierJOS. L. McCLELLAN, Asst. Cash. For The BEST in Real Estate,Loans and Abstracting ofTitles—see YellowstoneInvestment Co. J. L. ALFORD, Mgr.7 Broadway Hail! Hail! The Gang Comes Here! MetropolitanBarber Shop 7 CHAIRS 7 * There Is a Reason * ROTHROCK & KOLB McNutts Grocery Good Things to Eatfor Quality Your Satisfaction means our SuccessBoth Phones R. J. McNUTT, Jr., PROPRIETOR —100- Hart-AlbinCo. Montanas Greatest Dry Goods Store Founded 1902 AT Your Service When in the market for HARDWAREFURNACESPAINTSSTOVESRANGESROOFIN

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Image from page 372 of “Hawaii and its people; the land of rainbow and palm” (1899)
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Identifier: hawaiiitspeoplel00twom
Title: Hawaii and its people; the land of rainbow and palm
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Twombly, Alexander S. (Alexander Stevenson), 1832-1907
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Boston [etc.] Silver, Burdett
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University Hawaii, Joseph F. Smith Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Consortium of Church Libraries and Archives

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se Min-ister at Washington also formally protested against thetreaty. The same month, June, 1897, Hon. Harold M.Sewall arrived at Honolulu as United States Minister,to succeed Minister Willis, who had died in office.During the month of January, 1898, President Dolewas in Washington in the interests of annexation, andMr. J. O. Carter, the ex-queens friend and adviser, alsowent to the capital to oppose the treaty. The ex-queenhad already heavily mortgaged her private estate, toresist, by all means in her power, the resistless sweepof manifest destiny, soon to become apparent in thestartling events of this memorable year. Quite different was the conduct of the Princess Kaiu-lani, the ex-heir apparent to the throne of Hawaii, whohad returned to Honolulu in October of the year 1897.Her birthday reception, a week later, was attended notonly by the leading natives, but also by society in gen-eral, including even those who had been parties to the ANNEXATION OF HAWAII TO THE UNITED STATES. 369

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PRINCESS KAIULANl 370 ANNEXATION OF HAWAII TO THE UNITED STATES. destruction of her royal prospects. She received themall courteously, and from that time became one of theleading young ladies in social and philanthropic circles.By her charming manners and lovely disposition shewon golden opinions of all. She was always a favoritein the islands. After the republic of Hawaii was estab-lished, she never again lent her name to any discussionof the politics of her country. But alas! to the great sorrow of all who knew her,she died in Honolulu March 6, 1899, and received thehonors due to her rank and virtues in one of the mostimposing funeral pageants ever seen in Hawaii. Twohundred and fifty natives drew the funeral car to theMausoleum where Hawaiian kings and queens repose inpeace. It has already been stated that the war of 1898 betweenthe United States and Spain hastened the annexation ofHawaii to our republic. The relations of the United States with Spain, in re-gard to Cuba, had been f

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Image from page 142 of “Hill’s album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches of many persons who have been and are prominent as religionists, military heroes, inventors, financiers, scientists, explorers, writers, physicians, actors,

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Image from page 142 of “Hill’s album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches of many persons who have been and are prominent as religionists, military heroes, inventors, financiers, scientists, explorers, writers, physicians, actors,
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Identifier: hillsalbumofbiog00hill
Title: Hill’s album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches of many persons who have been and are prominent as religionists, military heroes, inventors, financiers, scientists, explorers, writers, physicians, actors, lawyers, musicians, artists, poets, sovereigns, humorists, orators and statesmen, together with chapters relating to history, science, and important work in which prominent people have been engaged at various periods of time
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Hill, Thomas E. (Thomas Edie), 1832-1915
Subjects: Biography Encyclopedias and dictionaries
Publisher: Chicago : Hill Standard Book Co.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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was born at Groton.Mass., 1792, and was for many years asso-ciated in business with his brother Amos.In the latter part of his life Abbott wasengaged largely in the China trade. In1834 he was elected to Congress, wherehe served on the committee on ways anilnu-jins; subsequently he was one of the Government Northwesternboundary commission. In 1849 President Taylor offered him a seatin his cabinet; but Mr. Lawrence declined and accepted the postof Minister to Great Britain. Was recalled, however, at his ownrequest, in 18.53. The remainder of his life he devoted to privatebusiness, his fortune becoming very large. To Harvard College hegave ,000 to establish a scientific school, which bears his name,and left ,000 more to establish model lodging-houses. Hidiedat Boston, in 1H55. In the careers of both these gentlemen was manifested the trueNew England character f(tr business energy and integrity, producingtill- ii>iuil r>iilt—livr- iif jirii-perity juid di»Jtinrii.in BARNUM.

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The Experience and Testimony of Successful Men. A B C of Success. ATTEND carefully to details of your business.Be prompt in all things.Consider well, —then decide.Dare to do right. Fear to do wrong.Endure trials patiently.Fight lifes battle bravely, manfully.(Jo not in the society of the vicious.Hold integrity sacred. Injure not anothers reputation or business.Join hands only with the virtuous.Keep your mind from evil thoughts.Lie not for any consideration.Make few acquaintances.Never trj to appear what you are not.Oppose not in spit* or malice.Pay your debts promptly.Question not the veracity of a friend.Respect the counsel of your parents.Sacrifice money rather than principle.Touch not, taste not, handle not intoxicatingdrinks.Use your leisure time for improvement.Venture not upon the threshold of wrong.AVatch carefully over your passions.Xtend to every one a kindly salutation.Yield not to discouragements.Zealously labor for the right.& success is certain. You Will Not be Sorr

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Image from page 491 of “Heads of the people, or, Portraits of the English” (1864)
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Identifier: headsofpeopleorp02mead
Title: Heads of the people, or, Portraits of the English
Year: 1864 (1860s)
Authors: Meadows, Joseph Kenny, 1790-1874
Subjects:
Publisher: London : Henry G. Bohn
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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bours, but that all under-sheriffs,and all officers of and belonging to a Sheriff, are so remarkable forsuperhuman activic^ and alertness. But now his responsibilitiesare increased to an unprecedented degree of difficulty and danger.To stand actions for false arrest, or to be fixed with debt and costs bya rascally ruler who passes the boundary line and forgets to return,was bad enough ; but to have the law of arrest, in its most per-emptory form, turned against himself is worse than bad, and not tobe atoned for by the pleasure of labouring night and day for thepublic; and the distinction of parading a superb, but costly equipage,with the privilege of dining half London and Middlesex ** regardlessof expense. THE CITY PLEADER. The City Pleader is well-skilled in the law and gastronomy of hiscountry. His opinions are sound, his appetite excellent, and hisdigestion easy. He would elsewhere be called the standing counsel;but a protracted stay at table iu the civic regions, renders it expe-

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THE CITY PLEADER. Nor e er looks forward further than hia nose,

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Image from page 920 of “Our western empire, or, The new West beyond the Mississippi : the latest and most comprehensive work on the states and territories west of the Mississippi : containing the fullest and most complete description, from official and ot
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Identifier: ourwesternempire1881broc
Title: Our western empire, or, The new West beyond the Mississippi : the latest and most comprehensive work on the states and territories west of the Mississippi : containing the fullest and most complete description, from official and other authentic sources, of the geography, geology and natural history (with abundant incidents and adventures), the climates, soil, agriculture, the mineral and mining products, the crops, and herds and flocks, the social condition, educational and religious progress, and future prospects of the whole region lying between the Mississippi and Pacific Ocean : to which is added the various routines, and prices of passage and transportation for emigrants thither, the laws, regulations and provisions for obtaining lands from the national or state government of railroads, counsel as to locations and procuring lands, crops most profitable for culture, mining operations, and the lastest processes for the reduction of gold and silver, the exercise of trades or professions, and detailed descriptions of each state ad territory, with full information concerning Manitoba, British Columbia, and those regions in the Atlantic States adapted to settlement, by those who do not wish to go west, and statistics of crops, areas, rainfall, etc.
Year: 1881 (1880s)
Authors: Brockett, L. P. (Linus Pierpont), 1820-1893
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : Bradley, Garretson & Co. Columbus, O. : W. Garretson & Co.
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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e fish of Kansas are several species of perch,sunfish, catfish, roach, black bass, one or two species of trout, etc.Shad, salmon, salmon trout, grayling, an eastern species of blackbass, etc., have been introduced through the Fish Commission,but the success of these introductions is not yet fully demon-strated. The reptiles are much the same as those of Arkansasand Missouri. Nahiral Curiosities and Phenomena.—In a prairie State likeKansas there are comparatively few of these. The most re-markable are the Monument Rocks in Gove county, the PulpitRock in Ellsworth county, the Rock City, and the PerforatedRock near by, in Ottawa county, the Table Rock in Lincolncounty, and the masses of gypsum and selenite in the gypsumbeds. Some of the fossil bones of vertebrates in the tertiary hadbeen so thoroughly slllcified as to be converted Into moss agatesof great beauty. This is particularly the case In Wallace andSheridan counties. The moss agates of that region, not fossils,are very perfect.

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^K^^ RUSSIAN VILLAGE. KANSAS—A DUG-OUT—HAYlNc; CLIMATE OF KANSAS. 86? Clijnate and Meteoj^ology.—No State in the Union, certainlynone in Our Western Empire, has been so thorough in record-ing its climatic changes as Kansas. This has been due largely,indeed almost entirely, to the persistent and untiring efforts ofthe excellent Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture, thelate Hon. Alfred Gray, to whom not only the State but agricul-turists and scientists everywhere owe a debt of gratitude whichcan never be fully repaid. His admirable reports, prepared withso much labor and with such accuracy and completeness amidgreat bodily suffering and wasting disease, attest alike his philan-thropy and his devotion to his work. We may say in generalthat the climate of Kansas is a very desirable one. The summermonths are in most parts of the State rather hot, the averagemean temperature being for June about 75°, for July about 84.5°,and for August about 77.5°. The extremes of the winter

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Identifier: bluewhiteserial13ashe
Title: The blue and white [serial]
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Asheville School (Asheville, N.C.)
Subjects: Asheville School (Asheville, N.C.) Private schools School yearbooks
Publisher: Asheville, N.C. : The Senior Class
Contributing Library: University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

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any Hormiguero Central Corporation Central Patricio Punta Alegre Sugar Company Central San Ramon San Agustin Sugar Company Central Senado Soledad Sugar Company Cuban Canadian Sugar Company Trinidad Sugar Company Florida Sugar Company EUROPEAN REPRESENTATIVE: EDWARD GREY & COMPANY LIVERPOOL BOSTON NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA 10 Broad Street 111 West Street 135 South Second Street » » » » » • * • • • • • • • • ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ «• >- ♦ v y ftft ❖t Y T . T f y * y y I ft ft 4 y y X At your service with closed or open cars at all hours $ y I y y y y y 4 I ft Y J I ft y $ y y ft y ft $ I J. L. RARDEN I y ? y y ? Wo/ « Minute Late Auto Service % ft y y y y t y t y t y t y y y y y y Y Y T Y ft t Y Y y y y t y t Y Have Your Parents Use Our Cars •§ ft , Y When in Town Y Y | y ?I YYYYYfY?Y ftI £ Asheville, N. C X*t yyyyy Telephone 431 2 N. Market St. X Y y ftY yyvyyy Yft ROBERT E. McKEE General ContractorConstruction Engineer 1900-1932 Texas St.El PasoTexas

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+—. . + Compliments ofthe GLASS OF 1925 +-———• i Exclusive Ready-to-Wear for Men, Womenand Children Mens and Young Mens Lounging and Dress Clothes,Furnishings and Haberdashery of the Better Kind. Golf and Hunting Togs, Hiking and Camping Clothes,Sweaters, Shoes, etc. Fishin tackle thats fit for fishin. Complete lines ofBaseball, Football, and Tennis Goods. 11 Patton Avenue Asheville, N. C. George W. Langford Company General Contractors MAIN OFFICE AT Louisville, Kentucky In the financing and erecting of office buildings,hotels and other sound building propositions _ourfinancial connections make it possible to be ofconsiderable service to owners by taking bonds inpayment of a large part of the contract price. Ourconstruction organization is unexcelled CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED Compliments ofGEO. B. MATTHEWS & SONSNew Orleans, La. LACKNER, BUTZ & Company Mortgage Investments Bank Floor, Conway Building111 W. Washington St.Chicago Illinois Municipal Bonds ARE TOTALLY FRE

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Image from page 374 of “City documents. Municipal register, mayor’s address, annual reports, etc” (1894)
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Identifier: citydocumentsmun1918newb
Title: City documents. Municipal register, mayor’s address, annual reports, etc
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: New Bedford (Mass.)
Subjects: New Bedford (Mass.) — Politics and government
Publisher: New Bedford, The City, Printed by the Baker Mfg. Co
Contributing Library: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Digitizing Sponsor: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

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pig PARK DEPARTMENT FINANCIAL REPORT New Bedford, Mass. December 1, 1918. To the Board of Park Commissioners : The Twenty-fifth Annual Financial Report ofthe receipts and expenditures of the department ofparks, for the year ending November 30, 1918, whichI have the honor to submit contains in detail, inform-ation regarding the finances of the department in-cluding the receipts, expenses, and disbursements ofthe Park Commission, and affords in this summary,which is given herewith, an opportunity for thosewho are interested in parks, and their managementand maintenance, a correct explanation of all moneysprovided by the taxpayers for the past year, and thesame is hereby submitted to our citizens for their con-sideration.

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P20 PARK DEPARTMENT Financial Statement for the Year Buttonwood Park ,902.42 Hazelwood Park 2,792.13 Brooklawn Park 7,785.13 Triangle Park 50.00 Common 7,847.37 Office 4,857.18 Ashley Park 1G0.80 Bridge Approach 1,112.68 Grove Park 2,482.82 Balance on hand 9.47 Transferred to unappropriated Funds (see City Auditors Balance 718.80 ,718.80 Receipts Appropriation ,000.00 Sale of milk 112.59 Rent, (cafe privileges) 150.00 Sale of Vegetables 376.21 Sale of wood 80.00 ;718.80 Office Expenses and MiscellaneousExpenditures Superintendent and Clerk ,369.73 Telephone 124.17 Supplies 119.44 Auto Rent, repairs, gasoline, etc 553.08 Printing 60.45 Annual Report 124.00 Traveling Expenses 345.51 Painting Office 55.07 Miscellaneous 105.73 ,847.18

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Image from page 115 of “Agriculture; a text for the school and the farm” (1921)

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Identifier: agriculturetextf00bens
Title: Agriculture; a text for the school and the farm
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Benson, Oscar Herman, 1875-1951. [from old catalog] Betts, George Herbert, 1868-1934, [from old catalog] joint author
Subjects: Agriculture
Publisher: Indianapolis, The Bobbs-Merrill company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ecipes. 4. In the field demonstrate the proper method of seed-ing and, when equipment is available, the methods of pre-paring seed bed, disking, fertilizing, etc. 5. Demonstrate how to select individual wheat and oatheads for seed. 6. Wheat and Oat Play Contests Plan and carry out the following contest games: 1. Variety naming contest. 2. Wheat and oat judging contest. 3. Recipe giving contest. 4. Bread baking contest. 5. Oral descriptions by class members of a thrashingday at home. 7. Wheat or Oat Club Project A wheat or oat club makes an interesting method ofstudying the economic production of these cereals. Themembers of the club should arrange to grow from one tofive acres, studying carefully the system of follow-upinstruction provided by the managers of such clubs in yourcounty and state, and keeping a complete record of all ob-servations, receipts and expenditures. The girls can grow a small plat, say one square rod,with a view to studying the life history of the plant, its cul-

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A club girl witli lier baking of bread. OATS 97 tural methods, and its use for food products. In connectionwith domestic-science work, the girls can prepare for ex-hibit purposes the various dishes possible from the oat andbake a loaf of wheat bread for the school exhibit eachmonth. This makes an interesting demonstration for Fri-day afternoon programs. For a basis of award in prize contests or for credit rat-ings on home projects and the club work, we suggest thatyou secure recommendations of your Supervisor of Agri-cultural and Flome Economic Education in your state, andalso get help from your State Leader of Boys and GirlsExtension Work. In the absence of their aid, the followingwill be helpful: Home and Club Project Score Card 1. Yield and quality of produclion 30 2. Net profit on investment 30 3. Exhibit of grain and materials 20 4. Crop records and story of work 20 Total score, if perfect 100 Suggestions Have members of the class outline a set of ten demon-strations with oats, f

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Image from page 241 of “North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]” (1894)
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Identifier: northcarolinachr6612unit
Title: North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference
Subjects: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference Methodist Church
Publisher: Greensboro, N.C., Methodist Board of Publication, [etc.]
Contributing Library: Duke Divinity School Library, Duke University
Digitizing Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to Duke University for the Religion in North Carolina project.

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ake nutand fruit bonbons—the business will netyou to 0 per month. You canwork from your own home; all who sam-ple your bonbons become regular custom-ers. You start by investing less than for supplies. Mary Elizabeth startedher candy kitchen with .00 and hasmade a fortune. Cannot you do like-wise? I will tell you all about the busi-ness and help you start, so you can be-come independent. Now is the psycho-logical time to make big money, as sugaris cheaper and fine bonbons commandphenomenal prices. Write today. IsabellaInez. 322 Morewood Building, Pittsburgh,Pa. TEN-POINT STANDARD CREDIT SYS-TEM FOR SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASSES Use has proved its value. Develops thescholars. Aids the teachers. The indi-vidual has first place. Effort is stimu-lated. Card for each class member. Dif-ferent from other systems. Splendidsystem. Most complete. 100 cards,.50; 1,000 cards, .50; 12 cards for 25c.Sample cards, 5c. Published exclusivelyby Geo. W. Morse, 12 N. Cooke St., Ports-mouth. Va.

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Strengthen Your Position You who are at the top of theladder may come tumbling down ifyour investments suddenly turnedou . worthless. Prevent any such occurrence byputting your money into safe,sound, interest paying bonds. Alamance First Mortgage 6 percent Gold Bonds are backed bybig surplus, a reliable company andfully secured by first mortgages. You should know more aboutthem. Write, call or phone to nearestoffice for free booklet, entitledBonds. Some of the testimonyit contains may be from one ofyour friends. Investigate Before Investing Alamance Insurance &Real Estate Co. W. E. Sharpe, Mgr.BURLINGTON, N. C. Branches: Raleigh, Durham, Reids-vllle, Fayettevllle, Asheboro. We Offer During The Month ofApril Up to the amount of stock on hand, to any church or congregationin North Carolina, a first quality guaranteed pure Linseed Oil andLead Paint, whos covering capacity is 300 to 350 sq. ft. two coats,according to surface. The Paint sells for .00 per gallon. For themonth of April

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Identifier: buenavistaco0708buen
Title: Buena Vista College bulletin
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Buena Vista College
Subjects: Buena Vista College Buena Vista College Universities and colleges
Publisher: Storm Lake, Iowa : Buena Vista College
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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BANKING OUR course in banking is notonly intended to be of practi-cal assistance to young peopledesiring bank employment, but to beof practical benefit to every youngman and young woman as well as toqualify the student for a generalbusiness career. We do not limitour instruction to the mere handlingof a cash account. It includes thestudy of forms and the use of checks,notes, drafts, collections, discounts,exchanges and the various forms ofbanking, including bonds, loans,letters of credit and negotiable in-struments. Our instruction is de-signed to give the student an intelli-gent and clear understanding of themanagement of a bank account. Weaim to develop the highest businesscapacity in every student, so thatthey will be able to cope with theproblems of any business enterprise.

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OFFICE METHODS THE crowning feature of a courseat this institution is the prac-tical instruction in the use ofoffice appliances, conveniences andmethods, including general officetraining. This part of the work isthe exact duplication of conditions,as obtained in the most improved,up-to-date and progressive businessoffices. The true working spirit ofthis, however, can be best apprecia-ted by the fact that our graduatesare able to adapt themselves to theconditions of any business office assoon as they accept a position. Thispractical course of instruction hasbeen the means of securing for ourgraduates many high grade positionsthat they would not have been ableto secure had it not been for ourpractical method of imparting thisknowledge, including filing letters,card index systems, letter copying,etc. I m POSITIONS WE not only give you a practi-cal business and shorthandeducation, but will do ourutmost to assist you to a profitableposition. Your opportunity for secur-ing employment after

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Image from page 166 of “The Vienna galleries : offering a short history of community and exclusive galleries of Vienna ; with a crucial description associated with the paintings therein included” (1912)

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Identifier: viennagalleriesg00prey
Title: The Vienna galleries : giving a brief overview for the general public and exclusive galleries of Vienna ; with a vital information regarding the paintings therein included
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Writers: Preyer, David C. (David Charles), 1861-1913
Subjects: Painting
Publisher: Boston : St. Botolph Soc.
Adding Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

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ut 1658, holds the traces regarding the economicstruggles by which he’d passed; the other(No. 1268) shows him inside the last years, with thedeep furrow involving the eyes of painful idea.His was in fact an eventful life, by which he saw thesun of popularity sink beneath the clouds of neglect,and the success which his wizard introduced himmelt away through the daunting debts of hiscareless management. And we also cannot forgethow the devotion of his friend Hendrikje Stoffelscomforted him in his declining years, and enabledhim to illuminate his works with the effectiveness of hisgenius through to the end came. Within start of his Amsterdam careerwhen but thirty years old, he painted the magnificent,regal portraits of a person and a woman (Nos. 1271and 1272). Right here we discover still the attention to de-tail which his brush plays caressingly with thearticles of finery, without neglecting that heart fulnessof appearance which he never ever omitted. Just a fewyears later on, in 1639, came that portrait which to

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REMBRANDT Plate xvi Ubc flemish anfc> Dutcb paintings 121 me personally has always been the best portrait of old ageever painted, the Portrait of his mama (No.1273). Neither Plate XVI, nor the manyreproductions, whether from metallic or copper or light-print, is ever going to supply the vividness of this ebbinglife, the air of truth, that chord of humansympathy which one feels tightening, when standingbefore this marvel regarding the painters art. In addition the Apostle Paul, mentioned previously,dates from this time; as the Reading Youth (No. 1269), a portrait recognised by Bode to beof their child Titus, is of a later duration. Fellow-pupil with Rembrandt inside PieterLastman studio was Jan Lievens, just who painted hisfriend Rembrandt as a Youth (No. 1278),around which Jan van den Hoecke painted a wreathof flowers. The maturer talent of Lievens is seenin the Portrait of a classic Man (No. 1277). Among the first students which found Rembrandtsstudio in Amsterdam had been Govaert Flinck, whosework is frequently ascribed to

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Identifier: varsitywarsup1916stud
Title: The Varsity war product 1916
12 Months: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Topics:
Publisher: Students Administrative Council, University of Toronto
Contributing Library: University of Toronto Archives & Records Control Services
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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better than the Anzacs, or perhaps the English, Scotch or Irish, butwe have actually fought and. Our kids have actually quitted themselveslike males and that’s enough. We’re baptized and admittedto the councils worldwide. We now have aided when you look at the greatestemergency society features previously known. We also savedsome of those times as soon as the fate of empire ended up being dangling inthe environment between early morning and evening. For a generation whenmen and women gather together in Canada there will be menwrearing medals regarding the clasps attached with which will beFrench and Belgian names indissolubly linked with thesoldiers of Canada. In this environment will grow up thechildren who have been too-young to make the mans component at thefront and/or womans component at home, but who will be shapedmentally and actually because of the great deeds of these fathersand mothers; and which shall estimate the end result in the genera-tions yet to come? When the war is over you will see to start with an unpleasant periodof readjusting our matters economically, industrially and socially.

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94 THE VARSITY MAG SUPPLEMENT What effect will the duty associated with war financial obligation have actually upon ourincomes and our power to create cheaply? Exactly what suitableoccupation can we discover for our coming back troops as well as for thesoldiers and immigrants off their lands? Just how can wedea1 successfully with this immigration issues, raciallyand industrially? We would like men on land, maybe not in thecities, therefore we must soplan that guys canacquire the land andpay for this as easily aspossible, such a long time asthey are reasonably fit.We desire guys of othernations to understandthat this will be a Britishcountry and that ifthey arrived at Canadatheir young ones mustspeak English. Immi-gration under otherconditions will rapidlybecome intolerable.What will happen tothe lots of women whohave loaded the places of men during war? How do weput to ordinary utilizes the skill in business, manufacturing,invention, craftsmanship, unit and co-ordination oflabour discovered to make munitions of war? Just how can wepreserve the brand new relations amongst the stat

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Image from web page 197 of “Legislative legislation of railway finance in The united kingdomt” (1911)
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Identifier: legislativeregul00wang
Title: Legislative legislation of railroad finance in England
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Wang, Ching-Chun, 1883-
Subjects: Railroads and condition Railroads Theses
Publisher:
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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hemortgagees depended. The balance provided: 3. The task as difined by the organizations Glauses J Consolidation Act, 1845, and all the machines, carriages, wagons andother plant, movable and inmovable (including work-shops), utilized orrequired when it comes to proper administration and dealing associated with the railv;ay, andbelonging into the railway business, will be safety the paymentand whilst the situation might need, when it comes to payment, associated with principalmoney regarding the debenture financial obligation; therefore shall perhaps not hereafter be lawfulfor anybody to seize and take in execution, in satisfaction of anydebt or claim, (besides prices or fees, or lease charges in respectof which there’s an electric of stress, or settlement for personalinjury, or reduction) sustained or made after the passage through of this work,such undertaking, motors, carriages, wagons, or other plant, in-cluding workshops as aforesaid. 1. Hansard, vol. 185, p. 781. 2. The bill had been introduced on Feb. 12, 1867. Hansard, vol. 185,pp. 297-299. 3. Hansard, vol, 185 p. 781.

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As is seen from th< passage, the bill couldn’t assist thedebenture-holder to his principal. It just protected him their in-terest. For, clearly, it absolutely was only the purchase of this range in vh ichhis cash ended up being sunk which could pay the home loan whenever credit ofthe undertaking was so damaged that no brand-new loan provider would come for-ward to replate the old people. But this in fact was not veryobjectionable, since provided that one got his interest on a regular basis,he frequently would not fret much about his key. This was es-pecially real in England at that time, whenever everyone was veryent erpri sing. This measure ended up being regarded as both timely and helcful in setting up the desirability of debentures. Nobody could question, 1 remarked the Economist, this enactment is effective. Itamounts to protecting the attention of mortgages from all danger,if the line yields money enough to pay it, considering that the whole earn-ing machine is kept collectively and undamaged to help make just what gains itcan. It had been additionally thought in Parlia

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