Image from page 104 of “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 104 December 1901 to May 1902” (1902)

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Image from page 104 of “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 104 December 1901 to May 1902” (1902)
bankruptcy
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Identifier: harpersnew0104various
Title: Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 104 December 1901 to May 1902
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: various
Subjects:
Publisher: New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University-Idaho

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onder-ing what theyhad to do onearth. A fewstarved dogs,short of ear andtail, are dozingon the pave-ment, and a manin shoes is no-ticed by hisheavier footfall,the majority pa-cing along withghostly noiseless-ness. It is therattling, shabbyequipage, afterall, that is thespasmodic dis-turber of thisunique dream-world; it breaksin on the peaceof a whole neigh-borhood likestage – thunder,tears along anddisappears like acyclone, markingits track with thewrecks of brokensleep and shat-tered dreams.Presently an ele-gant turnout brings in sight a lady dressed in the latestParisian fashion, at the side of a gentle-man in faultless attire. This is varied bya beggar or two, whose pitiful appearancemore than his appeal moves you to lookfor your coppers. The eye lights on abasket filled with those Azorean orangesof which so much is heard; you pick outa few of the Hesperian apples; the boynames three hundred rets as the price,arid you drop the fruit in astonishment.At the hotel a stunning sensation

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A St. Michafi. Farmfr and his Wifk comes at the sound of the amount to bepaid for the accommodation. For two ina room, three thousand rets a day. Hea-vens! with a letter of credit of a shorttwo thousand, in the pocket, you startto compute how many hours you couldstand it in the Fortunate Islands be-fore landing in bankruptcy. The result isa revelation. Having fathomed the valueof the rei, you stand revealed to yourselfas a multi-millionaire. Two thousanddollars exceed three million re is. 88 HARPEKS MONTHLY MAGAZINE. The general impression made by theAzores is that a piece of the enchanted,slumbering Orient has by a miracle beentransplanted to be disenchanted in thisunclassic quarter of the world. At everyturn the Semitic type faces you in castsof countenances either Moorish or strong-ly Jewish. For once you behold Rome,Jerusalem, and Mecca kneeling in millen-nial harmony before the cross. How thiscame to pass need hardly be told. Spainand Portugal have too long intermingledwith the S

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Image from page 10 of “Hudson & Manhattan tunnels : uniting New York and New Jersey in picture and story.” (1908)
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Identifier: hudsonmanhattant00durs
Title: Hudson & Manhattan tunnels : uniting New York and New Jersey in picture and story.
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Durst, Seymour B., 1913-, former owner. NNC
Subjects: Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corporation Hudson and Manhattan Railroad Company Tunnels
Publisher: New York : American Photograph Co.
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: The Durst Organization

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iver from ^.ortlandt street, New Yorkto Jersey City, thence connecting with the terminals of the Pennsylvania, Erie andDelaware, Lackawanna and Western railroads, from whence there extend under theHudson two other tunnels to Christopher street, New York, thence to and up, Sixthavenue as far as Thirty-third street)—will for years, if not for ages, stand asthe greatest engineering feat undertaken by man. Haskins 1874 Tunnel. The idea of tunneling under the Hudson river had its con-ception in the fertile brain of Colonel D. C. Haskins, an English civil engineer of consid-erable note and ability, in 1874, and he set about organizing a company to finance andbore the tunnel, and after arduous labor, and much persuasion succeeded in interestingabout two millions of dollars of New York capital in his undertaking. He began workin 1878, and had constructed one thousand, two hundred fifty feet of tunnel, when acave-in of the roof sheathing, in 1880, drowned twenty-one men in the air-locks. The

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And await the arrival of our train which is to whirl us through the tunnel. money having been all expended, and further financial aid being lacking, the companywas forced to abandon the enterprise in that year. A New Company. Colonel Haskins, having failed in his attempt to interest addi-tional American capital in his enterprise went to England, where he succeeded inobtaining about two millions of dollars of English money, and a new company wasorganized to take over the franchise, and other assets of the old company. ColonelHaskins in resuming his self-imposed task of uniting New Jersey and Manhattan Islandby an sub-aqueous route had in mind the establishment of a mammoth terminal stationon a site in close proximity to Washington Square, where railroad trains from everysection of the country could discharge passengers and freight. In 1890 the new company, after pushing the tube one thousand, eight hundred feetfurther along toward New York, fell into bankruptcy, and work was again stop

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Image from page 388 of “Wild Spain … records of sport with rifle, rod, and gun, natural history and exploration” (1893)
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Identifier: wildspainrecords00chaprich
Title: Wild Spain … records of sport with rifle, rod, and gun, natural history and exploration
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Chapman, Abel, 1851-1929 Buck, Walter John
Subjects: Hunting — Spain Game and game-birds — Spain
Publisher: London, Gurney and Jackson
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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^ as a Spanish sheep andvoracious as a hyena, would simply put him out of themarket, and eventually land him in bankruptcy. ButSpain cares nothing for modern ideas, and disdains toput herself about in the universal race for wealth. Thereis dignity in her attitude, but there is at least a suspicion

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LAMMERGEYER—A FIRST IMPRESSION. of lassitude. Wliere Nature is prodigal, man becomesproportionately apathetic. Here her gifts more thansuftice for simple tastes and day-to-day requirements, andthe rural Andaluz seeks no more. In agriculture, stock-raising, and other pastoral pursuits,the rudiments of modern system—drainage, irrigation,and the like—are ignored. In the burning heats ofsummer, when every green thing is scorched to death, thecattle die l)}- hundreds from thirst and want of pasturage; 296 WILD SPAIN. in winter, when plains are flooded, and valleys water-logged, the death-rate from cold, want, and disease ishardly less heavy than that of summer. Small wonderthe great bare-necked scavengers of Natm*e increase andflomish. Passing, beneath the twin crags of Las Dos Hermanas,we struck the course of the Majaceite, whose rushingstream, embowered amidst magnificent oleanders, lookedmore like trout than anything we had then seen in thesesierras. Among the mountain streams abo

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