Image from page 699 of “Hardware merchandising March-June 1917” (1917)

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Image from page 699 of “Hardware merchandising March-June 1917” (1917)
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Identifier: hardmerchmarjun1917toro
Title: Hardware merchandising March-June 1917
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

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t is actually made up and a saleresults. Let him take all the credit tohimself. The record kept by this firmmight prove a very interesting sidelighton the machinery behind some of thesepurchases. Never lose sight of anyonewho displays any interest in any line ofthe stores trade. This is the principlethat E. I. Torrens has put into success- sequently their very appearance is a sell-ing factor. The third storey is used forstorage purposes. Goods are receivedthrough a rear door adjacent to thegoods elevator, and are conveyed at onceto the top storey. This leaves the mainselling floor free from any accumulationof surplus stock, and permits of an or-derly arrangement and a clean and at-tractive store. Handsome Display FixtureThe attractive nature of the store isincreased by every modern display fix-ture. On the right-hand side two silentsalesmen appearing in the illustrationaccompanying the article show cutleryand sporting goods. Behind these countersare the cases for sundries of the hard-

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Section of the interior of Torrens Hardware, Tillsonburg, Ont., showing neat arrangement of stock ful operation. Of course, you can often,cultivate a desire for something on thepart of the purchaser, but once a visitorto the store has expressed an interest inany line, it is evident that this first stephas already been taken. Mr. Torrens isalso a firm believer in newspaper andcircular advertising. Circulars are fre-quently mailed to farmer customers. An-other plan is to place advertising litera-ture in parcels of goods purchased byfarmers. A Word About the StoreNow, just a word about the storeitself, for it is decidedly worth a wordof description, being one of the mostcompletely equipped hardware stores inthe section. The store is three storeysin height, and each storey is served by agoods hoist. On the second floor thereis a complete display of stoves. Ampleroom is given for their display, and con- ware trade. The long display of these isbroken by an attractive built-in glasscabinet f

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Image from page 1313 of “Le quincaillier (Juillet-Decembre 1907)” (1907)
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Identifier: lequincaijuidec1907mont
Title: Le quincaillier (Juillet-Decembre 1907)
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Commerce
Publisher: Montréal :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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NOUS OFFRONS POUR LE COMMERCE DAUTOMXKET DHIVER UNE GRANDE VARIETE DE MAR-CHANDISES DE SAISON, NOTAMMENT: Lanternes, Pieges, Chaines,Patins, Crelots, Haches, Codendards, Scies, Orhii+olloriA Pino des Meilleures MarquesV/UUlCllcriC rillC et de Modeles Varies: Services a Decouper SHi!0 Couteaux, Canifs, Rasoirs, Ciseaux, Vaisselle de Table, Etc. MAGASINS ET ENTREPOTS: 297 et 299 Rue St-Paul MONTREAL 1® H nn HHHU HUHHHHHHH w. S HIIW>H n s ws m 1U LE PKIX COURANT siderable, le tout peut rapporter des pro-fits raisonnables. Lidee populaire est quun magasin adeyattemeuts est simplement le groupe-ment, sous un seul toit, dun grand nom-bre de commerces ©Spares. Mais on a

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Atelier de chaussures dans le magasinde Wanamaker, Philadelphie deja essaye de reunir dans un seul maga-sin plusieurs commerces pour diminuer lecout du loyer et dautres frais fixes, eton acesse cet essai qui na pas .reussi. Le suc-ces du magasin a departements repose surun proncipe entierement different: laspecialisation. Les departements nesont pas independants, mais ils formentdes centres dactivite hautement speciali-ses, se conformant a certaines lois fixesqui gouvernent i efcablissement entier. Lancienne metbode de faire les affai-res etait simple et tres elastique. ILe pro-prietaire achetait a aussi bon marchequil pouvait, dhabitude en quantites quinetaient mesurees que par sa oapacitede vente et par son credit. II marquaitles marchandises en signes connus de lui,indiquant quelquefois le cout reel et 11laissait son commis faire autant de pro-fit quil pouvait sur le client. Le pro-prietaire dependait done cOmplletenient delhabilete de ses commis pour son profit;le commis qui en im

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Image from page 422 of “Factory and industrial management” (1891)
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Identifier: factoryindustria12newy
Title: Factory and industrial management
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Engineering Factory management Industrial efficiency
Publisher: New York [etc.] McGraw-Hill [etc.]
Contributing Library: Engineering – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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consideration. In 1887 a profit-sharing system was devised to take the place ofthe contract method. This profit-sharing scheme was based on whatthe management considered a liberal piece-price for producing thefinished work ; this was an arbitrary assumption, based, of course, ona long series of records of the previous cost of the same or similarwares, and this piece-price so fixed on work delivered constituted thedepartments credit. Against this credit the labor cost, files, wasteand oil, and small tools and special tools maintenance were charged;if the charges footing was less than the credit footing,—as it was, Ibelieve, in all cases,— the difference was credited to the department asprofit gained, and one-half was divided among all workers in that de-partment in a flat percentage on wages earned, the company takingthe other half. These contracts were made for from three to fiveyears without variation in piece-rates ; the foremen were paid at day- 4o8 SUCCESSFUL SHOP MANAGEMENT.

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PIERCING THE KEY BOWS. rates from to , and the workmen were paid sometimes day-ratesand sometimes piece rates. The highest gain was as much as thirtyper cent, of wages, which gave every man, foreman and workmanalike, a 15 per cent, addition to his wages at the end of a year. Incase of a foreman who had been a contractor and had made ,000 ayear, and who was, under the profit-sharing system, rated at ^5 perday, or, say, ,500 a year, the 15 per cent, gain would give him,725 for his years pay, instead of, say, ,000, which he inighthave made under the contract system. Common hands, making, say0, would have added, making their total pay 5. Thefaults of this system are the long periods between divisions of gain,and the small incentive to close application on the part of the fore-men. It was abandoned as a general policy in 1893, although profit-sharing was continued in one case up to August, 1895. The method now in use for reducing cost is to divide the wholeforce of w

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