Image from web page 168 of “Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago” (1921)

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Image from web page 168 of “Olcott’s land values blue guide of Chicago” (1921)
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Identifier: olcottslandvalue181928geoc
Title: Olcott’s land values blue guide of Chicago
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Geo. C. Olcott & Co
Subjects: Real home Real property Real residential property Real home Zoning
Publisher: Chicago : Geo. C. Olcott
Contributing Library: The Newberry Library
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of educational and analysis Libraries in Illinois

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Page 43 OLCOTTS LAND VALUES BLUE BOOK MEMORANDA 36 Pa^e 28 v3o >30 Oo OO >3 O OO 05 ^O therefore 2i ■^OOOO |at^raba>ntS^StH^ratH<Ht 0 CARMEN – c OAKS GrOLF uu m- uu i coo 35 ^O ED CD IZZI z cm Z CD 2 CZD Z cm z IZZI ZCCI zCaaJs I 4S 4.0 40 4-0 4-0 40 40 st|^-^-^^^ SUNNY5l<OE AGATITE FOf

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Page 45 OLCOTTS LAND STANDARDS BLUE BOOK Albert J. Ross Frank C. Voisinet R. H. Thomas, Jr. = (»^ Ray W. Summe Ray M. Fouts Central InvestmentCompany Second Mortgages Construction financing property Contracts Refinancing 5613 Lawrence Avenue PALISADE 6000 CS88S®8g8S888®SS8SSgS®®8SSS®88S88S888gSS888SS3g®888?!?< Webpage 29 37

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Image from page 170 of “Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago” (1921)
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Identifier: olcottslandvalue181928geoc
Title: Olcott’s land values blue book of Chicago
12 Months: 1921 (1920s)
Writers: Geo. C. Olcott & Co
Subjects: Real home Real home Real property Real property Zoning
Publisher: Chicago : Geo. C. Olcott
Contributing Library: The Newberry Library
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and analysis Libraries in Illinois

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Page 45 OLCOTTS LAND STANDARDS BLUE BOOK Albert J. Ross Frank C. Voisinet R. H. Thomas, Jr. = (»^ Ray W. Summe Ray M. Fouts Central InvestmentCompany 2nd Mortgages Construction debts Real Estate Contracts Refinancing 5613 Lawrence Avenue PALISADE 6000 CS88S®8g8S888®SS8SSgS®®8SSS®88S88S888gSS888SS3g®888?!?< Page 29 37

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yfi^nn^nfi mn nn^m^nn^ U 70 1 75 1 E 1 1 WIL-SON 75 0 0 3 0 0 0 C i S[^>^ CD^im (0 (fl §U UU Ul 0 ro fo rt P oULI ULI UU UL 1 c a ^^o J( 1 ? 3^ Z< 1 0 ^, 00 0 ^5 1 v^ D $ ^ i.2 czi izzT tz: mi CD ED cn im ds OO too too loo loo lOO AV (ZD CZD CZI fi PEINSACOLA S5 AV c u Li_ DM PI nn nn nn 0 0 P in 1 ? in /..

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Image from page 31 of “Hastings’ seeds : spring 1915 catalogue” (1915)

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Image from page 31 of “Hastings’ seeds : spring 1915 catalogue” (1915)
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Identifier: hastingsseedsspr1915hgha
Title: Hastings’ seeds : spring 1915 catalogue
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: H.G. Hastings Co H.G. Hastings Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection
Subjects: Nurseries (Horticulture) Catalogs Vegetables Seeds Catalogs Flowers Seeds Catalogs Fruit Seeds Catalogs
Publisher: Atlanta, Ga. : H.G. Hastings & Co.
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

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fine in heavy storms. MortgageLifter makes 37 to 40 per cent lint which, combined with its heavybearing qualities, makes it one of the most valuable varieties. Plant grows large and strong, roots deep and is a wonderful drought resister. It is the only highly bred up variety of largewhite seeded, extra big-boll cotton offered for sale. Has the longestof lint and has brought as high as M\:j cents as against a generalmarket price of >>.2 cents. On upland either rich or poor you will find Mortgage Lifter asplendid variety. Pound, postpaid, 35 cents; 3 pounds, postpaid, to your address, .00; peck, by ex-press or freight, not prepaid, 60 cents; bushel (30 pounds Georgia legal weight), notprepaid, .75; 10 bushels, not prepaid, .00; 100 pounds, not prepaid, S5.00.Freight rate to Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma points is .08 per 100 pounds. PRICES 2G H. G. Hastings Sf Co., Seedsmen, Atlanta, Georgia. MATCHLESS EXTRA EARLY BIG BOLL A SURE ENOUGH BOLL WEEVIL BEATING BIG BOLL COTTON

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Kings Extra Early Hastings Matchless Extra Early Big Boll Cotton A standard extra early variety; close. Makes 30 to 35 per cent lint. Our seed Is grown in extremeNorth Georgia and is the real genuine King. Pound, postpaid, 20c;3 pounds, 50c. Not prepaid, peck, 50c; bushel, .25; 10 bushels,.00; 100 pounds, .00. Write for prices on larger quantities.RllSSell Bit? Boll n late variety; 85 to 90 per cent ■ green seed. Strong, vigorous grower, hut very late and should not be planted in any section where easi-ness of crop is desired. Pound, postpaid, 20c; 3 pounds, 50c; peck,not prepaid, 50c; bushel, .25; 10 bushels, .00; 100 pounds, .00.Write for special prices on larger quantities. We introduced this superb new cotton lastyear and reports coming to us from practicallyevery cotton-growing state are unusually fa-vorable. Our illustration does not do it jus-tice. We have been growing and watching itin field culture ever since 1910 and every yearwe are more and more pleased wit

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Image from page 10 of “Pittston gazette centennial hand-book, 1778-1878 : one hundredth anniversary of the battle and massacre of Wyoming, July 3 & 4, 1878 : containing a complete historical sketch of Wyoming Valley ..” (1878)
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Identifier: pittstongazettec00gaze
Title: Pittston gazette centennial hand-book, 1778-1878 : one hundredth anniversary of the battle and massacre of Wyoming, July 3 & 4, 1878 : containing a complete historical sketch of Wyoming Valley ..
Year: 1878 (1870s)
Authors: Gazette Print. (Firm : Pittston, Pa.) D. Davidsburg (Firm : Wilkes-Barre, Pa.)
Subjects: Wyoming Massacre, 1778
Publisher: Pittston, Pa. : Gazette Print.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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JLl, GAZETTE BUILDING, iFITTSTOIsT, :Eu^., Does Job Printing of all kinds, and keeps on hand a full supply of Stationery for all kinds of work. OQilETIl y fill ?ieis iMiis, DEEDS, MORTGAGES, NOTES, &C., FOR SALE. —Prints to Order- LETTER HEADS,ENVELOPES, BILL HEADS, STATEMENTS,CIRCULARS, BALL PROGRAMMES,DODGERS, PROGRAMMES, INVITATIONS.BALL TICKETS,POSTERS. PAPER BOOKS,AT LOWEST CASH RATES. ESTIMATES FURNISHED, f, SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. ® (6) 1^1!^. AUKmEN.

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» Carries a Full Stock of Eyei\ythingIN THE -Rai^p^^ai^e Line. ifS ^^ p, Kf eiF ALREADY GROUND FOR IMMEDIATE USE. The ^^Bristor Grain Cradk M ¥ FWEEM AMI A ^<. Best quality Goods of standard malies at prices to suit the times, (7)

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Image from page 346 of “Our firemen. A history of the New York fire departments, volunteer and paid … 650 engravings; 350 biographies.” (1887)

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Image from page 346 of “Our firemen. A history of the New York fire departments, volunteer and paid … 650 engravings; 350 biographies.” (1887)
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Identifier: ourfiremenhistor00cost
Title: Our firemen. A history of the New York fire departments, volunteer and paid … 650 engravings; 350 biographies.
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Costello, Augustine E.
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, A. E. Costello
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: The Durst Organization

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lIt K I R K M K N. 311 tbfl most elevated grounds. The company made several attempts to procurewater, but I>eing satisfied by their experiments of tin; impracticability of tin:undertaking, the concern fell through. In L825 five additional cisterns were ordered to be constructed. In conse-quence of a serious (ire in the Eighth Ward, tbe lire companies were orderedto 1111 all the public cisterns with water. Two years later (IS.*;) seven addi-tional cisterns were ordered ; eighteen more in 1828, and sixteen additionalones in 1829. The city then possessed forty public cisterns, at an estimatedCOBl of twenty-four thousand dollars. Each cistern contained usually aboutone hundred hogsheads of water. But the supply of water was neverthelessinsufficient. At least sixty additional cisterns were required for that portionof the city between Fourteenth and Grand Streets on Broadway, and Four-teenth and Pearl Streets on Chatham Street, and on the east side. It was

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THIRTEENTH STREET RESERVOIR AND WASHINGTON INSTITUTE.[Thirteenth Street and Fourth Avenue.] therefore recommended that the city lay down two lines of iron pipe, for thesecurity of the city in the section mentioned The firemen built a cistern under the entrance-way to the Old FiremensHall in Fulton Street. This was the first cistern ever built in the city, andcontained a hundred hogsheads of water. Engine Companies Nos. 13, 18, 21,and -J4 share the credit of this work. Much disagreement and dissension appear to have prevailed amongcitizens and officials as to the propriety of making the cost of constructingcisterns a public charge. Fully a year had been occupied with such dissen-sions, when, finally, on March 29, 1827, the Committee on Assessments of theCommon Council reported favorably for making the cost of cisterns a publiccharge. This report was negatived. Public cisterns were, however, estab-lished for the use of the Department, some twenty-five additional having beenerected up to

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Image from web page 75 of “Goaks and tears” (1875)

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Image from page 75 of “Goaks and rips” (1875)
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Identifier: goakstears00quad
Title: Goaks and rips
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: Quad, M., 1842-1924
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston, H.L. Shepard & Co.
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Roman nose, carried on the complete stranger; thou canst perhaps not say i will be a lord or a duke in disguise. And I dont care a cent! Are you going to spend ? Was we planning to change these fragments of lumber into silver? queriedthe complete stranger, while he organized some pine tooth-picks. The clerk arrived associated with the workplace,— obtaining the lean satchel in hishand,— and then he took the stranger to the home, banged him with greatgood will, and pointed up the road. I-go, stated the person, in a solemn vocals, nevertheless when my retainersarrive I shall seek revenge — human being gore will probably be shed to satisfyme! NOVEMBER. 67 you wish to gore right-away from right here — quick–smart! ex-claimed the clerk. He moved. Their face was clouded for a moment, but then a grand smilecovered it, and then he ended a newsboy and asked,— My faithful minion, canst thou direct us to an office across doorof which hangs the traditionary golden balls of base money-lender— a place where i might exchange several precious heirlooms for some viledross? Plus the son performed.

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Twelvth Mo7ith. DECEMBER. 31 Days. Sunday 3 | lo | 17 | 24 | 31 Monday 4 | 11 | 18 | 25 | Diesday 5 | 12 | 19 | 26 | Wedtiesday 6 | 13 | 20 | 27 | Thursday 7 | 14 | 21 | 28 | Friday i| 8I15I22I29I Saturday 2 | 9 | 16 | 23.I 30 | Nevada saloon – keeperscommence to saw their particular whis-key into ten-cent chunks. Don Quixote came to be inthis month. Final guy gets away fromSaratoga, plus the bell-boysgo up to the store to hurry-up those diamond pins. Fire businesses satisfy and declare the period features established betterthan could have been expected. People who got drunk on election day are now able to turn a cornerwithout moving off the sidewalk. DouBTABiLiTiES.— ist to 3d.— Buy Lake Shore. 3d to fifth.— Grease the doorsteps and get ready for business. fifth to nth.—Mother-in-law begins to develop sassy. Dogs howlmournfully. Look out for storms on Lake Erie. Old women begin toremember the Morgan excitement. 5th to 9th.— Stable your ducks. 9th to sixteenth.— Frost begins to spook

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Image from web page 59 of “The normal history of Uk birds, or, A selection of the absolute most rare, gorgeous and interesting birds which inhabit this nation : the information from Systema naturae of Linnaeus : with basic findings, often original
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Identifier: naturalhistoryof31796dono
Title: The all-natural reputation for Uk birds, or, an array of probably the most rare, beautiful and interesting birds which inhabit this nation : the explanations through the Systema naturae of Linnaeus : with basic findings, either initial or collected from newest and a lot of esteemed English ornithologists : and adorned with figures, drawn, engraved, and coloured from initial specimens
12 Months: 1794 (1790s)
Authors: Donovan, E. (Edward), 1768-1837 Latham, John, 1740-1837 Pennant, Thomas, 1726-1798 Gilbert, Richard, 1794-1852, printer Donovan, E. (Edward), 1768-1837. Normal history of the nests and eggs of Brit wild birds Linné, Carl von, 1707-1778. Systema naturae. Regnum animale F. and C. Rivington (Firm), writer F., C. and J. Rivington (company), writer Law and Gilbert, printer R. & R. Gilbert (Firm), printer Leverian Museum (London, The United Kingdomt)
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: London : Printed for the writer, and for F. and C. Rivington …
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity History Library

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age Hawk. Edw. 225. male.Hen-harrier. Pennants Brit. Appliance N° 58. /, 28*Lath. Gen. Syn. I. p. 88. 74, F 3U PLATE LIX. Le Lanier cendre. Brif. orn. I. p. 365. N° 17.Le Foucon a Collier. Do. 1. />. 345. N° 7. ;»#&.LOifTeau St. Martin. Buff. oif. 1. />. 212.—PL enl 459.Grau-weiiTe Geyer. Frijch. I. 79. 80,Rubetarius. TurnerL numerous authors have fuppofed the Ring-tail is the female of theHen-harrier, but Mr. Pennant does not fubfcribe for this generalopinion ; he obferves regarding the Ring-tail, from fome belated obferva-tions by the infallible rule of diffe&ion, males have already been discovered ofthis fpecies. And Mr. Latham, after noticing the viewpoint ofPennant, fays, for this I may include my personal obfervations; theBird we today polfefs, as an Englijh fpecimen, becoming fet straight down in mynotes as a male. The Hen-harrier is extremely deftructive on young chicken, fkimsthe surface with regards to flies, and will not perch on trees. Lengthfeventeen ins, breadth three feet three ins^ body weight twelveounces. PLATE 6o

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PLATE LX. MOTACILLA RUBETRA. WHINCHAT. Passe res.Bill conic, pointed, Noftrils oval, wide, naked. GENERIC CHARACTER. Bill ftrait, {lender. Tongue jagged. PARTICULAR CHARACTER AND STNO NTMS. Above reddifh brown, with dark fpots. Beneath reddifh yellow,a white flroke over the eye, and a broad one below it. Two whitefpots regarding wings. Upper half the tail white, reduced 1 / 2 black.Bill, mouth and legs black. Motacilla Rubetra. Lin. Syji. Nat. i. 186, 18. edit. 10.^ Scop. Ann. i. N° 237.Kram. eh p. 375. N° 5,Whinchat. Rati Syn. p. 76. A. 3.Will. Orn. p. 22J.Penn. Brit. Z00L I. I.Lath. Gen. Syn. 4. 454. 54. Le PLATE LX. Lc grand Traquet, ou le Tarier. Brif. orn. 3. p, 432. N° 26. pi 24./. 1. Buff. off. 5. p. 224.—PL enl 678. /. 2.Geftettenfehlagar. j£r«w. 375.Groffer Fliegenfuenger. Frijch. f. 22. It is a typical Bird in mod: areas of Europe. In Englandit is feen when you look at the North just in fummer ; however in the South it con-tinues the whole year. Its frequently feen in the heaths w

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Image from web page 335 of “Germany;” (1912)
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Identifier: germanypainted00dick
Title: Germany;
12 Months: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Dickie, James F., 1848- Compton, Edward Theodore, ill Compton, E. Harrison (Edward Harrison), sick
Subjects: Germany — information and travel
Publisher: London : A. & C. Black
Adding Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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price right here ended up being the stormiest ofwhich history bears accurate documentation, and underneath the chargeof treason he had been virtually expelled. The city hasseen Gustavus Adolphus and Tilly within its walls.It had additionally a number of visits from Napoleon. Hence ithas a most notable history. From 1816 to 1866 the German Parliament heldits sessions here. Bismarck ended up being probably the most dis-tinguished person in that human body. Through the firstyear of his sojourn the landlord associated with housewhere he lodged took away the dining table bell he usedto phone the servants when he had letters for thepost. He rang therefore frequently that landlord tookthis bold step. When Bismarck had their corre-spondence ready once more become carried into post-office, he fired a pistol. The landlord, alarmedat the loud report, hurried in. Bismarck coollyaddressed him and said, Sir, you took away mybell, I really had recourse into the only strategy ofsummoning a servant that has been left. It’s needlessto state your bell was at as soon as restored to itsplace. COBURG—DUCAL CASTLE AND PARK

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THE LUTHER LAND 135 Bismarck was right here once more on a far more historicoccasion, in May 1871, if the treaty of peacebetween Germany and France had been finalized. Thatnight the fountains in Frankfort ran with wine. Frankfort was long the 2nd mercantile cityof Germany, Hamburg becoming the initial. It hasalways already been the Banking-house and also the ExchangeCity of the Fatherland. In the Juden Gasse theold dwelling-place of Meyer Anselm Bauer, thefounder of famous Rothschild Bank, is stillstanding. Here he established himself as a money-lender on sign Zum rothem Schilde. We haveoften heard a classic lady, who had been created in 1791 andlived till 1882, tell exactly how she had been often withher parent in the little straight back parlour of the home Zum rothem Schilde. She had numerous interestingstories to tell of creator of this Rothschildfortunes. With this humble venture inside JudenGasse sprang the fantastic European Banking-house,without whose help no European energy would cryhavoc and allow slip the puppies of war. Some paces distan

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Image from page 12 of “The training of workers in trades and industries” (1920)

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Identifier: trainingofworker00univ
Title: The training of workers in trades and industries
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: University of Texas at Austin
Subjects: Vocational education
Publisher: Austin : The University
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Pattern Shop—San Antonio men with good trades are hampered in making a livingnowadays. Vocational education creates a demand for and broadensthe field of general education. The Federal and State Governments will help your localboard finance vocational work. The Director of Tradeand Industrial Education will gladly give information re-garding vocational schools of every type, courses of study,equipment, organization, and assist you in finding qualifiedteachers. Remember that classes along the line of general educa-tion can be opened for the young worker who has left schoolbefore completing common school or high school. Theseclasses are usually organized in general continuation schools. The Training of Woi-kers in Trades and Industries 11

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The Dam at Austin Types of Trade and Industrial Schools all-day unit trade schools Aim.—To teach the boy or girl the fundamentals of atrade. Who are the students?—Boys and girls who are not yetemployed, but who wish to learn a trade. When is the school open?—All day, at least five days aweek. Courses vary from one to four years. What subjects are taught? Shop Subjects The Building Trades.Auto Mechanics.Blacksmithing.Sheet Metal Work.Machine Shop Work.Patternmaking.Electrical Work.Dressmaking.Flower and FeatherMaking. Many other trades depending on the local demand,half of each day is spent in the shop. Millinery. Garment Machine Oper-ating. Straw Hat MachineOperating. Gas and Electric Weld-ing. Printing. Painting and Decorating. Bricklaying. One- 12 University of Texas Bulletin

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Image from page 726 of “Daily attractions in New York. Advance information of art exhibitions, lectures, concerts, churches, theatres, railroads, Pullman accommodations, points of interest, where to dine, etc. ..” (1906)
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Identifier: dailyattractions17newy
Title: Daily attractions in New York. Advance information of art exhibitions, lectures, concerts, churches, theatres, railroads, Pullman accommodations, points of interest, where to dine, etc. ..
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Advertising New York (N.Y.) — Guidebooks
Publisher: [New York] Daily attractions in New York (inc.)
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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string QuartetteHarp Trio Piano Trio Open for EnKagemenU (or leadinf andSammer Hotels MISS M. D. GRAZIA PIANIST-DIRCCTOR 63 GRAND ST. JAMAICA, L. I. House—East 149th st., betweenBrobk and Bergen aves. OpensSaturday night, August 30th.H. H. Frazee presents FineFeathers. A modern playwhich takes place in a mod-est Staten Island bungalow—followed in the last scenes inan expensive suburban home. Itis a study of domesticity and AUTOS TO HIRE 6-CYLINDER PIERCE ARROW AND PEERLESS CARS HOUR DAY WEEK OR MONTHRATES ON APPLICATION TELEPHONE, 5052 COLUMBUSPeerless Auto Rental Service 21 DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK

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Sight-SeeingYACHTS Yachts Observation and Tourist all around NewYork Harbor and ManhattanIsland every day at 10.30 a. m,and 2.30 p.m. Yacht HalcyOn makes a trip every day at 1.15 p. m. down the Bayto see the Forts, Sandy Hook, Scotland Lightship, Quarantine and the Ocean, returningat 5 p. m. Both yachts leave from Battery Park Pier, near South Ferry foot ofBroadway. Telephone, Broad 3373. NEW YORK THEATRES-Continued – finance, depicting the usual re- Cort—4<Sth st., east of Broadway. | suit of what happens to thosewho live beyond their income—in this case—a young man andhis wife. The cast includes Rob-ert Edson, Wilton Lackaye, RoseCoghlan, Max Figman, LolitaRobertson, and Amelia Sumers.Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat.,2.15. Prices, 25c. to .Comedy—West 41st St., east ofBway. Tel., 5194 Bryant.Closed.

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Identifier: annualreport891901021newy
Title: Annual report
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: New York (Condition). Forest, Fish and Game Commission
Topics: Forests and forestry Fisheries Game and game-birds
Publisher: [Albany, N.Y. : The Commission]
Adding Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity History Library

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10,000 Lake Trout fry 49,000 Lake Trout fingerlings 1,000 Rainbow Trout fry 12,000 Pike-Perch . . . . ; 300,000 Shad 1,250,000 Smelt 5,160,000 Tomcods 34,700,000 Whitefish 250,000 Total 42,361,800 DELAWARE HATCHERY. Brook Trout fry 95,000 Brook Trout fingerlings 45,500 Brook Trout yearlings 39,000 Brown Trout fry 100,000 Brown Trout fingerlings 72,000 Total 35^,5°° FULTON CHAIN HATCHERY. Brook Trout fry 260,000 Grayling Trout fry 180,000 Rainbow Trout fry 20,000 Frostfish 2,795,000 complete 3,255,000 ONEIDA HATCHERY. Pike-Perch 60,280,000 Whitefish 10,366,000 Complete 70,646,000 WOODLAND, FISH AND GAME COMMISSION.PLEASANT VALLEY HATCHERY. Brook Trout fry 145,000 Brook Trout fingerlings 98,000 Brook Trout yearlings 9,000 Brown Trout fry 165,000 Brown Trout fingerlings 81,000 Brown Trout yearlings . 30,500 Lake Trout fingerlings 47,000 Lake Trout yearlings 48,500 Rainbow Trout fingerlings 32,000 Rainbow Trout yearlings 14,500 Total ……. ..:..:.. . 670,500 Grand total production 140,981,055 153

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Report of tfye Cfyief Game Protector 1903 To tl)e Forest, Pisl) and (iame Commission: GENTLEMEN.— According to your directions We hereby publish areport associated with company of my division for year ending on Septem-ber 30, 1903. It shows the job carried out by the power of protectors inthe bringing of activities, the actual quantity of recoveries in fines and charges, and thetime offered in prison by several people; the number and value of nets and otherdevices for taking of fish which, while used in violation of law, wereseized and ruined; extent gotten the purchase of the timber confiscatedfrom trespassers who had been lumbering on State land, plus the purchase of oldabandoned buildings, and a listing of the licensed nets operated bycommercial anglers, aided by the costs obtained; the amount and value of the fishcaught during the year, along with other matters of great interest. Much credit flow from the Legislature for valuable amendments, passed at thelast session, which secu

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Image from web page 37 of “The Kindergarten magazine” (1891)
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Identifier: kindergartenmaga10chic
Title: The Kindergarten magazine
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Writers:
Subjects: Kindergarten
Publisher: [Chicago, Ill. : Kindergarten Magazine Co.]
Adding Library: National-Louis University Library, Archives and Specialized Choices
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois

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al headquartersduring their particular stay.The Froebel Unionentertained all visit-ing kindergartners ata reception on theevening of Wednes-day, July 7, with MissCaroline T. Havenand Dr. Hailmann asthe leading guests ofthe evening. Mem-bers associated with the WomansClub of the Milwau-kee KindergartenAssociation and ofthe Womans SchoolAlliance assisted atthis reception. Mu-sic had been furnished both for programs of preschool de-partment, as well as the kinder-symphony deserves special men-tion, which was conducted by Miss Kippenberger, theFroebel Union as a body participating in it. MISS MARY C. MCCULLOCH, OF ST. LOUIS, spoke in her own normal impressive way about Idealsto be recognized by the Kindergarten Supervisor, and asa fitting effect skip McCulloch was unanimouslyelected, on suggestion of nomination committee,to act as the kindergarten division president for thecoming 12 months. Skip Caroline T. Haven deserves great credit for havingmade the Kindergarten Department of this N. E. A. success-

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Skip SARAH C. BROOKS. THE KINDERGARTNERS MEET AT MILWAUKEE. 25 ful. We would recommend this lady practical solution to thefuture officers with this division, particularly the giving outof the advance announcement for the system as very early asthe month of April. Toward the close associated with the sessions associated with the kindergartenmeetings at Milwaukee, a few days ended up being specialized in the in-terests regarding the Global Kindergarten Union. The sec-ond yearly report had been look over by the secretary, and copieswere afterward distributed to those current. This reportwill be provided for all limbs ahead of the start of the reg-ular conferences of those businesses. It absolutely was the intention to have abstracts of a number of impor-tant reports of St. Louis conference read at Milwaukee,and these have been duly ready; but owing to the extremeheat plus the lateness of the hour it had been deemed advisable toomit all of them from program. The entire reports of most thepapers will be given, and copies is supposed to be delivered free tomembers of this union. T THE

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Image from page 224 of “[Course catalog]” (1909)

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Identifier: coursecatalog7475nort
Title: [Course catalog]
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Northeastern University (Boston, Mass.) Boston Young Men’s Christian Association Northeastern University Preparatory School (Boston, Mass.) Huntington School for Boys (Boston, Mass.)
Subjects: Northeastern University (Boston, Mass.) Universities and colleges
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : Northeastern University
Contributing Library: Northeastern University, Snell Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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Porter, M.Ed. William F. Brady, Jr., B.S. Coordinator of Graduate Coop- Educational Placement erative Education Officer Kenneth E. Schongold, B.S. Francis L. Heuston, M.Ed. Graduate and ProfessionalSchool Counselor Thomas J. McEneaney, M.Ed. Counseling and placement services are available to seniors andalumni of all of the programs offered by Northeastern University.Through this department, representatives of hundreds of compa-nies are scheduled to visit the campus each year for the specificpurpose of interviewing seniors for employment after graduation.Lists of job opportunities are maintained for seniors and alumniseeking openings for which they may be qualified. The Department of Graduate Placement Services is also respon-sible for the referral of graduate students enrolled in programsoperated on the Cooperative Plan to assignments designed tosupplement classroom work. It also supplies counseling informa-tion to students who wish to continue their education at the gradu-ate level.

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The Center forCooperative Education DirectorFACULTY Paul E. Dube, M.A., M.Ed. Project Coordinator Stephanie D. Urban, B.A. Overseas Placement Director Donald R. Allen, Ph.D. 224 / Cooperative Education Assistant Director andDirector of Training Rhona E. Wolfe, M.Ed. Training Assistant Barbara J. Reid, B.A. Educational institutions and other organizations exploring, devel-oping, expanding, or improving programs in cooperative educa-tion contact the Center for a variety of services. All facets of theestablishment, operation, and expansion of programs may be ex-plored with professional consultants familiar with all aspects ofcooperative education. Intensive short-term training workshops for both new and ex-perienced coordinators of cooperative programs and the four-week Summer Institute in Cooperative Education offering eightquarter hours of credit are among the services offered by theCenter. The CooperativeEducation ResearchCenter FACULTY Director James W. Wilson, Ph.D., Professor of Co

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Image from page 158 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
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Identifier: bellvol24telephonemag00amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: BayNet

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is fine record have every faith and confidence that, will be maintained. Whos Who & Whats Whatin This Issue The willing, courteous, and effective as-sistance of many members of the Army andNavy, of all ranks, is evident in the sec-tion of this issue dealing with ElectricalCommunications in IVorld-ivide Warfare.Without their aid and counsel the neces-sary information could not have been com-piled nor the photographs obtained. Andsince it is not practicable to make acknowl-edgment here to so many individuals, theeditors express in this fashion their sincere thanks and appreciation to all those in theServices whose help has made possible sounusual a feature in these pages. Neither is it feasible to give credits in-dividually for so many photographs. Theywere secured—with a few exceptions—from the Armys Bureau of Public Rela-tions, the Signal Corps, the Army AirForces, the Navy, the Marine Corps, andthe Coast Guard. They give abundant evi-dence of the splendid work of the Services

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James J. Pilliou Harold L. Ryan George H. Jess 132 Bell Telephone Magazine photographic sections in making a pictorialrecord of every aspect of this war. It is a startling picture of long distanceservice in the not too remote future whichJames J. Pilliod and Harold L. Ryanpaint. As assistant chief engineer, and as-sistant vice president in charge of the traf-fic division, respectively, of the A, T. & T.Companys Department of Operation andEngineering, they are in key positions todiscuss the equipment and methods whichwill make operator toll dialing possible ona nation-wide basis, and the improvementsin service which will come with it. Starting with the Long Lines Depart-ment in 1908, Mr. Pilliod had become by1914 its division plant engineer in Chi-cago. In New York since 1918, he hadbeen successively the Departments engineerof transmission, engineer, and general man-age before transferring to his present post in 1943. Mr. Ryans Bell System career,entirely devoted to work in traffic

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Image from page 160 of “Washington (District of Columbia), city directory” (1921)
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Identifier: washingtondistri00unse
Title: Washington (District of Columbia), city directory
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Polk
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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s, Suits Overcoats and Coats MERCANTILE AGENCIES JOS. P. CUIiliEN L.EO B. ABERNETHV MARTIN J. McNAMARA Pre*—Gen I. Mgr. V. Pres.-Asst. Mgr. Counsel Established 11)11 ^^^^^^ Incorporated 1918 EFFICIENT CULLED crl> SERVICE PROMPT 1416 F STREET N. W. ^ KELLOGG BUILDING CONFIDENTIAL AGENTS A Service on Credit Reports, Colled ions and Investigating Employees Unequaled. Phone Main 7043—youll be convinced. Reference—Any Bank, Newspaper and First-Class Merchant or Professional Man. METAL CEILINGS Estimates Cheerfully Given Erecting by Experts THOS. E. ALLISON Metal Ceiling and Metal Sidewall Contractor All Work Positively Guaranteed19 Years Experience 640 and 642 Penna. Avenue S. E. Phone Lincoln 2649 (1921) BOYDS DIRECTORY OF TH 180 MIMEOGRAPHING PHONE FRANKLIN 1888 Commercial Office Service A PROVEN SERVICE ENTIRE FIRST FLOOR, BALTIC BUILDING606 F STREET MIMEOGRAPHING MULTIGRAPHING TYPEWRITING ADDRESSOGRAPHING STENOGRAPHING PRINTING FOLDING MAILING MONUMENTS TELEPHONE FRANKLIN 6949

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ESTABLISHED 1885 Monuments THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF FINISHED MONUMENTS ONDISPLAY FROM WHICH TO SELECT. YOUR INSPECTION IS INVITED. BUYING MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS FROM PHOTO-GRAPHS OR DESIGNS OFTEN RESULT IN DISAPPOINTMENT. MAKEYOUR SELECTION NOW OF A FINISHED MONUMENT FOR IMMEDI-ATE OR FUTURE DELIVERY. PHILIP SMITH OFFICE, WORKS, DISPLAY YARD: FIRST AND B STREETS S. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. m MfnuiFuni«.,m WM m ■fl m t mm > mm | DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (1921)

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Image from page 485 of “Canadian grocer January-March 1918” (1918)

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Identifier: cangrocerjanmar1918toro
Title: Canadian grocer January-March 1918
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Supermarkets Grocery trade Food industry and trade
Publisher: Toronto : Maclean-Hunter Pub. Co. [1887]-
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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[■xmaoodcicia Q This coupon will H □ connect you with the ■| Checkerboard Calf Club £ Si With trip nhipit. nf incrpaaincr tVio Aliioe «— ■ D ■D■ ■ ■ y ■ D ■P ■ y D ■GHDHnHDHDHDBDanaEnDBn With the object of increasing the Alliesmeat supplies this club is offering valu-able prizes to boys and girls in ruralcommunities for the best calf fed on Purina Calf Chow the great calf-raising food.We are telling the public about the clubthrough forceful consumer advertisingand good grocers everywhere are cash-ing in on the increasing demand forPurina. You can do the same. Sign,clip and mail this couponnow. Lively selling andgood profits willresult S y S y THE CHISHOLMMILLING CO. LimitedTORONTO y y xy ^ y y .-vc y ** & & JF ^>6 4* ■& sN D■ ■ ■D■ ■D■ ■D■□■D 18 CANADIAN GROCER February 38, 1918.

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OXFORD cLlIE Show Keens in your displays—keepit where the housewife will see it. She knows Keens and just needs tobe reminded that you are selling it. Magor, Son and Company, Limited 191 St. Paul St. West, MONTREAL 30 Church Street, TORONTO AGENTS FOR THE DOMINION OF CANADA Keens Oxford Blue is always aseller and every sale gives you agood margin. Keep well stocked. FISH FOR LENT SALTED LAKE HERRING Headless and Dressed60 fish to a pail, .85 30 fish to a pail, .10 BILL FISH Headless and Dressed, 20 pound pails, .40 SPECIALLY PUT UP IN FAMILY SIZENO WASTE NO HANDLING Also full line of Frozen, Salted and Smoked Sea and Lake Fish J. BOWMAN & CO. WHOLESALE 66 JARVIS ST. TORONTO, ONT. Canadian Grocer Vol. XXXII. TORONTO, FEBRUARY 22, 1918 No. 8 Consumers Assn. in the Limelight A Merchandizing Activity That Has Attracted Considerable Notice Receives SomeAttention From the Government—Some Discussion as to the Methods of Operation of This Concern Toronto, Feb. 20. (Special)—Th

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Image from page 1276 of “Canadian grocer July-December 1908” (1908)
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Identifier: cangrocerjulydec1908toro
Title: Canadian grocer July-December 1908
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Supermarkets Grocery trade Food industry and trade
Publisher: Toronto : Maclean-Hunter Pub. Co. [1887]-
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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was not madefree it would be well to have a transfer as to limiting the amount of purchaseto say 50 cents worth for free delivery,the time for consumers to consider sucha fact is now. There is no meichant sooverworked, so overtaxed, and no mer-chant asked to do so much free ofcharge as the groceryman. The buying public are the ones togive this article some thought, andthey are the ones to lend their assist-ance to help the average grocer withsome of these problems brought aboutby his aims to please the public in somany ways free of charge. The above sounds first rate in print,and theoretically the idea is all right,but any man who has been in the gro-cery business long enough to understandthe matter thoroughly, will admit thatit will be a long time before the con-suming public will accept and abide bythe ideas outlined above. Co-operationamongst the merchants with the idea ofcentralizing and reducing the cost ofthat department to a minimum, is morepractical and will command more care-

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CANADIAN GROCERY INTERIORS—McConnell Bros. Moosejaw. Store of Quality,- company or an automobile service han-dle goods for the combined grocers. These deductions might not suit allgrocers (that is. big and little grocers),but there is no argument that will downthe facts that the free delivery of goodsis a big expense, and one that is in-creasing; and one that is, sooner orlater, going to be handled by a com-pany organized for that purpose, whereall buyers will get the same benefit,country buyers and city buyers alike,where the person carrying his own goodsis allowed for this service, and all arecharged a lower price for groceries thanthey are now paying. This argument may be a trifle aheadof time at the present moment, as torelation to not delivering groceries, but 79 ful consideration at the hands of theup-to-date retail merchant.—Trade. CRAZY WITH THE HEAT. Can you tell me what steam is?asked the examiner. Why, sure, sir, replied Patrick con-fidently. Steam ist—why—er—itsw

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Image from page 268 of “Canadian grocer January-June 1898” (1898)
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Identifier: cangrocerjanjune1898toro
Title: Canadian grocer January-June 1898
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Supermarkets Grocery trade Food industry and trade
Publisher: Toronto : Maclean-Hunter Pub. Co. [1887]-
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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Eby, Blain Co.,Limited, have the goods. Back orders for Circle tea are nowbeing filled by Lucas, Steele & Bristol.They have lately had a new machine placedin their warehouse for packing, the first ofthe kind ever seen in Canada. W. H. Gillard & Co. are offeiing specialvalues in teas to retail at 30 to 35c. Theseteas, say the firm, leave a handsomemargin for the retailer, as well as give un-bounded satisfaction to the consumer. Rutherford, Marshall & Co. are making aspecialty of putting up honey in 5, 10, and60-lb. tins, suitable for shipment to theKlondyke. This commodity is an excel-lent substitute for butter or fruit, and cannotbe injured by frost. DEMAND FOR CHEESE. The London Grocers Gazette, speakingof the cheese situation says : The marketfor cheese has been passing through one ofits spells of dulness again, but this time thedull period has been protracted to a some- Why Not Have aPermanent Ceiling ? One that is highly artistic, and will giveyou lasting satisfaction.

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Our EMBOSSED METALLIC PLATES For Ceilings and Walls Give handsome effects that cant be excelled, andare also fire proof and hygienic. Can be easilycleaned, and never crack or drop off, like plaster. 150 designs to choose from, with borders andmouldings to match. Send for our catalogue, and learn of their manyadvantages. Prices are in everyones reach. Metallic Roofing Co., Limited TORONTO what inordinate and trying length, havinglasted for several months. The trade hasbeen an unsatisfactory one all round, bothas regards the demand and as to results toimporters, whose operations have been forthe most part the reverse of remunerative.The commencement of the restriction of thedemand seems to have dated from about thetime when buyers here began to show anxietyto secure the autumn make forward,and this had the effect of driving prices upbeyond the limit at which cheese sells freely.The reason why such anxiety should havebeen displayed this season is difficult of ex-planation, as the knowled

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Image from page 182 of “The Obelisk.” (1922)

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Identifier: obelisk1922sout
Title: The Obelisk.
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Southern Illinois State Normal University
Subjects: Southern Illinois State Normal University Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Publisher: Carbondale, Ill. : Southern Illinois Normal University
Contributing Library: Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois

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s,ind Row—Halene Street, Arline Cliappee, Glenn Ayre, Agues Lentz, Rosalie Comment, Edward Wilson, Leah Cockrum.?.rd Row—Velma Harrison, Madeline Bradley, Mary VanSiekle, Mary Dexter, Zee FuUerton, Gladys Bradley, Virginia FuUenwider, Hazel Rendleman.4th Row—Mary Conatser, Grace Eagleson, Aline Nettzger, Alice Barrow, Grace Wiggs, Dilla Hall, Ruth Walters.5th Row—Leta Clark, Lola Newberry, Othel Eaton, Maude Bratten. On the evening of the twenty-third of JMarch, Who Kissed Barbara waspresented. This play was in an unfinished condition in order that the membersmight discuss both its wealv and strong points. In spite of the fact that it was an unfinished product it was very good.IMuch credit for its excellence was due to the coaches Lola Newberry and JessieStewart. The play was a charming one act comedy the plot being very interesting. The cast was as follows: Barbara Faye Chambers Philip Bernard Lollar Elizabeth Andre Ross Elizabeths fiance August Meyer The Butler Edward Wilson

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, Synopses The Strut and Fret presented a two act comedy at the Normal Audi-torium January 24, 1922, for the Ijenefit of the athletic fund. The play was wellattended and reported quite a success. Cast of Characters ^latilda Deering, a rich spinster Velma Harrison Harold Deering, her nephew James Bennett Alice Deering, Harolds sister Ruth Lambert Archie Clark, a young lawyer Deneen Watson Bill AYorth, a man of all trades Othel Eaten Annie 0Shane, maid at the Dcerings iladeline Bradley Act I. Living room at the Deerings home, in a sulnirb of New York.Act n. The same, five minutes later.Time. An evening of the present.Coaches. Zoe Fullerton, Mary Conatser.Head Coach. Mae C. Trovillion. 157 m]\oi^ Cxclusibe Coursiesi ^uggegteb 1—Astronomy (a)—Two nights per week for 1st, 2d, and 3d years—Three nights per asusual for upperelassmen. Course consists of night study of stars and planetsfrom the window sills of the main building. Prerequisite—Campusology a. 2—Finance (a)—Offered eve

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Image from page 118 of “Old Boston taverns and tavern clubs” (1917)
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Identifier: oldbostontavernso00drak
Title: Old Boston taverns and tavern clubs
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Drake, Samuel Adams, 1833-1905 Watkins, Walter Kendall, 1855-1934
Subjects: Taverns (Inns) — Massachusetts Boston Clubs — Massachusetts Boston Boston (Mass.) — Social life and customs
Publisher: Boston, W. A. Butterfield
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ase, and inside isstill to be seen the cylindrical piece of iron which,when heated, kept the delectable liquid contents of theurn hot until imbibed by the frequenters of the tavern.The Green Dragon Tavern site, now occupied by abusiness structure, is OAvned by the St. Andrews Lodgeof Free Masons of Boston, and at a recent gathering ofthe Lodge on St. Andrews Day the urn was exhibitedto the assembled brethren. When the contents of the tavern were sold, the urnwas bought by Mrs. Elizabeth Harrington, who thenkept a famous boarding house on Pearl Street, in abuilding owned by the Q.uincy family. In 1847 thehouse was razed and replaced by the Quincy Block,and Mrs. Harrington removed to High Street andfrom there to Chauncey Place. Some of the prominentmen of Boston boarded with her for many years. Ather death the urn was given to her daughter, Mrs.John R. Bradford, and it has now been presented tothe Society by Miss Phebe C. Bradford of Boston,granddaughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Harrington. 88

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SCHOOU Q5.J^^^^^) ST JW2 6Jithcrtorx, ffoJUL^h, Q POP455OO n BQ <5 n« Mo O o w ID ID &J_ 0 o m aId M 02 a 0)(QID a. ID-»3« O ■oa J IDO o oo MEH <1 oo C5Z M o w OS +343 oQ CompUje.dL by Qeorqe, l,<xmo, tfi THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY A3TOR, LrrOXilLDilN FOUNDATIONS IX. THE HANCOCK TAVERN. As an old landmark the Hancock Tavern is a failure.There was not an old window in the house ; the nailswere Bridgewater nails, the timbers were mill-sawed,and the front of it was of face brick, which were notmade even in 1800. At the time of the Revolution itwas merely a four-room dwelling house of twelve win-dows, and the first license ever given to it as an innwas in 1790. The building recently demolished waserected during the years 1807 to 1812. With the above words, Edward W. McGlenen, cityregistrar, effectually settled the question June 3,1903, ata meeting of the New England Historic GenealogicalSociety, as to the widely credited report that it was inthe Hancock Tavern^ which fo

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Image from page 75 of “The birds of Washington : a complete, scientific and popular account of the 372 species of birds found in the state” (1909)
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Identifier: birdsofwashingto01daws
Title: The birds of Washington : a complete, scientific and popular account of the 372 species of birds found in the state
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Dawson, William Leon, 1873-1928 Bowles, John Hooper Brooks, Allan, 1869-1946
Subjects: Birds — Washington (State)
Publisher: Seattle : Occidental Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: American Museum of Natural History Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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ifty halj-its as their northernkinfolk. Food isne\-er refused, and awell – stuffed speci-men will still carr\grub from camp amisecrete it in bark-crevice iir hollow,against the unknownhour of need. I have never heard the Gray Jay titter more than a soft cooing 2vlicc ezv repeated at random;but Bendire credits it with a near approach to song: and Mrs. Bailey saysof the Jays on Mr. Hood^: Their notes were pleasantly varied. Onecall was remarkablv like the chirp of a robin. Another of the common-est was a weak and rather complaining cry repeated several times. Asharply contrasting one was a pure clear whistle of one note followedby a three-syllabled call something like Ka-wc-aJi. The regular rallyingcry was still dilTerent, a loud and striking two-syllaliled ka-iihcc. The eggs of the Gra\- Ja\ have not \ei been reported from this State,but it is known that the bird builds a very substantial nest of twigs, grasses,plant fibre, and mosses without mud. and that it provides a heavy lining of

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7-,7;,-,-i National Pari!. A B.XCHELORS PET. Photo by J. H. Boudcs. a. The Auk, Vol. III., 1886, p. 167. b. Life Histories of N. A. Birds, Vol. II., p. 394. c. Handbook Birds of the Western U. S., pp. 278-9. THE COWBIRD. 43 soft gray mosses for the eggs. The nest is usually well concealed in a firtree, and may be placed at any height from ten or fifteen feet upward, althousually at sixty or eighty feet. Only one brood is reared in a season, andfamily groups hunt trigether until late in the summer. No. 15. COWBIRD. A. O. U. Xo. 495. Molothrus ater (Bodd.). Synonyms.—Cow Blackbird. Cuckold. Description.—Adult male: Head and neck wood-, seal-, or coffee-brown(variable) : remaining plumage black with metallic greenish or bluish iridescence.Female: Dark grayish brown, showing slight greenish reflections, darkest onwings and tail, lightening on breast and throat. Young in first plumage: Likefemale but lighter below and more or less streaky; above somewhat mottled bybufty edgings of feat

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Image from page 333 of “The story of American heroism; thrilling narratives of personal adventures during the great Civil war, as told by the medal winners and roll of honor men” (1897)

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Image from page 333 of “The story of American heroism; thrilling narratives of personal adventures during the great Civil war, as told by the medal winners and roll of honor men” (1897)
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Identifier: storyofamericanh00wall
Title: The story of American heroism; thrilling narratives of personal adventures during the great Civil war, as told by the medal winners and roll of honor men
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Wallace, Lew, 1827-1905
Subjects: United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865 Personal narratives
Publisher: Springfield, O., J.W. Jones
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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gainst a treeon the side of a craggymountain in the hills of Penn-sylvania, nearly two thousandmiles from home, with deathstanding before me. Thereader can better imaginethan I can tell the feelings1 had. While in that conditiona straggling Federal soldierwalked up to me, looked at the stars on my collar, took ott my hat and putit on his own head, and said, Give me your arms. No, sir, I replied, I cant do that. He stepped back, raised his gun,and repeated, Give me your arms. I said, Why, my good fellow, are you a Federal soldier and dont kncnvthat you have not the right to disarm an officer? The honest soldier looked confused and said, What shall 1 do then witliyou? I told him that he ought to take me to an officer as nearly of my rankas might be. But, said he, you are not able to walk. I then told himhe ought to go and find some officer, and bring him to me. He went away, and in a little time returned to me with a gentlemanwho introduced himself as Colonel Rice of the 44th New York.*

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Passing the Canteen. ♦The writer jirobablj iilhuics to Colonel Etimund Ripe, lieutennnt-polonel of the Ilith Miissnchusetts Volunteers,who led his own regiment and the c»ne mentioned, the 44th New York, in tin- eluir^e nuule to close the Rap in theFederal lines, and repel Picketts assault. Colonel Kice won on that day a medal of honor, and fui-ther mention ofhim will be found in the following chapter. AMERICAN HEROISM. 317 After a few kind remarks, and expi-essing the hope that my hurt was notmortal. Colonel Rice said: Colonel, it becomes my duty to ask you for yourarms. I said, Certainly, sir. and handed him my sword and pistol,remarking to him that I had got but a short loan of that sword when the 14thAlabama captured it a few days previously from the lieutenant-colonel of the22nd ]\Iaine. and had given it to me two days before. Colonel Rice then directed the soldier who had brought him to me to goto the line and bring a litter, and meantime entertained me with kindconversation.

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Image from page 769 of “The new annual army list, militia list, and Indian civil service list” (1870)
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Identifier: newannualarmylis1875hart
Title: The new annual army list, militia list, and Indian civil service list
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Authors: Hart, H. G
Subjects: Great Britain. Army
Publisher: London : John Murray
Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland
Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland

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The Broadway, Ludgate. All communications respecting Advertisements must be forwardedto the contractor, Mr. GEO. PHILLIPS, Telegraph Chambers,Regent Circus, (326,) Oxford Street. MR. R. WILLSON,ARMY AND FINANCE AGENT, 33, St. Jamess Square, Pall Mall, London, S.W.Still acts as Private Agent to Officers at Home and A broad. Private Accounts kept. Widows Pensions, Retired, Full, and Half-Payreceived, and Remittances made with Correctness and Punctuality. Exchanges arranged, and Memorials, Petitions, &c, drafted. Passages, Outfits, Uniforms, Accoutrements, &c, procured, and Messes sup-plied with every Requisite. Money. — Mr. WlLLSON having taken up the subject of Finance, has special facili-ties for obtaining Cash on Personal and other Security, as well as on Mortgages,Reversions, Legacies, &c. Loans, in connexion with Life Assurances, at Five perCent. The Pecuniary Affairs of Officers and Private Gentlemen taken in hand, andIt](ir. tLt! confidentially arranged. C A RSO NS

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ORIGINAL Anti-Corrosion Paint, PATRONISED BY 3§cr ittajcsts the (Queen, anb 3g.^.3§. the ?tinxt of S&alcs. ^4«<a? 8000 a«<f upwards of the Nobility and Gentry. FOR EVERY DESCRIPTION OF OUT-DOOR WORK. IT IS ESPECIALLY APPLICABLE TO WOOD, IRON, BRICK, STONE, AND COMPO. CAN BE LAID ON BY UNSKILLED LABOUR.Two Cwt. Carriage Free to any Station in Great Britain or Ireland.Detailed Particulars, with Prices, Testimonials, and Pattern Cards, PostFree on application. PEEPAKED OIL-MIXTUEE FOE THE ANTI-COEEOSIOH. OILS, TURPENTINE, & BRUSHES. VARNISHES, both for outside and inside purposes. The Original Anti-Corrosion Paint is only to be obtained of WALTER CARSON & SONS, La Belle Sauuage Yard, Ludgate Hill, London, E.G., And 21, Batchelors Walk, Dublin. CA UTION. — All Casks bear the Trade Mark, or are not Genuine. Jn

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Image from web page 155 of “the truly amazing western: a vast kingdom. An extensive history of the trans-Mississippi states and regions. Containing step-by-step statistics alongside information in support of the action for deep harbors regarding Texas-Gulf coast /by F.

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Image from page 155 of “the fantastic western: a massive empire. An extensive history of the trans-Mississippi says and regions. Containing detailed data along with other information to get the activity for deep harbors from the Texas-Gulf coastline /by F.
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Identifier: greatwestvastemp01dana
Title: The great western: a huge empire. A comprehensive reputation for the trans-Mississippi says and territories. Containing detail by detail data alongside information meant for the action for deep harbors on Texas-Gulf coast /by F.L. Dana
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Writers: Dana, F. L
Subjects: United States, western — information and vacation Utah Description and travel Utah Record
Publisher: Denver, Colo: Great West Publishing Co, Excelsior Printing Co.
Contributing Library: Church Record Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Digitizing Sponsor: Corporation of the Presiding Bishop, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

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l be invested in Colorado. Every public enterprise that’s been done in Denver since1871, has received Colonel Spragues assistance. He had been one of theoriginal people in the Denver Chamber of Commerce, and of theReal Estate Exchange, both in businesses he is a valued member.he could be a thorough operator in real estate and is the owner of valuable propertyin Denver and for the condition. He’s got made a specialty of loan-ing cash, having control of large amounts of money of Denver and non-resident capitalists, besides their own big lot of money. Colonel Sprague had been active in getting for Denver its very first roll-ing mill, and was for some time president of that issue. He had been adelegate from the Real Estate Exchange towards the initial deep harbor con-vention, held at Fort Worth, Tx, in. July 1888, and subsequentlyto the Inter-State Deep Harbor Convention, held in Denver, Augustfollowing. Throughout enterprises impacting the passions of Colorado, wefind Col. Sprague an earnest worker and important recommend.

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IRA R. HOLMES,President Inter-State Town and Land Company, Denver, ColoradcSee Sketch on next page. I, R. HOLMES. THE portrait on the other side of the leaf is a life like engraving ofI. It. Holmes, President for the Inter-state Land and Town Com-pany. JIr. Holmes the most active and enterprising males inthe country, being among those indomitable spirits this one rinds onlyin the western. The business which he is the top is an incorpora-tion with a capital of ,000,000, the officers and leading stockholdersbeing, like Mr. Holmes, guys of push and power. The company tend to be large holders of real-estate in lots of associated with the west-ern says and territories, but currently they have been offering almost all of theirattention for their residential property in Ogden, Utah, which, after searching overthe entire industry, they have determined will be the fantastic town regarding the western. Obtained been successful in enabling suprisingly low rates to Ogden and return,and are running excursions there about every thirty days. Their particular initialtrip ended up being made o

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Image from web page 6 of “Ogden City Director” (1895)
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Identifier: ogdencitydirecto01unse
Title: Ogden City Director
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Writers:
Topics: Utah–Directories Utah–Weber–Directories Utah–Weber–Ogden–Directories
Publisher: Ogden, Utah Kansas City, Mo. Leo Haefeli and Frank J. Cannon R.L. Polk and Co.
Contributing Library: Church History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Digitizing Sponsor: Corporation of the Presiding Bishop, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

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Editor and Proprietor. A Semi-Weekly Peoples Celebration Report. The Ogden rtrTWN- 13 a» »we /**?percent T Advertise into the Evaluation should you want to cultivate the patronage ^ iWCVlCvV. of this professional. We are able to would you just as much great, rates UTAH. *-^^_ considered, as any report in Utah. The state Organ of thePopulist Party of Utah. Evaluation Publishing Company, Proprietors, 411 Twenty-Fourth Street. The only real Day Paper in Ogden. TL ¥^:i-T A r1«r^«*4ir> ^«< independent in Politics. Jltf 1)^ A^VCrtlSCr. The best marketing medium in Utah. __ Matt. E. Edsall, Publisher and Mgr. All of the finest commercial Art Printing is completed only at that office. 411 Twenty-Fourth. St. SILVER KING RESTAURANT. J. H. TRUSTY, PROP. DISHES SUPPORTED AT ALL HOURS. FINEST INTO THE CITY.FISH AND GAME IN SEASON. One Block From Union Depot, consume AS YOU WAIT. LOUIS J. BUCHER, Gontractor § Brick Manufacturer DEALER IX Mantels, Grates and Tiling, FIRE BRICK, FIRE CLAY AND PORTLANDCEMENT. Salesroom 2430 Qraiit .Ave. OGDEN, UTAH.

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ernest e. Stevens & organization, Fire, Lifeand Accident Insurance. WASHINGTON AVENUE. REAL ESTATE AND DEBTS. Law Reporter,Notary Public andTeacher of Shorthand and Typewriting;. GEO. GATRELL, STENOGRAPHER. oj([ General Copying. Workplace 41* Utah Loan and Trust Company Building, OGDEN TRANSFER BUSINESS. We move Pianos, Organs, Safes, Office Fixtures, home- p FORD management hold items. In addition store exact same. e» . … rN^i^. r>/kAl Give Full-weight so we Deliver COAL. Bottom Rates. FeSS^iST**- 373 Twenty-Fourth Street. THE BON-TON RESTAURANT HELPS OPEN THROUGH THE NIGHT. Additional Dinner on Sunday from 12 to 8 p. m., Including Wine, 25 cents.We Offer a Lunch from 12 until 4 oclock for 25 cents. Furnished Booms. Brief instructions after all Hours.Fresh Oysters and all forms of Eastern Fish in Season. TON & JIM, Supervisors. 252 Twenty-fifth St., Ogden, Utah. Roentgen L. POLK & COS OGDEN CITY DIRECTORS / 1895-6. EMBRACING A COMPLETE ALPHABETICAL RANGE OF BUSINESS FIRMS AND PRIVATECITIZENS; A CLASSIFIED LIST OF each TRA

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Image from page 10 of “Polk’s Indianapolis (Marion County, Ind.) city directory site, 1883” (1883)
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Identifier: polksindianapoli1883unse
Title: Polk’s Indianapolis (Marion County, Ind.) town directory, 1883
12 Months: 1883 (1880s)
Authors:
Topics: Indianapolis, Ind. Business businesses Residential streets Official residences People Government facilities Churches Schools Streets Cities
Publisher: R.L. Polk
Adding Library: Indianapolis City Directory Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS People and Sloan Foundation

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lCemeteries for this and adjoining States. I actually do not only profess, butpractice creativity in design. PLEASE GIVE ME A CALL, FACE-TO-FACE otherwise BY MAIL. Yours Respectfully, W. C. WHITEHEAD, 161 Massachusetts Ave. J. E. Shover. W. F. Christian. SHOYER & CHRISTIAN, CONTRACTORS The BUILDERS Architects and Superintendents. HOUSE, SIGN AND DECORATIVE PAINTERS. MIRRORS, FRENCH PLATE, PIECE, CUT, EM-BOSSED AND CATHEDRAL GLASS. HAMMERED and RIBBED GLASS fop SKYLIGHTS. 124 East Vermont Street, Phone. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. u< 1867. 1883, C.E. COFFIN & CO., REALESTATE HOME MORTGAGES, ^fcFIRE INSURANCE,*^ * No. 90 East Market St., Have constantly on hand, obtainable or trade, a sizable set of HOUSES AND LOTS, BUILDING PLENTY, FARMS AMD LANDS. ITMORTGAGE EOANS NEGOTIATED AND FIRE INSURANCE WRITTEN ON EOWEST COSTS. Particular interest provided to the collection of rents, pay-ment of taxes and care of city property and farms. Reference the banking institutions and company males usually of Indianapolis* MONUMENTS!

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Importer of Scotch Granite, -MANUFACTURER OF — ITALIAN and AMERICAN MARBLE MONUMENTS, TABLETS, etcetera. New Resigns Continuously Executed by the Many Ex-perienced Designers. No. 70 East Market Street, Opposite Postoffice. X1TI5IAXTAFOI.IS, ZND, 10 MINNESOTA CHIEF SEPARATOR.

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Image from page 44 of “Africa and its own residents” (1899)

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Identifier: africaitsinhabit02recl
Title: Africa and its inhabitants
12 Months: 1899 (1890s)
Writers: Reclus, Elisée, 1830-1905 Keane, A. H. (Augustus Henry), 1833-1912
Subjects: Ethnology
Publisher: London : J.S. Virtue
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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centuries created by the emigrants and people engagedin the whale fisheries. Thousands have previously checked out Portugal, Brazil, theWest Indies, the Sandwich isles, in addition to Arctic Seas, with no various other insularpopulation most likely includes therefore big a proportion of men that have made the I>:nABITANTS OF THIS AZOEES. 31 trip of the world. Amongst the rural courses wedding is almost constantly an affairof pure convenience and interest. Various traces however survive associated with the formerseclusion of the ladies, noticeable in building for the houses and especiallvin the outfit. Enveloped in their large hooded cloaks, the Azorian ladies seemto flit about like phantoms. Several hoods are still so contrived concerning meetin front side, making just a narrow orifice when it comes to wearer ^nth which to see withoutbeing seen. Within the district of San Miguel the partner, whenever spending a call or goingto size, may not go by the part of the woman husband, just who struts majestically a few Fijj. 12.—WoiiEx OP Deadly axd Sax-Miguzl. S-W-jJ.JV .J

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paces in front. Formerly the ladies in the towns cannot even go overseas tomake their expenditures, but had to do-all their particular shopping home, never leaving thefemale flats except to consult with the church. At approach of a man it waseven etiquette to show to the wall surface to prevent a profane glance. The people increases quickly by all-natural more than births throughout the mortality,families being extremely nimierous, plus the death-rate amongst young ones relativelyextremely low. In addition the survival also of weaker offspring tendsapparently to result in a general degradation associated with the race, and men are no 32 ^EST AFRICA. I longer noticed in the archipelago at all comparable to the durable peasantry of NorthPortugal. Epidemics sporadically break out, as well as the old chroniclers speak of pestilence, which in combo aided by the Moorish corsairs laid waste the risingsettlements. At the moment gastric and tj-phoid fevers are endemic, although theirnridencc is much diminished by the topogr

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Image from web page 206 of “United states ornithology when it comes to home and college” (1901)
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Identifier: americanornithol11901reed
Title: United States ornithology the house and school
12 Months: 1901 (1900s)
Writers: Reed, Chester A. (Chester Albert), 1876-1912
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: Worcester, Mass. : C.K. Reed
Adding Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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■a-u-ii-u-a-<»-a-u-cA-i*-u-{*-a-< ci=»ncH<Ci»ciHHcincnnn=j3B=- Vol. I. September, IDOl. JVo, 9 UNITED STATES OSTRICH FARMS. one thousand Os- Nearly triches, the descendents ofAfrican imports, are vege-tating in CaHfornia and Ar-izona only at that writing. Apair of the animals havebeen known in Californiato hatch thirty-seven chicksin 12 months; a brief reflec-tion upon these numbers with-out a vibrant imagination willin a rather limited time showlarge potential profits inthe culture regarding the AmericanOstrich; experience, thebest instructor, shows thatthis price cannot by anymeans be depended upon,but that various localitieseven in the same districtaffect very seriously thehealth of this strange spec-imen of bird creation.Cold winds and wantof green meals are often fatalto the Ostrich youthful; eventhe embryo is not free of

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the CORRESPONDENT. i6o UNITED STATES ORNITHOLOGY. threat of destruction by the moms and dad, either caused by fright on component ofthe hen Ostrich, causing breaking the eggs within the nest, or bythe irregular desire for food of the male, that will in many cases get a habitof consuming the fresh laid eggs of their companion. The Ostrich business has al-ready gained proportions of adequate dimensions to interest money; and todaynot just one Ostrich are available for love or cash uncontrolled by thecompetitive demand with this Ostrich trust. For purposes of income mostof the Ostrich facilities of America are influenced by the item of interestwhich these odd bipeds tend to be on tourists from north; whom annual-ly visitthe warmer climates with this nation, in which just can the AfricanOstrich thrive. Events are constructed of the birds at Northern expositions,but these exhibits tend to be in no way Ostrich facilities inside true feeling of that

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Image from page 100 of “Poly, The” (1916)

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Identifier: polythe1916bill
Title: Poly, The
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Billings Polytechnic Institute
Subjects: RMC yearbooks yearbooks Rocky Mountain College History Billings Polytechnic History
Publisher: Billings Polytechnic Institute
Contributing Library: Rocky Mountain College, Paul M. Adams Memorial Library, Heritage Archives
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Glenn Harvey Smith. He left his as-sociations here for that other life when such a bright future seemed justahead, yet we know that some day the mystery will be solved. Till thenwe will revere his memory and respect the fine things he stood for. Empress Brand STEEL CUT COFFEE For Sale by all First ClassGrocers Everywhere Roasted and Packed by Stone-Ordean-Wells Co. Mortgage Loans on Im-proved Real Estate Montana MortgageCompany Selvidge- Babcocfy BuildingPhone 1317 —98— Perkins-Savage Lumber Co. BILLINGS, MONTANA DEALERS IN LUMBER ANDBUILDING MATERIAL We offer to the public the highest grade material atthe lowest possible price consistent with good business. Our Motto Is: Good Goods at Right Prices WE SATISFY PHONE 1051 We have for sale the best Upland in Montana to If you are looking for a loca-tion for a suburban home, wehave the best. W. B. GEORGELAND CO. Push The Button and follow instructions: You willget as good results as the professionalphotographer, with The Ansco

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There isno guess-work. Theprice is low.The Anscolasts foryears. WE DOYOUR DEVELOPING, Quickly, Accur-ately and at a Moderate Price. LEE WARREN, 2703 Montana Ave.RED CROSS DRUG STORE At 106 Broadway -99- You Can Get It atChappies DRUGS Sationery, Kodaksand Supplies Kodak Finishing andSupplies Chappie Drug Co. BILLINGS, MONT. A mencan Bank & TrustCompany CAPITAL, 0,000.00 AdiveAlert Alive W. LEE MAINS. PresidentCHAS. SPEAR, Vice PresidentO. W. ALLEN, CashierJOS. L. McCLELLAN, Asst. Cash. For The BEST in Real Estate,Loans and Abstracting ofTitles—see YellowstoneInvestment Co. J. L. ALFORD, Mgr.7 Broadway Hail! Hail! The Gang Comes Here! MetropolitanBarber Shop 7 CHAIRS 7 * There Is a Reason * ROTHROCK & KOLB McNutts Grocery Good Things to Eatfor Quality Your Satisfaction means our SuccessBoth Phones R. J. McNUTT, Jr., PROPRIETOR —100- Hart-AlbinCo. Montanas Greatest Dry Goods Store Founded 1902 AT Your Service When in the market for HARDWAREFURNACESPAINTSSTOVESRANGESROOFIN

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Image from page 372 of “Hawaii and its people; the land of rainbow and palm” (1899)
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Identifier: hawaiiitspeoplel00twom
Title: Hawaii and its people; the land of rainbow and palm
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Twombly, Alexander S. (Alexander Stevenson), 1832-1907
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Boston [etc.] Silver, Burdett
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University Hawaii, Joseph F. Smith Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Consortium of Church Libraries and Archives

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se Min-ister at Washington also formally protested against thetreaty. The same month, June, 1897, Hon. Harold M.Sewall arrived at Honolulu as United States Minister,to succeed Minister Willis, who had died in office.During the month of January, 1898, President Dolewas in Washington in the interests of annexation, andMr. J. O. Carter, the ex-queens friend and adviser, alsowent to the capital to oppose the treaty. The ex-queenhad already heavily mortgaged her private estate, toresist, by all means in her power, the resistless sweepof manifest destiny, soon to become apparent in thestartling events of this memorable year. Quite different was the conduct of the Princess Kaiu-lani, the ex-heir apparent to the throne of Hawaii, whohad returned to Honolulu in October of the year 1897.Her birthday reception, a week later, was attended notonly by the leading natives, but also by society in gen-eral, including even those who had been parties to the ANNEXATION OF HAWAII TO THE UNITED STATES. 369

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PRINCESS KAIULANl 370 ANNEXATION OF HAWAII TO THE UNITED STATES. destruction of her royal prospects. She received themall courteously, and from that time became one of theleading young ladies in social and philanthropic circles.By her charming manners and lovely disposition shewon golden opinions of all. She was always a favoritein the islands. After the republic of Hawaii was estab-lished, she never again lent her name to any discussionof the politics of her country. But alas! to the great sorrow of all who knew her,she died in Honolulu March 6, 1899, and received thehonors due to her rank and virtues in one of the mostimposing funeral pageants ever seen in Hawaii. Twohundred and fifty natives drew the funeral car to theMausoleum where Hawaiian kings and queens repose inpeace. It has already been stated that the war of 1898 betweenthe United States and Spain hastened the annexation ofHawaii to our republic. The relations of the United States with Spain, in re-gard to Cuba, had been f

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Image from page 142 of “Hill’s album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches of many persons who have been and are prominent as religionists, military heroes, inventors, financiers, scientists, explorers, writers, physicians, actors,

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Image from page 142 of “Hill’s album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches of many persons who have been and are prominent as religionists, military heroes, inventors, financiers, scientists, explorers, writers, physicians, actors,
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Identifier: hillsalbumofbiog00hill
Title: Hill’s album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches of many persons who have been and are prominent as religionists, military heroes, inventors, financiers, scientists, explorers, writers, physicians, actors, lawyers, musicians, artists, poets, sovereigns, humorists, orators and statesmen, together with chapters relating to history, science, and important work in which prominent people have been engaged at various periods of time
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Hill, Thomas E. (Thomas Edie), 1832-1915
Subjects: Biography Encyclopedias and dictionaries
Publisher: Chicago : Hill Standard Book Co.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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was born at Groton.Mass., 1792, and was for many years asso-ciated in business with his brother Amos.In the latter part of his life Abbott wasengaged largely in the China trade. In1834 he was elected to Congress, wherehe served on the committee on ways anilnu-jins; subsequently he was one of the Government Northwesternboundary commission. In 1849 President Taylor offered him a seatin his cabinet; but Mr. Lawrence declined and accepted the postof Minister to Great Britain. Was recalled, however, at his ownrequest, in 18.53. The remainder of his life he devoted to privatebusiness, his fortune becoming very large. To Harvard College hegave ,000 to establish a scientific school, which bears his name,and left ,000 more to establish model lodging-houses. Hidiedat Boston, in 1H55. In the careers of both these gentlemen was manifested the trueNew England character f(tr business energy and integrity, producingtill- ii>iuil r>iilt—livr- iif jirii-perity juid di»Jtinrii.in BARNUM.

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The Experience and Testimony of Successful Men. A B C of Success. ATTEND carefully to details of your business.Be prompt in all things.Consider well, —then decide.Dare to do right. Fear to do wrong.Endure trials patiently.Fight lifes battle bravely, manfully.(Jo not in the society of the vicious.Hold integrity sacred. Injure not anothers reputation or business.Join hands only with the virtuous.Keep your mind from evil thoughts.Lie not for any consideration.Make few acquaintances.Never trj to appear what you are not.Oppose not in spit* or malice.Pay your debts promptly.Question not the veracity of a friend.Respect the counsel of your parents.Sacrifice money rather than principle.Touch not, taste not, handle not intoxicatingdrinks.Use your leisure time for improvement.Venture not upon the threshold of wrong.AVatch carefully over your passions.Xtend to every one a kindly salutation.Yield not to discouragements.Zealously labor for the right.& success is certain. You Will Not be Sorr

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Image from page 491 of “Heads of the people, or, Portraits of the English” (1864)
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Identifier: headsofpeopleorp02mead
Title: Heads of the people, or, Portraits of the English
Year: 1864 (1860s)
Authors: Meadows, Joseph Kenny, 1790-1874
Subjects:
Publisher: London : Henry G. Bohn
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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bours, but that all under-sheriffs,and all officers of and belonging to a Sheriff, are so remarkable forsuperhuman activic^ and alertness. But now his responsibilitiesare increased to an unprecedented degree of difficulty and danger.To stand actions for false arrest, or to be fixed with debt and costs bya rascally ruler who passes the boundary line and forgets to return,was bad enough ; but to have the law of arrest, in its most per-emptory form, turned against himself is worse than bad, and not tobe atoned for by the pleasure of labouring night and day for thepublic; and the distinction of parading a superb, but costly equipage,with the privilege of dining half London and Middlesex ** regardlessof expense. THE CITY PLEADER. The City Pleader is well-skilled in the law and gastronomy of hiscountry. His opinions are sound, his appetite excellent, and hisdigestion easy. He would elsewhere be called the standing counsel;but a protracted stay at table iu the civic regions, renders it expe-

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THE CITY PLEADER. Nor e er looks forward further than hia nose,

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Image from page 920 of “Our western empire, or, The new West beyond the Mississippi : the latest and most comprehensive work on the states and territories west of the Mississippi : containing the fullest and most complete description, from official and ot
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Identifier: ourwesternempire1881broc
Title: Our western empire, or, The new West beyond the Mississippi : the latest and most comprehensive work on the states and territories west of the Mississippi : containing the fullest and most complete description, from official and other authentic sources, of the geography, geology and natural history (with abundant incidents and adventures), the climates, soil, agriculture, the mineral and mining products, the crops, and herds and flocks, the social condition, educational and religious progress, and future prospects of the whole region lying between the Mississippi and Pacific Ocean : to which is added the various routines, and prices of passage and transportation for emigrants thither, the laws, regulations and provisions for obtaining lands from the national or state government of railroads, counsel as to locations and procuring lands, crops most profitable for culture, mining operations, and the lastest processes for the reduction of gold and silver, the exercise of trades or professions, and detailed descriptions of each state ad territory, with full information concerning Manitoba, British Columbia, and those regions in the Atlantic States adapted to settlement, by those who do not wish to go west, and statistics of crops, areas, rainfall, etc.
Year: 1881 (1880s)
Authors: Brockett, L. P. (Linus Pierpont), 1820-1893
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : Bradley, Garretson & Co. Columbus, O. : W. Garretson & Co.
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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e fish of Kansas are several species of perch,sunfish, catfish, roach, black bass, one or two species of trout, etc.Shad, salmon, salmon trout, grayling, an eastern species of blackbass, etc., have been introduced through the Fish Commission,but the success of these introductions is not yet fully demon-strated. The reptiles are much the same as those of Arkansasand Missouri. Nahiral Curiosities and Phenomena.—In a prairie State likeKansas there are comparatively few of these. The most re-markable are the Monument Rocks in Gove county, the PulpitRock in Ellsworth county, the Rock City, and the PerforatedRock near by, in Ottawa county, the Table Rock in Lincolncounty, and the masses of gypsum and selenite in the gypsumbeds. Some of the fossil bones of vertebrates in the tertiary hadbeen so thoroughly slllcified as to be converted Into moss agatesof great beauty. This is particularly the case In Wallace andSheridan counties. The moss agates of that region, not fossils,are very perfect.

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^K^^ RUSSIAN VILLAGE. KANSAS—A DUG-OUT—HAYlNc; CLIMATE OF KANSAS. 86? Clijnate and Meteoj^ology.—No State in the Union, certainlynone in Our Western Empire, has been so thorough in record-ing its climatic changes as Kansas. This has been due largely,indeed almost entirely, to the persistent and untiring efforts ofthe excellent Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture, thelate Hon. Alfred Gray, to whom not only the State but agricul-turists and scientists everywhere owe a debt of gratitude whichcan never be fully repaid. His admirable reports, prepared withso much labor and with such accuracy and completeness amidgreat bodily suffering and wasting disease, attest alike his philan-thropy and his devotion to his work. We may say in generalthat the climate of Kansas is a very desirable one. The summermonths are in most parts of the State rather hot, the averagemean temperature being for June about 75°, for July about 84.5°,and for August about 77.5°. The extremes of the winter

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Image from page 135 of “The blue and white [serial]” (1922)

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Image from page 135 of “The blue and white [serial]” (1922)
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Identifier: bluewhiteserial13ashe
Title: The blue and white [serial]
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Asheville School (Asheville, N.C.)
Subjects: Asheville School (Asheville, N.C.) Private schools School yearbooks
Publisher: Asheville, N.C. : The Senior Class
Contributing Library: University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

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any Hormiguero Central Corporation Central Patricio Punta Alegre Sugar Company Central San Ramon San Agustin Sugar Company Central Senado Soledad Sugar Company Cuban Canadian Sugar Company Trinidad Sugar Company Florida Sugar Company EUROPEAN REPRESENTATIVE: EDWARD GREY & COMPANY LIVERPOOL BOSTON NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA 10 Broad Street 111 West Street 135 South Second Street » » » » » • * • • • • • • • • ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ «• >- ♦ v y ftft ❖t Y T . T f y * y y I ft ft 4 y y X At your service with closed or open cars at all hours $ y I y y y y y 4 I ft Y J I ft y $ y y ft y ft $ I J. L. RARDEN I y ? y y ? Wo/ « Minute Late Auto Service % ft y y y y t y t y t y t y y y y y y Y Y T Y ft t Y Y y y y t y t Y Have Your Parents Use Our Cars •§ ft , Y When in Town Y Y | y ?I YYYYYfY?Y ftI £ Asheville, N. C X*t yyyyy Telephone 431 2 N. Market St. X Y y ftY yyvyyy Yft ROBERT E. McKEE General ContractorConstruction Engineer 1900-1932 Texas St.El PasoTexas

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+—. . + Compliments ofthe GLASS OF 1925 +-———• i Exclusive Ready-to-Wear for Men, Womenand Children Mens and Young Mens Lounging and Dress Clothes,Furnishings and Haberdashery of the Better Kind. Golf and Hunting Togs, Hiking and Camping Clothes,Sweaters, Shoes, etc. Fishin tackle thats fit for fishin. Complete lines ofBaseball, Football, and Tennis Goods. 11 Patton Avenue Asheville, N. C. George W. Langford Company General Contractors MAIN OFFICE AT Louisville, Kentucky In the financing and erecting of office buildings,hotels and other sound building propositions _ourfinancial connections make it possible to be ofconsiderable service to owners by taking bonds inpayment of a large part of the contract price. Ourconstruction organization is unexcelled CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED Compliments ofGEO. B. MATTHEWS & SONSNew Orleans, La. LACKNER, BUTZ & Company Mortgage Investments Bank Floor, Conway Building111 W. Washington St.Chicago Illinois Municipal Bonds ARE TOTALLY FRE

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Image from page 374 of “City documents. Municipal register, mayor’s address, annual reports, etc” (1894)
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Identifier: citydocumentsmun1918newb
Title: City documents. Municipal register, mayor’s address, annual reports, etc
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: New Bedford (Mass.)
Subjects: New Bedford (Mass.) — Politics and government
Publisher: New Bedford, The City, Printed by the Baker Mfg. Co
Contributing Library: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Digitizing Sponsor: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

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pig PARK DEPARTMENT FINANCIAL REPORT New Bedford, Mass. December 1, 1918. To the Board of Park Commissioners : The Twenty-fifth Annual Financial Report ofthe receipts and expenditures of the department ofparks, for the year ending November 30, 1918, whichI have the honor to submit contains in detail, inform-ation regarding the finances of the department in-cluding the receipts, expenses, and disbursements ofthe Park Commission, and affords in this summary,which is given herewith, an opportunity for thosewho are interested in parks, and their managementand maintenance, a correct explanation of all moneysprovided by the taxpayers for the past year, and thesame is hereby submitted to our citizens for their con-sideration.

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P20 PARK DEPARTMENT Financial Statement for the Year Buttonwood Park ,902.42 Hazelwood Park 2,792.13 Brooklawn Park 7,785.13 Triangle Park 50.00 Common 7,847.37 Office 4,857.18 Ashley Park 1G0.80 Bridge Approach 1,112.68 Grove Park 2,482.82 Balance on hand 9.47 Transferred to unappropriated Funds (see City Auditors Balance 718.80 ,718.80 Receipts Appropriation ,000.00 Sale of milk 112.59 Rent, (cafe privileges) 150.00 Sale of Vegetables 376.21 Sale of wood 80.00 ;718.80 Office Expenses and MiscellaneousExpenditures Superintendent and Clerk ,369.73 Telephone 124.17 Supplies 119.44 Auto Rent, repairs, gasoline, etc 553.08 Printing 60.45 Annual Report 124.00 Traveling Expenses 345.51 Painting Office 55.07 Miscellaneous 105.73 ,847.18

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Image from page 115 of “Agriculture; a text for the school and the farm” (1921)

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Image from page 115 of “Agriculture; a text for the school and the farm” (1921)
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Identifier: agriculturetextf00bens
Title: Agriculture; a text for the school and the farm
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Benson, Oscar Herman, 1875-1951. [from old catalog] Betts, George Herbert, 1868-1934, [from old catalog] joint author
Subjects: Agriculture
Publisher: Indianapolis, The Bobbs-Merrill company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ecipes. 4. In the field demonstrate the proper method of seed-ing and, when equipment is available, the methods of pre-paring seed bed, disking, fertilizing, etc. 5. Demonstrate how to select individual wheat and oatheads for seed. 6. Wheat and Oat Play Contests Plan and carry out the following contest games: 1. Variety naming contest. 2. Wheat and oat judging contest. 3. Recipe giving contest. 4. Bread baking contest. 5. Oral descriptions by class members of a thrashingday at home. 7. Wheat or Oat Club Project A wheat or oat club makes an interesting method ofstudying the economic production of these cereals. Themembers of the club should arrange to grow from one tofive acres, studying carefully the system of follow-upinstruction provided by the managers of such clubs in yourcounty and state, and keeping a complete record of all ob-servations, receipts and expenditures. The girls can grow a small plat, say one square rod,with a view to studying the life history of the plant, its cul-

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A club girl witli lier baking of bread. OATS 97 tural methods, and its use for food products. In connectionwith domestic-science work, the girls can prepare for ex-hibit purposes the various dishes possible from the oat andbake a loaf of wheat bread for the school exhibit eachmonth. This makes an interesting demonstration for Fri-day afternoon programs. For a basis of award in prize contests or for credit rat-ings on home projects and the club work, we suggest thatyou secure recommendations of your Supervisor of Agri-cultural and Flome Economic Education in your state, andalso get help from your State Leader of Boys and GirlsExtension Work. In the absence of their aid, the followingwill be helpful: Home and Club Project Score Card 1. Yield and quality of produclion 30 2. Net profit on investment 30 3. Exhibit of grain and materials 20 4. Crop records and story of work 20 Total score, if perfect 100 Suggestions Have members of the class outline a set of ten demon-strations with oats, f

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Image from page 241 of “North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]” (1894)
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Identifier: northcarolinachr6612unit
Title: North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference
Subjects: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference Methodist Church
Publisher: Greensboro, N.C., Methodist Board of Publication, [etc.]
Contributing Library: Duke Divinity School Library, Duke University
Digitizing Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to Duke University for the Religion in North Carolina project.

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ake nutand fruit bonbons—the business will netyou to 0 per month. You canwork from your own home; all who sam-ple your bonbons become regular custom-ers. You start by investing less than for supplies. Mary Elizabeth startedher candy kitchen with .00 and hasmade a fortune. Cannot you do like-wise? I will tell you all about the busi-ness and help you start, so you can be-come independent. Now is the psycho-logical time to make big money, as sugaris cheaper and fine bonbons commandphenomenal prices. Write today. IsabellaInez. 322 Morewood Building, Pittsburgh,Pa. TEN-POINT STANDARD CREDIT SYS-TEM FOR SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASSES Use has proved its value. Develops thescholars. Aids the teachers. The indi-vidual has first place. Effort is stimu-lated. Card for each class member. Dif-ferent from other systems. Splendidsystem. Most complete. 100 cards,.50; 1,000 cards, .50; 12 cards for 25c.Sample cards, 5c. Published exclusivelyby Geo. W. Morse, 12 N. Cooke St., Ports-mouth. Va.

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Strengthen Your Position You who are at the top of theladder may come tumbling down ifyour investments suddenly turnedou . worthless. Prevent any such occurrence byputting your money into safe,sound, interest paying bonds. Alamance First Mortgage 6 percent Gold Bonds are backed bybig surplus, a reliable company andfully secured by first mortgages. You should know more aboutthem. Write, call or phone to nearestoffice for free booklet, entitledBonds. Some of the testimonyit contains may be from one ofyour friends. Investigate Before Investing Alamance Insurance &Real Estate Co. W. E. Sharpe, Mgr.BURLINGTON, N. C. Branches: Raleigh, Durham, Reids-vllle, Fayettevllle, Asheboro. We Offer During The Month ofApril Up to the amount of stock on hand, to any church or congregationin North Carolina, a first quality guaranteed pure Linseed Oil andLead Paint, whos covering capacity is 300 to 350 sq. ft. two coats,according to surface. The Paint sells for .00 per gallon. For themonth of April

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Image from page 102 of “Buena Vista College bulletin” (1900)
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Identifier: buenavistaco0708buen
Title: Buena Vista College bulletin
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Buena Vista College
Subjects: Buena Vista College Buena Vista College Universities and colleges
Publisher: Storm Lake, Iowa : Buena Vista College
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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BANKING OUR course in banking is notonly intended to be of practi-cal assistance to young peopledesiring bank employment, but to beof practical benefit to every youngman and young woman as well as toqualify the student for a generalbusiness career. We do not limitour instruction to the mere handlingof a cash account. It includes thestudy of forms and the use of checks,notes, drafts, collections, discounts,exchanges and the various forms ofbanking, including bonds, loans,letters of credit and negotiable in-struments. Our instruction is de-signed to give the student an intelli-gent and clear understanding of themanagement of a bank account. Weaim to develop the highest businesscapacity in every student, so thatthey will be able to cope with theproblems of any business enterprise.

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OFFICE METHODS THE crowning feature of a courseat this institution is the prac-tical instruction in the use ofoffice appliances, conveniences andmethods, including general officetraining. This part of the work isthe exact duplication of conditions,as obtained in the most improved,up-to-date and progressive businessoffices. The true working spirit ofthis, however, can be best apprecia-ted by the fact that our graduatesare able to adapt themselves to theconditions of any business office assoon as they accept a position. Thispractical course of instruction hasbeen the means of securing for ourgraduates many high grade positionsthat they would not have been ableto secure had it not been for ourpractical method of imparting thisknowledge, including filing letters,card index systems, letter copying,etc. I m POSITIONS WE not only give you a practi-cal business and shorthandeducation, but will do ourutmost to assist you to a profitableposition. Your opportunity for secur-ing employment after

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