Image from page 224 of “[Course catalog]” (1909)

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Image from page 224 of “[Course catalog]” (1909)
credit counseling
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Identifier: coursecatalog7475nort
Title: [Course catalog]
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Northeastern University (Boston, Mass.) Boston Young Men’s Christian Association Northeastern University Preparatory School (Boston, Mass.) Huntington School for Boys (Boston, Mass.)
Subjects: Northeastern University (Boston, Mass.) Universities and colleges
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : Northeastern University
Contributing Library: Northeastern University, Snell Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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Porter, M.Ed. William F. Brady, Jr., B.S. Coordinator of Graduate Coop- Educational Placement erative Education Officer Kenneth E. Schongold, B.S. Francis L. Heuston, M.Ed. Graduate and ProfessionalSchool Counselor Thomas J. McEneaney, M.Ed. Counseling and placement services are available to seniors andalumni of all of the programs offered by Northeastern University.Through this department, representatives of hundreds of compa-nies are scheduled to visit the campus each year for the specificpurpose of interviewing seniors for employment after graduation.Lists of job opportunities are maintained for seniors and alumniseeking openings for which they may be qualified. The Department of Graduate Placement Services is also respon-sible for the referral of graduate students enrolled in programsoperated on the Cooperative Plan to assignments designed tosupplement classroom work. It also supplies counseling informa-tion to students who wish to continue their education at the gradu-ate level.

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The Center forCooperative Education DirectorFACULTY Paul E. Dube, M.A., M.Ed. Project Coordinator Stephanie D. Urban, B.A. Overseas Placement Director Donald R. Allen, Ph.D. 224 / Cooperative Education Assistant Director andDirector of Training Rhona E. Wolfe, M.Ed. Training Assistant Barbara J. Reid, B.A. Educational institutions and other organizations exploring, devel-oping, expanding, or improving programs in cooperative educa-tion contact the Center for a variety of services. All facets of theestablishment, operation, and expansion of programs may be ex-plored with professional consultants familiar with all aspects ofcooperative education. Intensive short-term training workshops for both new and ex-perienced coordinators of cooperative programs and the four-week Summer Institute in Cooperative Education offering eightquarter hours of credit are among the services offered by theCenter. The CooperativeEducation ResearchCenter FACULTY Director James W. Wilson, Ph.D., Professor of Co

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Image from page 158 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
credit counseling
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Identifier: bellvol24telephonemag00amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: BayNet

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is fine record have every faith and confidence that, will be maintained. Whos Who & Whats Whatin This Issue The willing, courteous, and effective as-sistance of many members of the Army andNavy, of all ranks, is evident in the sec-tion of this issue dealing with ElectricalCommunications in IVorld-ivide Warfare.Without their aid and counsel the neces-sary information could not have been com-piled nor the photographs obtained. Andsince it is not practicable to make acknowl-edgment here to so many individuals, theeditors express in this fashion their sincere thanks and appreciation to all those in theServices whose help has made possible sounusual a feature in these pages. Neither is it feasible to give credits in-dividually for so many photographs. Theywere secured—with a few exceptions—from the Armys Bureau of Public Rela-tions, the Signal Corps, the Army AirForces, the Navy, the Marine Corps, andthe Coast Guard. They give abundant evi-dence of the splendid work of the Services

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James J. Pilliou Harold L. Ryan George H. Jess 132 Bell Telephone Magazine photographic sections in making a pictorialrecord of every aspect of this war. It is a startling picture of long distanceservice in the not too remote future whichJames J. Pilliod and Harold L. Ryanpaint. As assistant chief engineer, and as-sistant vice president in charge of the traf-fic division, respectively, of the A, T. & T.Companys Department of Operation andEngineering, they are in key positions todiscuss the equipment and methods whichwill make operator toll dialing possible ona nation-wide basis, and the improvementsin service which will come with it. Starting with the Long Lines Depart-ment in 1908, Mr. Pilliod had become by1914 its division plant engineer in Chi-cago. In New York since 1918, he hadbeen successively the Departments engineerof transmission, engineer, and general man-age before transferring to his present post in 1943. Mr. Ryans Bell System career,entirely devoted to work in traffic

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Image from page 160 of “Washington (District of Columbia), city directory” (1921)
credit counseling
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Identifier: washingtondistri00unse
Title: Washington (District of Columbia), city directory
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Polk
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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s, Suits Overcoats and Coats MERCANTILE AGENCIES JOS. P. CUIiliEN L.EO B. ABERNETHV MARTIN J. McNAMARA Pre*—Gen I. Mgr. V. Pres.-Asst. Mgr. Counsel Established 11)11 ^^^^^^ Incorporated 1918 EFFICIENT CULLED crl> SERVICE PROMPT 1416 F STREET N. W. ^ KELLOGG BUILDING CONFIDENTIAL AGENTS A Service on Credit Reports, Colled ions and Investigating Employees Unequaled. Phone Main 7043—youll be convinced. Reference—Any Bank, Newspaper and First-Class Merchant or Professional Man. METAL CEILINGS Estimates Cheerfully Given Erecting by Experts THOS. E. ALLISON Metal Ceiling and Metal Sidewall Contractor All Work Positively Guaranteed19 Years Experience 640 and 642 Penna. Avenue S. E. Phone Lincoln 2649 (1921) BOYDS DIRECTORY OF TH 180 MIMEOGRAPHING PHONE FRANKLIN 1888 Commercial Office Service A PROVEN SERVICE ENTIRE FIRST FLOOR, BALTIC BUILDING606 F STREET MIMEOGRAPHING MULTIGRAPHING TYPEWRITING ADDRESSOGRAPHING STENOGRAPHING PRINTING FOLDING MAILING MONUMENTS TELEPHONE FRANKLIN 6949

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ESTABLISHED 1885 Monuments THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF FINISHED MONUMENTS ONDISPLAY FROM WHICH TO SELECT. YOUR INSPECTION IS INVITED. BUYING MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS FROM PHOTO-GRAPHS OR DESIGNS OFTEN RESULT IN DISAPPOINTMENT. MAKEYOUR SELECTION NOW OF A FINISHED MONUMENT FOR IMMEDI-ATE OR FUTURE DELIVERY. PHILIP SMITH OFFICE, WORKS, DISPLAY YARD: FIRST AND B STREETS S. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. m MfnuiFuni«.,m WM m ■fl m t mm > mm | DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (1921)

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A 5-Step Course to an Impressive Credit Score

A 5-Step Course to an Impressive Credit Score

The journey to an impressive credit score begins with a resolution: The need for a change and to re-establish a good report with reporting bureaus. The steps explained in this piece are meant to be guides for improving your rating. You should undergo a repair task for excellent results on your file. Make a decision on the method you want to use in repairing your file from the two available methods: do-it-yourself or agency repair methods. But you should still use these five steps to build and maintain a good free credit score gov (freescorereportgov.com).

One: Obtain your report the law has given you the privilege and rights to get a free copy of your file once a year. You can decide to get the three versions: Experian, Transunion, and Equifax at once from annualcreditreport.com or you can get the three individually at different times of the year. This step is a necessity so you can know what has been entered into your file.

Two: Scan thoroughly It is estimated that about 89 percent of all credit reports contain errors and there’s a great possibility that your own file has an error. Reporting agencies enter the information they are furnished with into your file and they cannot alter it. A thorough scanning should reveal some errors or expired accounts.
Three: Challenge Accounts don’t be nonchalant about negative accounts on your file just because it is printed there. Nothing gained, nothing ventured. You should make attempts to get rid of destructive accounts from your file by disputing it with the bureaus or the original creditor.

Four: Negotiate and Pay Do not ignore collections on your report. Try to reach a compromise with collectors, and when you do so get them to do you a favor in return for settling them. A trade of payment in exchange for deletion of a collection account will do you a lot of good.

Five: Get working Try getting some good activity going on and talk to creditors whom you know you’ve got their goodwill to report your activities to bureaus.

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