Image from page 182 of “The Obelisk.” (1922)

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Image from page 182 of “The Obelisk.” (1922)
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Identifier: obelisk1922sout
Title: The Obelisk.
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Southern Illinois State Normal University
Subjects: Southern Illinois State Normal University Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Publisher: Carbondale, Ill. : Southern Illinois Normal University
Contributing Library: Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois

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s,ind Row—Halene Street, Arline Cliappee, Glenn Ayre, Agues Lentz, Rosalie Comment, Edward Wilson, Leah Cockrum.?.rd Row—Velma Harrison, Madeline Bradley, Mary VanSiekle, Mary Dexter, Zee FuUerton, Gladys Bradley, Virginia FuUenwider, Hazel Rendleman.4th Row—Mary Conatser, Grace Eagleson, Aline Nettzger, Alice Barrow, Grace Wiggs, Dilla Hall, Ruth Walters.5th Row—Leta Clark, Lola Newberry, Othel Eaton, Maude Bratten. On the evening of the twenty-third of JMarch, Who Kissed Barbara waspresented. This play was in an unfinished condition in order that the membersmight discuss both its wealv and strong points. In spite of the fact that it was an unfinished product it was very good.IMuch credit for its excellence was due to the coaches Lola Newberry and JessieStewart. The play was a charming one act comedy the plot being very interesting. The cast was as follows: Barbara Faye Chambers Philip Bernard Lollar Elizabeth Andre Ross Elizabeths fiance August Meyer The Butler Edward Wilson

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, Synopses The Strut and Fret presented a two act comedy at the Normal Audi-torium January 24, 1922, for the Ijenefit of the athletic fund. The play was wellattended and reported quite a success. Cast of Characters ^latilda Deering, a rich spinster Velma Harrison Harold Deering, her nephew James Bennett Alice Deering, Harolds sister Ruth Lambert Archie Clark, a young lawyer Deneen Watson Bill AYorth, a man of all trades Othel Eaten Annie 0Shane, maid at the Dcerings iladeline Bradley Act I. Living room at the Deerings home, in a sulnirb of New York.Act n. The same, five minutes later.Time. An evening of the present.Coaches. Zoe Fullerton, Mary Conatser.Head Coach. Mae C. Trovillion. 157 m]\oi^ Cxclusibe Coursiesi ^uggegteb 1—Astronomy (a)—Two nights per week for 1st, 2d, and 3d years—Three nights per asusual for upperelassmen. Course consists of night study of stars and planetsfrom the window sills of the main building. Prerequisite—Campusology a. 2—Finance (a)—Offered eve

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Image from page 118 of “Old Boston taverns and tavern clubs” (1917)
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Identifier: oldbostontavernso00drak
Title: Old Boston taverns and tavern clubs
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Drake, Samuel Adams, 1833-1905 Watkins, Walter Kendall, 1855-1934
Subjects: Taverns (Inns) — Massachusetts Boston Clubs — Massachusetts Boston Boston (Mass.) — Social life and customs
Publisher: Boston, W. A. Butterfield
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ase, and inside isstill to be seen the cylindrical piece of iron which,when heated, kept the delectable liquid contents of theurn hot until imbibed by the frequenters of the tavern.The Green Dragon Tavern site, now occupied by abusiness structure, is OAvned by the St. Andrews Lodgeof Free Masons of Boston, and at a recent gathering ofthe Lodge on St. Andrews Day the urn was exhibitedto the assembled brethren. When the contents of the tavern were sold, the urnwas bought by Mrs. Elizabeth Harrington, who thenkept a famous boarding house on Pearl Street, in abuilding owned by the Q.uincy family. In 1847 thehouse was razed and replaced by the Quincy Block,and Mrs. Harrington removed to High Street andfrom there to Chauncey Place. Some of the prominentmen of Boston boarded with her for many years. Ather death the urn was given to her daughter, Mrs.John R. Bradford, and it has now been presented tothe Society by Miss Phebe C. Bradford of Boston,granddaughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Harrington. 88

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SCHOOU Q5.J^^^^^) ST JW2 6Jithcrtorx, ffoJUL^h, Q POP455OO n BQ <5 n« Mo O o w ID ID &J_ 0 o m aId M 02 a 0)(QID a. ID-»3« O ■oa J IDO o oo MEH <1 oo C5Z M o w OS +343 oQ CompUje.dL by Qeorqe, l,<xmo, tfi THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY A3TOR, LrrOXilLDilN FOUNDATIONS IX. THE HANCOCK TAVERN. As an old landmark the Hancock Tavern is a failure.There was not an old window in the house ; the nailswere Bridgewater nails, the timbers were mill-sawed,and the front of it was of face brick, which were notmade even in 1800. At the time of the Revolution itwas merely a four-room dwelling house of twelve win-dows, and the first license ever given to it as an innwas in 1790. The building recently demolished waserected during the years 1807 to 1812. With the above words, Edward W. McGlenen, cityregistrar, effectually settled the question June 3,1903, ata meeting of the New England Historic GenealogicalSociety, as to the widely credited report that it was inthe Hancock Tavern^ which fo

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Image from page 75 of “The birds of Washington : a complete, scientific and popular account of the 372 species of birds found in the state” (1909)
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Identifier: birdsofwashingto01daws
Title: The birds of Washington : a complete, scientific and popular account of the 372 species of birds found in the state
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Dawson, William Leon, 1873-1928 Bowles, John Hooper Brooks, Allan, 1869-1946
Subjects: Birds — Washington (State)
Publisher: Seattle : Occidental Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: American Museum of Natural History Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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ifty halj-its as their northernkinfolk. Food isne\-er refused, and awell – stuffed speci-men will still carr\grub from camp amisecrete it in bark-crevice iir hollow,against the unknownhour of need. I have never heard the Gray Jay titter more than a soft cooing 2vlicc ezv repeated at random;but Bendire credits it with a near approach to song: and Mrs. Bailey saysof the Jays on Mr. Hood^: Their notes were pleasantly varied. Onecall was remarkablv like the chirp of a robin. Another of the common-est was a weak and rather complaining cry repeated several times. Asharply contrasting one was a pure clear whistle of one note followedby a three-syllabled call something like Ka-wc-aJi. The regular rallyingcry was still dilTerent, a loud and striking two-syllaliled ka-iihcc. The eggs of the Gra\- Ja\ have not \ei been reported from this State,but it is known that the bird builds a very substantial nest of twigs, grasses,plant fibre, and mosses without mud. and that it provides a heavy lining of

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7-,7;,-,-i National Pari!. A B.XCHELORS PET. Photo by J. H. Boudcs. a. The Auk, Vol. III., 1886, p. 167. b. Life Histories of N. A. Birds, Vol. II., p. 394. c. Handbook Birds of the Western U. S., pp. 278-9. THE COWBIRD. 43 soft gray mosses for the eggs. The nest is usually well concealed in a firtree, and may be placed at any height from ten or fifteen feet upward, althousually at sixty or eighty feet. Only one brood is reared in a season, andfamily groups hunt trigether until late in the summer. No. 15. COWBIRD. A. O. U. Xo. 495. Molothrus ater (Bodd.). Synonyms.—Cow Blackbird. Cuckold. Description.—Adult male: Head and neck wood-, seal-, or coffee-brown(variable) : remaining plumage black with metallic greenish or bluish iridescence.Female: Dark grayish brown, showing slight greenish reflections, darkest onwings and tail, lightening on breast and throat. Young in first plumage: Likefemale but lighter below and more or less streaky; above somewhat mottled bybufty edgings of feat

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Image from page 135 of “The blue and white [serial]” (1922)

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Image from page 135 of “The blue and white [serial]” (1922)
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Identifier: bluewhiteserial13ashe
Title: The blue and white [serial]
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Asheville School (Asheville, N.C.)
Subjects: Asheville School (Asheville, N.C.) Private schools School yearbooks
Publisher: Asheville, N.C. : The Senior Class
Contributing Library: University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

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any Hormiguero Central Corporation Central Patricio Punta Alegre Sugar Company Central San Ramon San Agustin Sugar Company Central Senado Soledad Sugar Company Cuban Canadian Sugar Company Trinidad Sugar Company Florida Sugar Company EUROPEAN REPRESENTATIVE: EDWARD GREY & COMPANY LIVERPOOL BOSTON NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA 10 Broad Street 111 West Street 135 South Second Street » » » » » • * • • • • • • • • ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ «• >- ♦ v y ftft ❖t Y T . T f y * y y I ft ft 4 y y X At your service with closed or open cars at all hours $ y I y y y y y 4 I ft Y J I ft y $ y y ft y ft $ I J. L. RARDEN I y ? y y ? Wo/ « Minute Late Auto Service % ft y y y y t y t y t y t y y y y y y Y Y T Y ft t Y Y y y y t y t Y Have Your Parents Use Our Cars •§ ft , Y When in Town Y Y | y ?I YYYYYfY?Y ftI £ Asheville, N. C X*t yyyyy Telephone 431 2 N. Market St. X Y y ftY yyvyyy Yft ROBERT E. McKEE General ContractorConstruction Engineer 1900-1932 Texas St.El PasoTexas

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+—. . + Compliments ofthe GLASS OF 1925 +-———• i Exclusive Ready-to-Wear for Men, Womenand Children Mens and Young Mens Lounging and Dress Clothes,Furnishings and Haberdashery of the Better Kind. Golf and Hunting Togs, Hiking and Camping Clothes,Sweaters, Shoes, etc. Fishin tackle thats fit for fishin. Complete lines ofBaseball, Football, and Tennis Goods. 11 Patton Avenue Asheville, N. C. George W. Langford Company General Contractors MAIN OFFICE AT Louisville, Kentucky In the financing and erecting of office buildings,hotels and other sound building propositions _ourfinancial connections make it possible to be ofconsiderable service to owners by taking bonds inpayment of a large part of the contract price. Ourconstruction organization is unexcelled CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED Compliments ofGEO. B. MATTHEWS & SONSNew Orleans, La. LACKNER, BUTZ & Company Mortgage Investments Bank Floor, Conway Building111 W. Washington St.Chicago Illinois Municipal Bonds ARE TOTALLY FRE

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Image from page 374 of “City documents. Municipal register, mayor’s address, annual reports, etc” (1894)
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Identifier: citydocumentsmun1918newb
Title: City documents. Municipal register, mayor’s address, annual reports, etc
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: New Bedford (Mass.)
Subjects: New Bedford (Mass.) — Politics and government
Publisher: New Bedford, The City, Printed by the Baker Mfg. Co
Contributing Library: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Digitizing Sponsor: Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

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pig PARK DEPARTMENT FINANCIAL REPORT New Bedford, Mass. December 1, 1918. To the Board of Park Commissioners : The Twenty-fifth Annual Financial Report ofthe receipts and expenditures of the department ofparks, for the year ending November 30, 1918, whichI have the honor to submit contains in detail, inform-ation regarding the finances of the department in-cluding the receipts, expenses, and disbursements ofthe Park Commission, and affords in this summary,which is given herewith, an opportunity for thosewho are interested in parks, and their managementand maintenance, a correct explanation of all moneysprovided by the taxpayers for the past year, and thesame is hereby submitted to our citizens for their con-sideration.

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P20 PARK DEPARTMENT Financial Statement for the Year Buttonwood Park ,902.42 Hazelwood Park 2,792.13 Brooklawn Park 7,785.13 Triangle Park 50.00 Common 7,847.37 Office 4,857.18 Ashley Park 1G0.80 Bridge Approach 1,112.68 Grove Park 2,482.82 Balance on hand 9.47 Transferred to unappropriated Funds (see City Auditors Balance 718.80 ,718.80 Receipts Appropriation ,000.00 Sale of milk 112.59 Rent, (cafe privileges) 150.00 Sale of Vegetables 376.21 Sale of wood 80.00 ;718.80 Office Expenses and MiscellaneousExpenditures Superintendent and Clerk ,369.73 Telephone 124.17 Supplies 119.44 Auto Rent, repairs, gasoline, etc 553.08 Printing 60.45 Annual Report 124.00 Traveling Expenses 345.51 Painting Office 55.07 Miscellaneous 105.73 ,847.18

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