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Image from page 293 of “Costume: fanciful, historical, and theatrical” (1906)
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Identifier: costumefancifulh00ariauoft
Title: Costume: fanciful, historical, and theatrical
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Aria, Eliza (Davis) 1866-
Subjects: Costume
Publisher: London Macmillan
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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in different attire, andwould yet do well to consider the advisability ofrehearsing in their frocks on more than one occa-sion before they permit these to accompany themin their histrionic duties. The stage has oftentimes had the privilege ofintroducing new fashions, and the most apatheticpatron of the playhouse may be lured to theauditorium by the report of something new inpetticoats, an ideal coiffure, or the latest modishmandate obeyed to the letter in a belt. MissViolet Vanbrugh may have the credit of bringingto notice the elegant charms of the corselet, andthe trim fascinations of the stock collar, worn withthe right sort of cravat. To Miss Mary Moore Tattribute a revived popularity of the broad blackAlsatian bow ; she w^ore this in velvet in herclever impersonation in Mrs. Gorringes Neck-lace., and all the world of women flocked to seeand to copy ; while her little short-waisted whitemuslin frock, with broad ribbons and puffed sleeves,in Rosemary made that heroine an inevitable

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JULIAN L ESTRANGE AS HERMES. 248 COSTUME CHAP. XX figure at fancy-dress balls for months after theproduction of this dainty little play. Miss LettyLind, Miss Kate Vaughan, and Miss Jessie Mil-ward—I take my examples at random—may allbe counted pioneers. To Kate Vaughan we owethe lace-frilled petticoat, beneath the influence ofwhich she daintily danced her way into publicfavour. Miss Letty Lind first wore the accordion-pleated dancing skirt, and Miss Jessie Milwardpopularised the lawn-embroidered collars and cuffs.I forget which Adelphi melodrama she graced withthese trifles, but I am safe in asserting that she wasthe heroine of the drama, and was made happy bywedding bells as the curtain fell. It is easy for me to let my pictures in thischapter give me my cues for dilating on speciallysplendid productions which it has been my privilegeto enjoy, for Mr. Anderson has been responsible forthe majority of these, and his pencil has illuminatedthe various centuries with experience, infin

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Image from page 61 of “Make your game, or, The adventures of the stout gentleman, the slim gentleman, and the man with the iron chest : a narrative of the Rhine and thereabouts” (1860)
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Identifier: makeyourgameorad00sala
Title: Make your game, or, The adventures of the stout gentleman, the slim gentleman, and the man with the iron chest : a narrative of the Rhine and thereabouts
Year: 1860 (1860s)
Authors: Sala, George Augustus, 1828-1895
Subjects:
Publisher: London : Ward and Lock
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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rbles; anxiously expectant of hugeconsignments of hardbake and toffy from the DutchEast Indies, and bent upon superhuman acquisitionsof Dutch dolls. I made a hurried sketch of one ofthese Lilliputian sages, and as I vouch for the fidelityof the presentment, the reader will be enabled toadmit that I have not exaggerated the sagacioussobriety of these small philosophers. I would gladlysay more concerning Rotterdam, but the villanousodour of the herrings, the cheese, and the tobacco-smoke produced so appreciable an effect upon myduodenum, that I was compelled to resort, for purelymedicinal purposes, to schnaps, which— Here thestout gentlemans report abruptly breaks oft, andafter the last word a slight scorching of the manu-script is visible, as from the contact with the buttend of an ignited cigar, together with a curious cir-cular blot of a hue somewhat darker than the paper,apparently produced by some foreign liquid. Rotterdam, writes the owner of the iron chest, 4-1 SIAKE TOLR GAME.

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dutch nor. in his reckless manner, may be regarded as onehuge pipe. The people smoke, the chimneys smoke ;everywhere dense fumes are being emitted from tubesof all shapes and lengths. I can imagine on a wet dayhow the horses, the dogs, and the low banks of thecanals must smoke too. I am, myself, accustomed tosmoke the very best cigars obtainable for credit ormoney; and as good cigars are almost unobtainableabroad, I determined on my landing at Rotterdam togive up cigars for a season altogether, and addict my-self to a mild course of meerschaum pipes. I entereda tobacconists, in a narrow street behind the highchurch, and asked to look at a pipe. I never saw sucha pipe-shop in my life. It seemed as though ten thou-sand Haarlem organs of tobacco pipes, rolled into one,had been stacked in the narrow magasin. They hungfrom the ceiling, clustered in the corners like the fascesof the Roman lictors, covered the counter, littered the MAKE TOUIl GAME. 45

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